Auto seat design and sitting comfort

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Video shows driver in uncomfortable production seat and comfortable modified seat. ERL model is used to explains the difference in comfort.

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Auto seat design and sitting comfort

  1. 1. Auto Seat Design and Sitting Comfort<br />ERL LLC<br />March 1, 2011<br />
  2. 2. Which drive is more comfortable?<br />Drive A<br />Drive B<br />Video Follows<br />No sound Available.<br />
  3. 3. What are Drives A and B?<br />
  4. 4. 40 drivers from 25 to 76 years of age<br />Mid-Size Sedan<br />2 hour highway drive in production seat<br />Measurements in vehicle on highway<br />Michigan State University research program<br />Drive A<br />
  5. 5. Drive B<br />18 drivers from original 40 in Drive A<br />Same 2 hour highway drive in seat modified for Mid-Size Sedan<br />
  6. 6. Subjective<br />Comfort<br />Measurements in DrivesA & B at Michigan State University.<br />Pressure Distribution<br />Position: 3D Video Measurements<br />Seat Positions<br />
  7. 7. Seat back centerline shape was modified for Drive B.<br />
  8. 8. Modified Seat<br />Production Seat<br />Foam was added at top of backand removed at bottom of back.<br />
  9. 9. Modified Seat<br />Production Seat<br />Changes for Modified Seat came from driver discomfort in Drive A and ERL model of back posture.<br />
  10. 10. How did modified seat affect the driver in Drive B?<br />
  11. 11. 11<br />Driver changed from slumped in Drive A to neutral back posture in Drive B.<br />Drive A Production Seat<br />Drive B Modified Seat<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  12. 12. How do we know?<br />Measurements in Drives Aand Band ERL model to understand the change.<br />
  13. 13. In Drive B, Pelvis rotated 4.6º forward.<br />Drive B<br />Drive A<br />
  14. 14. Pelvis rotated rearward in the slumped posture.<br />Slumped Pelvis Position<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  15. 15. Pelvis rotates forward when posture changes from Slumped to Neutral<br />Neutral Pelvis Position<br />Slumped Pelvis Position<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  16. 16. In Drive B, drivers moved the seat 19mm forward for seat support.<br />Neutral Seat Position<br />Slumped Seat Position<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  17. 17. Driver selects fore/aft position for reach and low pressure on buttocks in seatback.<br />Slumped Seat Position<br />Buttocks<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  18. 18. Production (ID-Pt)<br />Modified (ID-Pt)<br />In Drive B, the highest pressure point (ID) under buttocks moved rearward.<br />
  19. 19. ID is the highest pressure point under the pelvis.<br />Slumped ID Position<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  20. 20. ID moves rearward on seat when posture changes from Slumped to Neutral.<br />Neutral ID Position<br />Slumped ID Position<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  21. 21. Eye height is a function of torso posture.<br />Slumped Line of Sight<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  22. 22. In Drive B, the driver’s eye moved upwards 11mm and rearwards 17mm.<br />Neutral Line of Sight<br />Slumped Line of Sight<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  23. 23. In Drive B, drivers raised the steering wheel 3.6º.<br />Drive A<br />Drive B<br />Drive B Neutral Posture<br />Drive A Slumped Posture<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  24. 24. Drivers position steering wheel fortheir preferred arm and leg joint angles.<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  25. 25. ERL, LLC<br />Eye and shoulder rise with change from slumped to erect postures.<br />Eye<br />Shoulder<br />Erect<br />Neutral<br />Slumped<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  26. 26. Every time drivers adjusted the seat, position was recorded by computer.<br />Seat Adjustments<br />Fore/Aft<br />Front<br />Seat Height<br />Rear<br />
  27. 27. The longest time in one position is the Modal Period of seat position.<br />Modal Period<br />
  28. 28. Modal period increased from 45 in Drive A to 75 minutes in Drive B.<br />Modal Period<br />
  29. 29. Small and large drivers use back posture to meet different needs.<br />
  30. 30. 30<br />Small women prefer Neutral & Erect back postures.<br />Headliner<br />5th%tile<br />Erect<br />Line of Sight<br />Neutral<br />Slumped<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  31. 31. 31<br />Change in posture raises eye height for better downward vision.<br />5th%tile<br />Headliner<br />Erect<br />Erect Line of Sight<br />Slumped Line of Sight<br />Slumped<br />Neutral<br />Erect<br />Slumped<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  32. 32. 32<br />Preferred back posture is neutral which uses least muscle activity.<br />50th%tile<br />Erect<br />All spinal joints are in the middle of their range of motion.<br />Neutral<br />Slumped<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  33. 33. 33<br />Headliner too close for neutral posture in large male.<br />95th %tile<br />Headliner<br />Erect<br />Neutral<br />Slumped<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  34. 34. 34<br />Headliner often forces large male into slumped posture.<br />95th %tile<br />Headliner<br />Erect<br />Neutral<br />Slumped<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  35. 35. 35<br />Slumped posture needsadditional rearward travel.<br />Headliner<br />95th %tile<br />Erect<br />Neutral<br />Seat moves rearward.<br />Slumped<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  36. 36. Why do the seat and package promote a slumped posture?<br />
  37. 37. Head restraint position pushes head forward into slumped posture<br />Can be modified for comfort and Federal regulations<br />
  38. 38. Low seat back pushes buttocks forward into slumped posture.<br />Can be modified for comfort and Federal regulations<br />Can be comfortable with different design.<br />
  39. 39. In new vehicles, seat still pushessmall woman into slumped posture.<br />
  40. 40. Seat design must pass the H-point test and head restraint regulation.<br />
  41. 41. Comfort is a development goal at supplier for seats that meet H-point and safety requirements!<br />
  42. 42. Oscar back shape and body size define test requirements for interior.<br />Oscar:<br /> 50th% Torso<br />95th% Legs<br />
  43. 43. Oscar back shape does not represent a slumped posture.<br />Oscar:<br /> 50th% Torso<br />95th% Legs<br />ERL:<br /> 50th% Torso<br />50th% Legs<br />Slumped posture in 50th %tile male<br />
  44. 44. Oscar back shape does not represent a neutral posture.<br />Oscar:<br /> 50th% Torso<br />95th% Legs<br />ERL:<br /> 50th% Torso<br />50th% Legs<br />Neutral posture in 50th %tile male<br />
  45. 45. Oscar’s highest pressure point (ID) is posterior of the Medium Male<br />Oscar:<br /> 50th% Torso<br />95th% Legs<br />ERL:<br /> 50th% Torso<br />50th% Legs<br />Neutral ID Position<br />Oscar’s ID Position<br />
  46. 46. 46<br />Seat designed first for “Oscar’s” unique back posture.<br />“Oscar”<br />
  47. 47. 47<br />Seat designed to pass H-point test.<br />Unique Back Posture<br />SAE Practice: “Slide the H-point machine rearward … until the seat pan contacts the seatback.”<br />
  48. 48. 48<br />Seat designed to pass H-point and Head Restraint Tests.<br />DOT Regulation requires head restraint within 55 mm of Oscar’s head.<br />Unique Back Posture<br />SAE Standard: “Slide the H-point machine rearward … until the seat pan contacts the seatback.”<br />
  49. 49. Seat modified for Comfort at Supplier using drive iterations.<br />
  50. 50. The production seat in Drive A did not past the H-point test.<br />H-point of Oscar<br />Seating Reference Point (SgRP)<br />Test requirement: H-point within ½” of SgRP <br />
  51. 51. The ERL modified seat in Drive B passed the H-point test.<br />H-point of Oscar<br />Seating Reference Point (SgRP)<br />Test requirement: H-point within ½” of SgRP <br />
  52. 52. Do all drivers find cars that fit? <br />“She said that when they went to look at new cars, she (she is about 5 ft 2 inch) never found a car that really fit her, but she accepted that, and chose cars by reliability, mileage, and color because she had no other choices!<br />
  53. 53. How does seat design meet all requirements including comfort? <br />
  54. 54. Driver needs to feel that the interior parts totally fit.<br />Driver:<br />Seat<br />Pedal<br />Steering Wheel<br />Vision<br />The passenger needs room for feet, knees and head!<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  55. 55. 55<br />HRMD<br />J826<br />Optimize seating at beginning of design, not at the end of development.<br />Erect<br />Vision<br />Neutral<br />Comfort<br />Space<br />Slumped<br />5th<br />95th<br />50th<br />ERL Patents: US #6,840,125, US#7,047,831, US#7,347,114, US #7,797,138, EU #1019693 & Patents Pending<br />
  56. 56. ERL’s tools in this presentation used to explain the difference between Drive A and Drive B can be used for seat design to meet H-point test, safety test, and comfort tests at the beginning of vehicle development.<br />Conclusion<br />
  57. 57. Thanks for your time and interest.<br />For more information, contact:<br />ERL LLC<br />reynolds@erlllc.com<br />517-256-3180<br />

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