Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

MAINSTREAMING INDIGENOUS FOODS: PERSPECTIVES FROM NORTHEAST INDIA

13 views

Published on

Presented by T LONGVAH,ICMR - NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NUTRITION.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

MAINSTREAMING INDIGENOUS FOODS: PERSPECTIVES FROM NORTHEAST INDIA

  1. 1. MAINSTREAMING INDIGENOUS FOODS: PERSPECTIVES FROM NORTHEAST INDIA T LONGVAH ICMR - NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NUTRITION HYDERABAD - 500007 TS, INDIA
  2. 2. CROP PRODUCTION AND SHRINKING FOOD SPECIES BIODIVERSITY • Global food production continues to grow to meet the demand from rising populations and incomes • Underutilized indigenous and traditional crop species that had previously formed the basis of local food systems has been replaced with a handful of crop choices that were higher yielding and more input intensive • Globally, out of the 391,000 documented plant species, 5,538 have been counted as human food but just three – rice, wheat and maize – provide more than 50% of the world’s plant-derived calories and 12 crops together with 5 animal species provides 75% of the world’s food today • The Global Panel on Agriculture and Food Systems for Nutrition lists poor diets as the world’s number one health risk. The agricultural system that produces the world’s food today has led to the simplification of diets over the past century and failed to meet the nutritional needs.
  3. 3. GLOBAL MALNUTRITION CHALLENGE Hungry & Undernourished people Global micronutrient deficiencies Overweight and obese population Worldwide obesity has tripled since 1975 In 2016, more than 1.9 billion adults were overweight of these 650 million were obese 41 million children under age of 5 were overweight or obese 815 million people or 10% of the world’s population are food insecure as per FAO estimates 2016 Anaemia affects 1.62 billion people which corresponds to 24.8% of the population WHO estimated that 19 million pregnant women & 250 million children are affected worldwide by vitamin A deficiency An estimated 17.3% of the world's population is at risk of inadequate zinc intake Over two billion people around the world suffer from "hidden hunger" or micronutrient deficiencies
  4. 4. BIODIVERSITY FOR FOOD AND NUTRITION BIODIVERSITY • Biodiversity contributes directly to food and nutrition security and well-being by providing a variety of plant and animal foods from domesticated and wild sources • Despite the growing evidence of biodiversity’s key role in food security and nutrition, the diversity of production systems worldwide is in decline • Northeast India falls under one of India’s two mega biodiversity hotspot. It is inhabited by various indigenous peoples’ who sources their food from their biodiverse environment • Over the ages the indigenous population have selected and conserved many wild plants as food sources perhaps after a good deal of trial and error • Each tribe source their food from within their environment and food count in each tribe can be as high as 614 The Chakhesang tribe food count
  5. 5. Diversity of foods from jhum fields Wild foods Cereals HUNDREDS! Vegetables and pulses 56 Green leafy vegetables 26 Tubers 14 Oilseeds 3 Spices 12 Species NO Fish 8 Crustacea 2 Mollusc 2 Amphibians 2 Insects 3 Foods from Paddy fields ecosystem Diversity of cereals and millets
  6. 6. 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 TELLAHAMSA TRIGUNA DRRH-3(F2SEED) SAVITRI JAYA PR-113 NDR-97 SASYASREE VARALU SALIVAHANA SONAMASURI Balckglutinous Whiteglutinous Najdainganh-Taobam ChuilonNandiMaiba DurgpatTaobam ChangngatMolphei Langmai/Daimei BungnaTaobam Nagdai-Chuilon Nagduina-Chuilon Tongnau-Nap NaganadNapdoin NepaliRice Machang High GI Low GI HIGH YIELDING LANDRACES Rice Landraces High yielding varieties N = 144 N = 104 Mean±SD Range Mean±SD Range IDF 4.47 ± 0.52 3.02-5.35 3.60 ± 0.18 3.10-3.90 SDF 0.90 ± 0.08 0.64-1.09 0.79 ± 0.06 0.66-0.96 TDF 5.37 ± 0.52 3.94-6.09 4.39 ± 0.19 3.91-4.71
  7. 7. BIODIVERSITY FOR FOOD AND NUTRITION BIODIVERSITY
  8. 8. NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CHILDREN AND ADULTS
  9. 9. BIODIVERSITY FOR FOOD AND NUTRITION BIODIVERSITY • The unintended consequence of a commercialized food system, based on a reduced number of crops, has resulted in the severe nutritional consequences around the world. • Food biodiversity is the key to ensure food security, adequate nutrition and health. This is reflected in the strikingly much better nutritional status of the indigenous people of Northeast India most of whom live in difficult circumstances with poor infrastructure • Such critical relationship however indirect reinforce the conviction that food-based strategies are key to addressing global hunger and malnutrition • Key government policies such as the Public Distribution System, Green Revolution Technologies, agriculture policies actively encouraging monocropping and discouraging jhum cultivation, migration, etc. have contributed to the changes in the food systems in Northeast India • The consequence of the changing food systems in Northeast India can pose serious public health challenges. • Therefore, food system of the indigenous people of Northeast India needs to be strengthened through policy environment and mainstreamed into the dominant national food systems for improving food and nutrition security outcomes in the country.
  10. 10. MAINSTREAMING UNDERUTLISED INDIGENOUS FOODS Including underutilized indigenous and traditional crops into the food system will increase crops diversity, improve local value chain, and diversify food system, ultimately resulting in increased household food security and improved nutrition security in the country. Several underutilized indigenous and traditional crops, have high nutritional value. Mainstreaming of underutilized indigenous and traditional crops should recognize their attributes that make them desirable. Scientific evidence of its nutritional and health benefits can bring about their incorporation into mainstream food system. Rebrand and reposition underutilized indigenous and traditional crops as an important component of a sustainable and healthy food system and important traits for breeding climate-tolerant nutritious crops Raise awareness among the general public about the importance of agrobiodiversity in healthy diets, as an increasing demand for sustainably grown products would drive the supply The current policy environment makes little mention of underutilized indigenous and traditional crops. Local agricultural systems should provide underutilized indigenous and traditional crops the attention it deserves relative to their potential. Merely getting underutilized indigenous and traditional crops onto the agenda is not enough, the resulting policies should be implemented to bring about inclusivity and equity in the food system – incorporation into National Food and Nutrition Security Policy

×