Theme 5 part 2 Changing Interpretations: Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest By Melissa Skarnas
Acknowledgements <ul><li>The number 7 has deep roots and is symbolically significant in the history of the Americas to bot...
Chapter 1 – A Handful of Adventurers <ul><li>The discovery of the Americas considered history's greatest achievement, and ...
Chapter 3 – Invisible Warriors <ul><li>In 1510, the king of Spain authorized the first large shipment of African slaves – ...
Chapter 6  The Indians Are coming to an End <ul><li>Don Felipe Huaman Poma de Ayala – a descendant of the Incas, wrote a b...
Epilogue: Cuauhtemoc's Betrayal <ul><li>Cuauhtemoc, the surviving emperor of Tenochtitlan, was captured by Cortes and used...
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Theme 5 part 2 - The 7 Myths of the Spanish Conquest

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Theme 5 part 2 - Changing Interpretations: Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest

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Theme 5 part 2 - The 7 Myths of the Spanish Conquest

  1. 1. Theme 5 part 2 Changing Interpretations: Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest By Melissa Skarnas
  2. 2. Acknowledgements <ul><li>The number 7 has deep roots and is symbolically significant in the history of the Americas to both the Spanish and the Native Americans </li></ul><ul><li>Las Siete Partidas (the Seven Items)- Medieval Spanish law code during the Conquest period, and the origin myth of the Mexica included a tale of descent from 7 lineages emerging from a mythical location in the north area of Mexico </li></ul><ul><li>7 cities of gold rumoured to be in Cibola </li></ul>
  3. 3. Chapter 1 – A Handful of Adventurers <ul><li>The discovery of the Americas considered history's greatest achievement, and how this was done by just a “handful of adventurers” </li></ul><ul><li>How the discovery of the Americas and the 2 most powerful expedition leaders helped expand the conquest </li></ul><ul><li>The 7 Items (Las Siete Partidas): Use of legalistic measures to make an expedition valid; Appeal to higher authority – generally and ideally the King himself; Search for precious metals; Need to acquire native allies; Finding an interpreter; A display or theatrical use of violence; Public serizure of a native ruler </li></ul>
  4. 4. Chapter 3 – Invisible Warriors <ul><li>In 1510, the king of Spain authorized the first large shipment of African slaves – 250 to Hispaniola </li></ul><ul><li>Black slaves were at first bought for labor, but most would end up as personal auxiliaries – for Conquistadors they were armed servants, and through fighting and surviving they earned their freedom </li></ul><ul><li>The “invisible warriors” took on the form of Africans, both the free an enslaved who accompanied the Spanish invaders and would later equal or exceed them in number </li></ul><ul><li>Songs of the Aztects present the war as a local conflict between the rival city-states within the same ethnic & linguistic area </li></ul><ul><li>Cortez exploited the native rivalries, gaining allies </li></ul>
  5. 5. Chapter 6 The Indians Are coming to an End <ul><li>Don Felipe Huaman Poma de Ayala – a descendant of the Incas, wrote a book-length letter to the king of Spain – to bring attention to the declining numbers and increase of poverty of the Native Andeans </li></ul><ul><li>Myth developed on the impact of the conquest and colonization on the native Americans -of native desolation </li></ul><ul><li>Natives supposedly thought of the conquistadors as coming from the heavens – this has brought on much debate over translations of letters </li></ul><ul><li>The drop in number of the Native American population starting in 1492 has been called a holocaust and may be one of the biggest demographic disasters in human history </li></ul>
  6. 6. Epilogue: Cuauhtemoc's Betrayal <ul><li>Cuauhtemoc, the surviving emperor of Tenochtitlan, was captured by Cortes and used as a puppet ruler and used to prevent revolt in the Aztec Capitol </li></ul><ul><li>Four different perspectives of the story around Cuautemoc's death have survived: Spanish account by Cortes, Gomara and Diaz; an account by a Nahua nobleman, descendant of Coanacoch, ruler of Texcoco; Ixtilxochitl's account, based partly on the Texcoco oral tradition; and lastly Mactun Maya's own account </li></ul><ul><li>The foreigners (Cortes) stopped outside Itzamkanac, and upon their departure, Cuauhtemoc was found headless, hanging by his feet in a tree </li></ul><ul><li>Myths surrounding Cuauhtemoc's death are metaphors for all that happened and said to have happened during the Spanish invasion by the Conquistadors </li></ul>

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