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Designing and Delivering Better Healthcare Solutions

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My talk to Mobilitas team on Design Thinking, Agile and Scrum, and how some of these ideas can be applied in healthcare to design and deliver better solutions.

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Designing and Delivering Better Healthcare Solutions

  1. 1. DESIGNING AND DELIVERING BETTER HEALTHCARE SOLUTIONS TATHAGAT VARMA HTTP://THOUGHTLEADERSHIP.IN
  2. 2. Photo by Adrian S Jones - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License https://www.flickr.com/photos/30692297@N07 Created with Haiku Deck
  3. 3. From Terrifying…
  4. 4. To Terrific!
  5. 5. Mayo Clinic’s Jack and Jill Rooms
  6. 6. Kaiser Permanente’s Patient Room
  7. 7. Aravind Eye Care
  8. 8. Naandi Foundation
  9. 9. Lucky Iron Fish
  10. 10. Photo by Pratham Books - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/35026043@N03 Created with Haiku Deck
  11. 11. http://www.cmswire.com/images/problem%20solving%20vs%20design%20thinking.png
  12. 12. Photo by Bert Kaufmann - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/22746515@N02 Created with Haiku Deck
  13. 13. Photo by Jamiecat * - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/27330325@N08 Created with Haiku Deck
  14. 14. Photo by amira_a - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/46646401@N06 Created with Haiku Deck
  15. 15. Photo by Thomas Hawk - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License https://www.flickr.com/photos/51035555243@N01 Created with Haiku Deck
  16. 16. Photo by CERDEC - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/47119026@N07 Created with Haiku Deck
  17. 17. Photo by jurvetson - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/44124348109@N01 Created with Haiku Deck
  18. 18. Photo by Luz Adriana Villa A. - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/11599314@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  19. 19. Photo by Gerard Stolk (vers le Mardi Gras) - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License https://www.flickr.com/photos/20762304@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  20. 20. Photo by Rosenfeld Media - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/9411449@N05 Created with Haiku Deck
  21. 21. Photo by A Guy Taking Pictures - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/80901381@N04 Created with Haiku Deck
  22. 22. Photo by JD Hancock - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/83346641@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  23. 23. Photo by Robert S. Donovan - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License https://www.flickr.com/photos/10687935@N04 Created with Haiku Deck
  24. 24. Photo by CIMMYT - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License https://www.flickr.com/photos/44760652@N05 Created with Haiku Deck
  25. 25. Photo by Benimoto - Creative Commons Attribution License https://www.flickr.com/photos/44545509@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  26. 26. Advent of Agile Methodologies… • 1970: Royce critiques Waterfall and offers improvement ideas • 1971: Harlan Mills proposes Incremental Development • 1986: Barry Boehm proposes Spiral Model • 1987: Cleanroom Software engineering • 1991: Sashimi Overlapping Waterfall Model • 1992: Crystal family of methodologies • 1994: DSDM • 1995: Scrum • 1996: Rational Unified Process framework • 1997: Gilb’s Evo Project Management • 1997: Feature Driven Development • 1999: Extreme Programming Explained • 2001: Agile Manifesto is born • 2003: Lean Software Development • 2005: PM Declaration of Interdependence • 2007: Kanban-based software engineering • 2009: Scrumban • 20xx: Something new !?! (hopefully!)
  27. 27. Incremental Software Development
  28. 28. Iterative Software Development
  29. 29. Incremental & Iterative Software Development
  30. 30. What is the most important part in these two machines? “The Brakes!!!” They let you go faster…
  31. 31. Agility vs. Discipline? http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/edge/08/feb08/lines_barnes_holmes_ambler/
  32. 32. Agile Manifesto, 2001 http://agilemanifesto.org/
  33. 33. 1 • Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. 2 • Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. 3 • Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a 
 preference to the shorter timescale. 4 • Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. 5 • Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. 6 • The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. 7 • Working software is the primary measure of progress. 8 • Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. 9 • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. 10 • Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. 11 • The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. 12 • At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.
  34. 34. http://www.ambysoft.com/artwork/comparingTechniques.jpg
  35. 35. https://www.versionone.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/agile_development_value_proposition.gif
  36. 36. Let’s talk Scrum…
  37. 37. The New New Product Development Game, HBR 1986 • In today’s fast-paced, fiercely competitive world of commercial new product development, speed and flexibility are essential. Companies are increasingly realizing that the old, sequential approach to developing new products simply won’t get the job done. Instead, companies in Japan and the US are using a holistic method—as in rugby, the ball gets passed within the team as it moves as a unit up the field. • This holistic approach has six characteristics: built-in instability, self- organizing project teams, overlapping development phases, “multilearning,” subtle control, and organizational transfer of learning. The six pieces fit together like a jigsaw puzzle, forming a fast flexible process for new product development. Just as important, the new approach can act as a change agent: it is a vehicle for introducing creative, market-driven ideas and processes into an old, rigid organization. https://hbr.org/1986/01/the-new-new-product-development-game
  38. 38. The New New Product Development Game, HBR 1986 https://hbr.org/1986/01/the-new-new-product-development-game
  39. 39. Scrum Team Scrum framework Sprints of 1-4 weeks Daily Standup every 24 hours Product Backlog Sprint Backlog Priority / value / risk Potentially Shippable Increment Scrum MasterProduct Owner
  40. 40. Recap ❖Design Thinking offers an interesting approach to solve people’s problems ❖It is as much a mindset as a process, though not a ‘process’ in traditional sense ❖It integrates elements from people (desirability), technology (feasibility) and business (viability) aspects ❖Agile software development offers a feedback-driven approach to develop solutions ❖Scrum is a simple yet powerful framework that captures the essence of agile thinking very well ❖Design+Delivery could be strengthened by these ideas.
  41. 41. It’s not about the method! • A photographer went to a socialite party in New York. As he entered the front door, the host said, “I love your pictures – they’re wonderful; you must have a fantastic camera.” • He said nothing until dinner was finished, then, “That was a wonderful dinner; you must have a terrific stove.” – Sam Haskins http://www.haskins.com/ImageShop/Image_Shop_60s/60s_Books_A.Image_01.html
  42. 42. References http://newsroom.gehealthcare.com/from-terrifying-to-terrific-creative-journey-of-the-adventure-series/ http://ssir.org/articles/entry/design_thinking_for_social_innovation https://hbr.org/2015/12/design-thinking-can-help-improve-care-for-the-elderly http://ideastudio.osu.edu/design-thinking/ http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/12/13/a-breath-of-fresh-air-for-health-care/ http://www.mayo.edu/center-for-innovation/what-we-do/design-thinking http://www.forbes.com/sites/henrydoss/2014/05/23/design-thinking-in-healthcare-one-step-at-a-time/ #4c0b9b9d628d https://www.fastcodesign.com/1673101/this-iron-fish-offers-relief-from-anemia http://www.luckyironfish.com/ http://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=7134 http://www.healthcarebusinesstech.com/nurses-key-to-better-patient-care/

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