Difference between supervision and monitoring by sajjad awan

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  • Once you have laid out your plans to manage a project, and that project is underway, you need a way to track the progress of your project. Monitoring is the routine or continuous measurement of progress while the project is ongoing.
    It consists of checking and measuring project progress by focusing on project’s quality, time, and cost. It also consists of analyzing the current situation. This means comparing the development of the project to the original plan, and identifying the causes and impacts of any deviations from the plan. Monitoring also includes reacting to new events, opportunities, and issues and identifying necessary actions and responses.
  • Evaluation is a broad term used to describe an effort to describe and understand a situation. Evaluation consists of the measurement of project progress toward reaching the measurable objectives that were laid out in the management plan. It is a way both to improve public health programs and account for their impact.
    Evaluation takes place when the development of a project is completed. A project can be evaluated based several aspects shown in the diagram. Balancing the tradeoffs between time, cost, and scope all affect a project’s quality. Evaluating a project on its timeliness would examine whether specific actions and the project as a whole were completed on time. Quality is concerned with whether the project has met the quality standards that were set at the start of the project. Cost, as you know is vital to keep under control, but the amount of money spent contributes to the balance between time, scope and quality. For example, a project of a larger scope will cost more; to keep costs down you may try and complete the project more quickly, but this will affect the quality with which you are able to implement the project.
  • The mechanics of conducting monitoring and evaluation are very similar. In fact, monitoring is a type of evaluation – it is essentially an evaluation that occurs while a project is ongoing.
    This table highlights the differences between monitoring and evaluation. Monitoring is continuous while the project is ongoing. Evaluation is episodic and usually occurs at the end of a project. Monitoring tracks the progress of a project and oversees it, whereas evaluation offers a critique of the project. The purpose of monitoring is to improve efficiency and adjust work plan. The purpose of evaluation is to improve effectiveness, impact, and future program development.
  • Monitoring focuses on inputs, outputs, process outcomes, and work plans, while evaluation focuses on effectiveness, relevance, impact, and cost-effectiveness. The information source for monitoring are routine systems, field observations, progress reports, and rapid assessments. The information sources for evaluation are mostly the same, but have two extra components- surveys and studies. Monitoring is conducted by program manager, community workers, community beneficiaries, funders, and supervisors. Evaluation in conducted by program managers, supervisors/funders, policy makers, and beneficiaries.
    Source: National HIV/AIDS Program Monitoring & Evaluation, The Caribbean Health Research Council. Downloaded from www.chrc-caribbean.org on October 15, 2007.
  • Difference between supervision and monitoring by sajjad awan

    1. 1. SUPERVISION AND MONITORING SAJJAD AWAN Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    2. 2. SUPERVISION At the end of this SESSION participants will be able to: • Describe different supervisory roles. • Identify necessary supervisory skills. • Describe the conceptual model of Situational Supervision. • Identify behaviors associated with both supervision styles and employee development. • Using a supervisory check list • Monitoring and Monitoring tool Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    3. 3. MANAGERIAL CYCLE DIRECTING IMPLEMENTING SUPERVISING PLANNING MONITORING SITUATION ANALYSIS EVALUATING Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    4. 4. DEFINITION MOTIVATING PEOPLE TO DO THEIR BEST • Typically supervision refers to the activity carried out by supervisors to oversee the productivity and progress of employees who report directly to them. • Supervision is a management activity and supervisors have a management role in the organization. • Supervisors convey information and directives from upper management to employees and are responsible for getting work done. • An art or process by which designated individual or group of individuals oversee the work of others and establish control to improve the work and as well as the workers also. Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    5. 5. • SUPERvision superVISION Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    6. 6. Supervisory roles • • • • • Role Model Teacher Mentor Motivator, Coach Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    7. 7. RESPONSIBILITIES • • • • • Communicate and clarify major job duties, priorities, and expectations. Establish and communicate performance standards. Monitor employees' performance through observation, discussion, etc. Document good and unacceptable performance. Provide continuous coaching and constructive feedback in a timely manner. Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    8. 8. RESPONSIBILITIES (contd.) • Hold performance discussions (at least annually). • Correct poor performance and reinforce good performance. • Help employees to develop skills and abilities for improved performance. • Provide necessary information, resources, and opportunities to help accomplish key objectives Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    9. 9. Performance Management • • • • • Job Description Performance Standards Observation & Feedback Performance Appraisal Performance Development Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    10. 10. Performance Analysis Matrix High B Resource or Environment C Selection eva h eey o p m e h se o D l e t wonk bo e a r po ppa j t i r A Motivation D Training low low Does the employee have the proper attitude (desire) to perform the job? Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar High
    11. 11. Performance problems Basic reasons why employees do not perform well) • • • • • Lack of skills Lack of Information Motivational Issues Personal Issues Environmetal Issues Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    12. 12. Stages of an employee joining an organization • • • • What do I get ? What do I give ? Do I belong here ? How we all can grow ? Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    13. 13. How to motivate? • • • • • • Do I know what is expected of me at work? Do I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right? At work, do I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day? In the last seven days, have I received recognition or praise for doing good work? Does my supervisor, or someone at work, seem to care about me as a person? Is there someone at work who encourages my development? Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    14. 14. How to motivate? (contd.) • At work, do my opinions seem to count? • Does the mission/purpose of my company make me feel my job is important? • Are my co-workers committed to doing quality work? • Do I have a best friend at work? • In the last six months, has someone at work talked to me about my progress? • This last year, have I had opportunities at work to learn and grow? Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    15. 15. USING A SUPERVISORY CHECK LIST • It’s a tool to ensure a systematic approach to supervision by reminding the supervisors to focus on the knowledge,skill,major activities,plans and performance of the worker • No checklist format ideal for all situations • To be developed to suit his specific needs • Two essential parts:1) List of activities and skills to be supervised.2) Space for the supervisor to make notes on his observations,assessment,recommendations,or actions taken. Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    16. 16. Monitoring • Would you drive in a Car only using the rear-view mirror? Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    17. 17. Monitoring Monitoring: routine or continuous measurement of progress while the project is ongoing 1. Checking and measuring progress 2. Analyzing the situation 3. Reacting to new events, opportunities, and issues Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    18. 18. Monitoring If you can’t measure it – You probably can,t manage it Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    19. 19. Monitoring 1. Define Objectives 2. Develop Indicators 3. Collect Data 4.Analyse Performance Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    20. 20. Monitoring Tools Program Implementation Plan GANTT Chart (Activity vs. Time) Other pre-designed tools: Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    21. 21. Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    22. 22. Evaluation Evaluation: Measurement of progress, results, and impact when project is completed Time Cost Quality Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar Scope
    23. 23. Differences Between Monitoring and Evaluation Monitoring Evaluation Frequenc Continuous y Episodic (end of project) Focus Tracking Progress / Oversight Critique Purpose Improve efficiency, adjust Improve work plan effectiveness, impact, future projects Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar
    24. 24. Differences Between Monitoring and Evaluation (contd.) Monitoring Component Inputs, outputs, process s outcomes, work plans Evaluation Effectiveness, relevance, impact, cost-effectiveness Information Routine systems, field Sources observations, progress reports, rapid assessments Same + surveys, Conducted Project manager, by program manager, supervisor, team lead Program managers, external parties, policy-makers, beneficiaries Sajjad Ahmad Awan PhD Research Scholar

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