Canopy management young tree canopy management – a broad acre perspective - scott norval

785 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
785
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Canopy management young tree canopy management – a broad acre perspective - scott norval

  1. 1. Young Tree CanopyManagement
  2. 2. Maccmanagement Pty Ltd3 farms managed in the Bundaberg regionCompany started in 2005 first trees planted in June 20062 Orchards developed from scratch – originally Sugar cane and small crop farmsMajority of trees planted in 2007, first crop in 2010 with this years crop approximately 200tn
  3. 3. 40,125 trees planted at 8 x 4Varieties include: 816, A203,741,660,Daddow,344,246,A268 Friday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 3
  4. 4. Friday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 4
  5. 5. 32,375 trees planted at 8 x 4Varieties include: 816,741,Daddow,A16 Friday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 5
  6. 6. Farm Prep and PlantingFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 6
  7. 7. Friday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 7
  8. 8. Hand Pruning Young Trees• Primary purpose on Main Structure based is a central leader to develop a strong• Strong lateral branches well balanced• Narrow crotch anglesframework for future removed growth• Less prone to wind damage• More open tree at maturityFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 8
  9. 9. Narrow Crutch AngleFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 9
  10. 10. Inward growing branchesFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 10
  11. 11. Hand Pruning Young Trees• Manual work carried out with secateurs• Average cost to prune (Young trees sub 2 year age) $0.12 per tree per round• Good worker doing 120 to 140 trees per hour or 1000 trees per dayFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 11
  12. 12. Hand Pruning Young Trees - The good• Effective in reducing wind damage to young trees• Good structure formed and held in some varieties – 741, 660, 344 and 246• More open tree reduced pest pressure – Twig GirdlerFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 12
  13. 13. Hand Pruning Young Trees - The bad• Reduction in early yields when compared with other methods• Hard to source required volume of labour – job requires training• Lack of labour meant frequency of pruning over 75000 trees was not high enough and led to too much foliage being removed each round slowing tree growth• Some varieties just not suited – A203Friday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 13
  14. 14. Mechanical Pruning• To promote branching and increase early yield• To control canopy size to minimise wind damage• Skirting of trees to allow access for harvestingFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 14
  15. 15. Mechanical Pruning• F.A.M.A. 3 bladed pruner used• Cuts skirt, side and top at same time. Two passes per tree• Average cost $0.20 per tree (Includes depreciation and direct costs)• Approx. 200 trees per hour average• Pruned at an interval to promote branching every 30cm Friday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 15
  16. 16. Mechanical Pruning - The Good• Effective protection from wind damage• Increased yield in year 3,4 and 5• Low capital cost – pruner sits on old tractor and is used whenever time allows• Atypical tree shape maintained by pruning to point. Friday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 16
  17. 17. Friday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 17
  18. 18. Mechanical Pruning - The Bad• Low tractor speed, two passes per tree• Increased density of trees as they matureFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 18
  19. 19. ConclusionsHand Pruning Mechanical Pruning- Effective on some - Relatively fast and cheap varieties - Increased early yields- Hard to source competent labour on a large scaleFriday, September 28, 2012 Scott Norval 19

×