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Collaborate barrie - Simcoe County Coalition

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Simcoe County Coalition - presentation to Council 2015

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Collaborate barrie - Simcoe County Coalition

  1. 1. “Collaborate Barrie” A Made-in-Barrie Approach to Collaborative, Risk-driven Community Safety and Well-Being
  2. 2. So What is ‘Collaborate Barrie’ About?
  3. 3. So What is ‘Collaborate Barrie’ About? • It is a joint project amongst community partners; to address those in the community facing the highest need, with Police as one of the champions to move it forward
  4. 4. So What is ‘Collaborate Barrie’ About? • It is a joint project amongst community partners; to address those in the community facing the highest need, with Police as one of the champions to move it forward • It is about using our existing and combined resources and our investments in a new way to:
  5. 5. So What is ‘Collaborate Barrie’ About? • It is a joint project amongst community partners; to address those in the community facing the highest need, with Police as one of the champions to move it forward • It is about using our existing and combined resources and our investments in a new way to: • break down silos
  6. 6. So What is ‘Collaborate Barrie’ About? • It is a joint project amongst community partners; to address those in the community facing the highest need, with Police as one of the champions to move it forward • It is about using our existing and combined resources and our investments in a new way to: • break down silos • increase efficiencies, and
  7. 7. So What is ‘Collaborate Barrie’ About? • It is a joint project amongst community partners; to address those in the community facing the highest need, with Police as one of the champions to move it forward • It is about using our existing and combined resources and our investments in a new way to: • break down silos • increase efficiencies, and • mobilize responses within 24 to 48 hours
  8. 8. So What is ‘Collaborate Barrie’ About? • It is a joint project amongst community partners; to address those in the community facing the highest need, with Police as one of the champions to move it forward • It is about using our existing and combined resources and our investments in a new way to: • break down silos • increase efficiencies, and • mobilize responses within 24 to 48 hours • It is about addressing issues at the front-end to see dividends down the road
  9. 9. So What is ‘Collaborate Barrie’ About? • It is a joint project amongst community partners; to address those in the community facing the highest need, with Police as one of the champions to move it forward • It is about using our existing and combined resources and our investments in a new way to: • break down silos • increase efficiencies, and • mobilize responses within 24 to 48 hours • It is about addressing issues at the front-end to see dividends down the road • The situation table, which forms part of ‘Collaborate Barrie’ is not a new body and does not keep any case-records, and only tracks de-identified data on risks and situations for the purposes of identifying opportunities for systemic change “We do other peoples jobs poorly but together we can do all jobs well”
  10. 10. Recognition of the Model This innovative, collaborative approach to risk-based community safety originated in Glasgow Scotland with great success. In the fall of 2010, (then) Prince Albert Saskatchewan Police Chief Dale McFee organized a group that went overseas to see how they operate and brought the idea back to Prince Albert.” This type of mobilization has been gaining national and international recognition since it began. Communities across Canada are embracing this type of crime prevention initiative with great success. Barrie will be next
  11. 11. The Economic Argument • Police services across the country are seeing the cost of reactive policing is forever increasing but the impact is not. We know that we need to find new and innovative ways to achieve results. • This model: -uses existing resources. -requires minimal additional dollars to operate. -through the collaborative front-end efforts to address issues before they escalate, reduces demands on the back-end, which can result in enormous savings down the road.
  12. 12. The Economic Argument In this image, taken from Saskatchewan in 2013, it shows that police are bringing 51% of the situations to the table, but they are leaving with a lead role in only 10% of those situations.
  13. 13. Recognition of the Model Across Canada, there are models operating or starting up in: BC Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Ontario New Brunswick PEI Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador.
  14. 14. Recognition of the Model There are several models now in Ontario, in various stages of operation including: FOCUS Rexdale Our Shared Commitment Sudbury Connectivity Cambridge and Kitchener and Waterloo The Guelph Enterprise for Community Safety and Well-being Community Mobilization North Bay Safe Brantford The City of Ottawa’s MERIT program and now
  15. 15. Recognition of the Model There are several models now in Ontario, in various stages of operation including: FOCUS Rexdale Our Shared Commitment Sudbury Connectivity Cambridge and Kitchener and Waterloo The Guelph Enterprise for Community Safety and Well-being Community Mobilization North Bay Safe Brantford The City of Ottawa’s MERIT program and now
  16. 16. What About Privacy?
  17. 17. What About Privacy? • Saskatchewan conducted a year-long study into provincial and federal privacy policies, and the result of that study confirmed that with a few small adjustments, the Hub model could continue working within the letter and spirit of existing regulations.
  18. 18. What About Privacy? • Saskatchewan conducted a year-long study into provincial and federal privacy policies, and the result of that study confirmed that with a few small adjustments, the Hub model could continue working within the letter and spirit of existing regulations. • In Ontario, to build on those findings, a multi-sector Ontario Working Group also conducted a lengthy study on existing policies. The widely adopted Four Filter process, used in these Hub or Situation Table models, has been reviewed by the OIPC and all signs have been favorable that this approach stands up to the highest levels of scrutiny.
  19. 19. What About Privacy? • Saskatchewan conducted a year-long study into provincial and federal privacy policies, and the result of that study confirmed that with a few small adjustments, the Hub model could continue working within the letter and spirit of existing regulations. • In Ontario, to build on those findings, a multi-sector Ontario Working Group also conducted a lengthy study on existing policies. The widely adopted Four Filter process, used in these Hub or Situation Table models, has been reviewed by the OIPC and all signs have been favorable that this approach stands up to the highest levels of scrutiny. • In an effort to put the issue to rest for good, both Ontario and Saskatchewan co-hosted with Public Safety Canada (PSC) a National Policy Makers Dialogue in January, with the goal of arriving at common practices that will accommodate federal and all provincial laws, regulations and policies.
  20. 20. • In Prince Albert, where the model has been in place the longest, dramatic reductions in violent crime have been recorded for three years running.
  21. 21. • In Prince Albert, where the model has been in place the longest, dramatic reductions in violent crime have been recorded for three years running.
  22. 22. • In Prince Albert, where the model has been in place the longest, dramatic reductions in violent crime have been recorded for three years running.
  23. 23. • And other social impacts are tracking favorably, such as child protection caseloads, emergency room visits, mental health interventions and responses to truancy and classroom issues.
  24. 24. • Continue to reach out to community partners in order to build support and get them involved.
  25. 25. • Continue to reach out to community partners in order to build support and get them involved. • Educate those who are to be involved in the initiative with:
  26. 26. • Continue to reach out to community partners in order to build support and get them involved. • Educate those who are to be involved in the initiative with: • The Simulation based E-Learning Program which includes and videos and information on the proper application of the Four Filter Approach, Mock Hub Scenarios, and Filter Four ‘Door Knock’ re-enactments.
  27. 27. • Continue to reach out to community partners in order to build support and get them involved. • Educate those who are to be involved in the initiative with: • The Simulation based E-Learning Program which includes and videos and information on the proper application of the Four Filter Approach, Mock Hub Scenarios, and Filter Four ‘Door Knock’ re-enactments. • Tracking database, which has now been adapted to Ontario and is referred to as the Risk Tracking Database or RTD.
  28. 28. • Continue to reach out to community partners in order to build support and get them involved. • Educate those who are to be involved in the initiative with: • The Simulation based E-Learning Program which includes and videos and information on the proper application of the Four Filter Approach, Mock Hub Scenarios, and Filter Four ‘Door Knock’ re-enactments. • Tracking database, which has now been adapted to Ontario and is referred to as the Risk Tracking Database or RTD. • Documents, videos and templates, which can be made available.
  29. 29. Saskatchewan/Peel Learning Video – New Situation 1 This video is taken from the E-Learning Program available to interested communities: http://vimeo.com/93661756
  30. 30. Saskatchewan/Peel Learning Video – Four Filter Approach This video is taken from the E-Learning Program available to interested communities: http://vimeo.com/93616068

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