Compuware Mobility Presentation Overview

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This presentation provide a brief overview of Compuware's Mobility Center of Excellence. Compuware is enabling customers to realize the benefits of a value-driven mobile strategy by delivering commercial quality mobile applications.

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  • Tesco, the S. Korean grocery chain that places QR codes in subways to shop instead of having any physical stores.
  • Immediacy
  • Every company will be different in their strategic commitment to mobility, depending on their corporate ‘DNA’ (innovators, fast followers, etc) and the extent to which they believe that mobility will help them achieve their overall corporate objectives. Competitive Survival: At this stage, the company does not perceive mobility as a strategic imperative, but understands that a minimum level of investment is required to meet customers’ (and employees’) new expectations. Mobility investments are confined to effective ‘mobile enablement’ of existing systems and processes to maximize usability on mobile devices. Examples are: Delivering appropriate website content to popular mobile devices. (ie Support for mobile browsers) Development of mobile apps to deliver specific functionality (ie A retail bank provides account lookup and bill pay, but not a full mortgage application) Delivering internal information to employees (mobile email, etc) Because they are only effectively providing a new user interface (with no new features), investment is relatively low, and time-to-value (albeit limited) is quick. Overall objective is to keep existing customers (and employees) happy, rather than to increase ‘stickiness’ or attract new customers. This may sound very basic, but the key strategic issue here is making sure you do it right with an impressive, high-performing experience or else it could have a negative impact on revenue. If the consumer has to wait 10 secs to get to your mobile site or your app is slow to respond, they’ll move on and will not return to your brand. Significant differentiation: The company understands that mobility can provide competitive differentiation by adding new, mobile-specific features to its existing products and services or solving an existing business problem with mobility. This requires a more significant and extensive investment since these new features will also require updated functionality on the back-end systems to support them. Examples include: - Location awareness: Integration with social media (Foursquare), driving directions to nearest branch/store (retailers, banks), driver/truck location (delivery companies) Camera: Check deposit (Chase Bank), insurance claims (upload pictures of accident site & vehicles). Real-time Information: Mobile usage models (telcos), package status (delivery companies) Time-to-value is longer and more investment is required, but the potential for revenue growth is much higher. The overall objectives are to increase existing customer satisfaction and ‘stickiness’, improve existing operational processes, and incremental acquisition of new customers. Disruptive Innovation: The company views mobility as a strategic imperative and an integral part of achieving its corporate objectives. Mobility becomes their key ‘game changer’ … a way to provide its customers with an entirely new way of doing business with them. Examples include: Provide real-time, actionable information from beyond the boundaries of the device itself that was previously unavailable to either the company or their customers (ie auto industry – OnStar, Insurance trackers, etc.) Investment is high: New systems and processes have to be implemented and significant sales and marketing effort is required to educate customers and prospects and encourage adoption. This often means the creation of a new business unit dedicated to the strategy. However, the ROI is very significant. Overall objective is a significant increase in market share, new revenue streams, and increased brand awareness. Typically, companies will move through these levels until it gets to its desired level. These phases are therefore components of a mobility journey. Now, let’s make this real by talking about some examples of how companies today are executing on mobile strategies in each of these phases . . .
  • Every company will be different in their strategic commitment to mobility, depending on their corporate ‘DNA’ (innovators, fast followers, etc) and the extent to which they believe that mobility will help them achieve their overall corporate objectives. Competitive Survival: At this stage, the company does not perceive mobility as a strategic imperative, but understands that a minimum level of investment is required to meet customers’ (and employees’) new expectations. Mobility investments are confined to effective ‘mobile enablement’ of existing systems and processes to maximize usability on mobile devices. Examples are: Delivering appropriate website content to popular mobile devices. (ie Support for mobile browsers) Development of mobile apps to deliver specific functionality (ie A retail bank provides account lookup and bill pay, but not a full mortgage application) Delivering internal information to employees (mobile email, etc) Because they are only effectively providing a new user interface (with no new features), investment is relatively low, and time-to-value (albeit limited) is quick. Overall objective is to keep existing customers (and employees) happy, rather than to increase ‘stickiness’ or attract new customers. This may sound very basic, but the key strategic issue here is making sure you do it right with an impressive, high-performing experience or else it could have a negative impact on revenue. If the consumer has to wait 10 secs to get to your mobile site or your app is slow to respond, they’ll move on and will not return to your brand. Significant differentiation: The company understands that mobility can provide competitive differentiation by adding new, mobile-specific features to its existing products and services or solving an existing business problem with mobility. This requires a more significant and extensive investment since these new features will also require updated functionality on the back-end systems to support them. Examples include: - Location awareness: Integration with social media (Foursquare), driving directions to nearest branch/store (retailers, banks), driver/truck location (delivery companies) Camera: Check deposit (Chase Bank), insurance claims (upload pictures of accident site & vehicles). Real-time Information: Mobile usage models (telcos), package status (delivery companies) Time-to-value is longer and more investment is required, but the potential for revenue growth is much higher. The overall objectives are to increase existing customer satisfaction and ‘stickiness’, improve existing operational processes, and incremental acquisition of new customers. Disruptive Innovation: The company views mobility as a strategic imperative and an integral part of achieving its corporate objectives. Mobility becomes their key ‘game changer’ … a way to provide its customers with an entirely new way of doing business with them. Examples include: Provide real-time, actionable information from beyond the boundaries of the device itself that was previously unavailable to either the company or their customers (ie auto industry – OnStar, Insurance trackers, etc.) Investment is high: New systems and processes have to be implemented and significant sales and marketing effort is required to educate customers and prospects and encourage adoption. This often means the creation of a new business unit dedicated to the strategy. However, the ROI is very significant. Overall objective is a significant increase in market share, new revenue streams, and increased brand awareness. Typically, companies will move through these levels until it gets to its desired level. These phases are therefore components of a mobility journey. Now, let’s make this real by talking about some examples of how companies today are executing on mobile strategies in each of these phases . . .
  • Every company will be different in their strategic commitment to mobility, depending on their corporate ‘DNA’ (innovators, fast followers, etc) and the extent to which they believe that mobility will help them achieve their overall corporate objectives. Competitive Survival: At this stage, the company does not perceive mobility as a strategic imperative, but understands that a minimum level of investment is required to meet customers’ (and employees’) new expectations. Mobility investments are confined to effective ‘mobile enablement’ of existing systems and processes to maximize usability on mobile devices. Examples are: Delivering appropriate website content to popular mobile devices. (ie Support for mobile browsers) Development of mobile apps to deliver specific functionality (ie A retail bank provides account lookup and bill pay, but not a full mortgage application) Delivering internal information to employees (mobile email, etc) Because they are only effectively providing a new user interface (with no new features), investment is relatively low, and time-to-value (albeit limited) is quick. Overall objective is to keep existing customers (and employees) happy, rather than to increase ‘stickiness’ or attract new customers. This may sound very basic, but the key strategic issue here is making sure you do it right with an impressive, high-performing experience or else it could have a negative impact on revenue. If the consumer has to wait 10 secs to get to your mobile site or your app is slow to respond, they’ll move on and will not return to your brand. Significant differentiation: The company understands that mobility can provide competitive differentiation by adding new, mobile-specific features to its existing products and services or solving an existing business problem with mobility. This requires a more significant and extensive investment since these new features will also require updated functionality on the back-end systems to support them. Examples include: - Location awareness: Integration with social media (Foursquare), driving directions to nearest branch/store (retailers, banks), driver/truck location (delivery companies) Camera: Check deposit (Chase Bank), insurance claims (upload pictures of accident site & vehicles). Real-time Information: Mobile usage models (telcos), package status (delivery companies) Time-to-value is longer and more investment is required, but the potential for revenue growth is much higher. The overall objectives are to increase existing customer satisfaction and ‘stickiness’, improve existing operational processes, and incremental acquisition of new customers. Disruptive Innovation: The company views mobility as a strategic imperative and an integral part of achieving its corporate objectives. Mobility becomes their key ‘game changer’ … a way to provide its customers with an entirely new way of doing business with them. Examples include: Provide real-time, actionable information from beyond the boundaries of the device itself that was previously unavailable to either the company or their customers (ie auto industry – OnStar, Insurance trackers, etc.) Investment is high: New systems and processes have to be implemented and significant sales and marketing effort is required to educate customers and prospects and encourage adoption. This often means the creation of a new business unit dedicated to the strategy. However, the ROI is very significant. Overall objective is a significant increase in market share, new revenue streams, and increased brand awareness. Typically, companies will move through these levels until it gets to its desired level. These phases are therefore components of a mobility journey. Now, let’s make this real by talking about some examples of how companies today are executing on mobile strategies in each of these phases . . .
  • This is an illustration of the mobile system
  • Tesco, the S. Korean grocery chain that places QR codes in subways to shop instead of having any physical stores.
  • Compuware Mobility Presentation Overview

    1. 1. Compuware Mobile Center ofExcellence OverviewSeptember 16, 2011
    2. 2. Agenda • Compuware Company Overview • Mobile Computing Strategy and Case Studies • Mobile Center of Excellence Overview • Partnerships2
    3. 3. Compuware Highlights History of Success • 38 years delivering IT value • 80 offices worldwide World-Class Customers • 7,100+ customers across every market • 46 of the top 50 Fortune 500 companies • 12 of top 20 U.S. websites Rock-Solid Financials • $900M in revenue • No long-term debt • $200M operating cash flow in FY ’11 Compuware Headquarters – Downtown Detroit 3© 2011 Compuware Corporation
    4. 4. Professional Services Organization SALES SUPPORT Geographic Sales Centers of Excellence Sales/Delivery & Delivery Michigan Mobile Computing Corporate Practice Directors Midwest Application Performance Global Delivery Organization Management (APM) Northeast Southeast West 4© 2011 Compuware Corporation
    5. 5. Mobile ComputingStrategy and CaseStudies5
    6. 6. “What happens if I get it wrong?”A tale of two companies: Blockbuster and NetflixNetflix: To become the largest movierental service in the world via the Internet NetflixBoth were price dropdisruptiveinnovators Begins running original Streaming content Streaming goes service mobile launch Launched online rental service Chapter 11 Eliminates “unprofitable” online service Eliminates late fees in stores Rolls outBlockbuster: To become the largest kiosksmovie rental service in the world viabrick-and-mortar stores
    7. 7. The next wave of IT is being driven by consumers7
    8. 8. Mobility is big and complex PC and laptop market: Smartphone and tablet market: Dominated by one standard; driven by business Highly fragmented; driven by consumers Wired Homogenous Business-driven Global Unit Shipments – 2010  2015 (est.) Global Data Volume – 2010  2015 (est.) Wireless Heterogenous Consumer-driven8
    9. 9. Mobile Internet Ever More Important • Morgan Stanley predicts global mobile users will outnumber desktop internet users within 3 years Global Mobile vs. Desktop Internet User Projection, 2007 - 2015 2000 1800 Desktop Users 1600 Mobile UsersInternet Users (MM) 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 9 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Source: Mary Meeker, Morgan Stanley Source: Mary Meeker, Morgan Stanley
    10. 10. Mobility is growing at lightning speed downloads from Apple’s App Store in less than three years of total global mobile data traffic comes from YouTube users accessing Facebook through their mobile devices10
    11. 11. Mobility is expanding Machine-to-Machine Communication growth of M2M market 2010-2016 m-Commerce spent via mobile payments in 201111
    12. 12. What is the opportunity? Mercatus Study reveals banks can improve customer acquisition by up to sixty percent “Mobile financial service capabilities were more impactful in a consumers decision to select a bank than availability of online banking, access to ATMs, or nearby branches.”12
    13. 13. What is the opportunity? More than three times the mobile gross Aberdeen Consulting also found that companies merchandise value in 2009 and considerably "Thereal benefit to ustheir field service improved who automated is that mobile banking more than its projected total of $1.5 billion. their SLA compliance by 22.1 percent. customers are more profitable, theyre stickier, they transact more often, they become loyal to SunTrust and they migrate transactions to a lower cost channel.” — Kristen Rankin, VP and Mobile Channel Manager, SunTrust Banks Inc. Mercatus Study reveals banks can improve customer acquisition by up to sixty percent “Mobile financial service capabilities were more impactful in a consumers decision to select a bank than availability of online banking, access to ATMs, or nearby branches.”13
    14. 14. So what does this mean to you? Mobility represents a fundamental and irreversible change: Your consumers decide how, when and where they connect with you. What’s your strategy for addressing this new challenge?14
    15. 15. Meet your new (global) consumer you to understand my needs, not sell to me.” to access my data to receive information anywhere, anytime.” that’s relevant to me.” to use any device an engaging, rich that I choose.” media experience.” Independent of geography and demographics15
    16. 16. End-Users’ Mobile Experience Expectations Are Increasing
    17. 17. Implementing a mobility strategy Get in the game • Deliver appropriate web-site content to popular mobile devices • Develop mobile apps to deliver specific functionality • Deliver internal information to employees GET IN THE GAME17
    18. 18. Getting in the game OPPORTUNITY In the wake of decreased tourism, make residents and visitors feel comfortable and increase their awareness of what Detroit has to offer MOBILITY STRATEGY Create a mobile app that has accessible design, key value-add information and impressive performance BUSINESS VALUE Detroit now has an easy way to promote tourism and capture contact information for repeat promotion18
    19. 19. Implementing a mobility strategyGet ahead of the game Get ahead of the game • Look for ways to solve existing problems and differentiate • Location awareness: Integrate with social media, driving directions, driver/truck location • Camera: Check deposit, on-site insurance claims • Real-time Information: Mobile usage models, package status GET IN GET AHEAD THE GAME OF THE GAME 19
    20. 20. Getting ahead of the game OPPORTUNITY EMT drivers were taking patients to the closest ER, regardless of wait time MOBILITY STRATEGY Create a way for EMT drivers to know Crittenton ER wait time and provide direction/routing services BUSINESS VALUE Providing capability to EMT drivers increased ER traffic, resulting in increased hospital revenue20
    21. 21. Implementing a mobility strategy Change the game Change the game • Leverage mobility to provide a new connection point to consumers GET IN GET AHEAD CHANGE THE GAME OF THE GAME THE GAME21
    22. 22. Changing the gameOPPORTUNITY Wanted to create a differentiated service for consumers that would improve driver safety and vehicle salesMOBILITY STRATEGY Develop M2M infrastructure to get valuable information from automobiles wirelessly Create value-add mobility apps for remote functionality like car start and unlockBUSINESS VALUE Provided consumers a unique capability that increased consideration of GM cars in the sales cycle Consumer retention/brand loyalty improved due to access to this functionality22
    23. 23. Implementing a mobility strategy - Options Leverage an Industry Leader Partner with smaller firm(s) Build In-House GET IN GET AHEAD CHANGE THE GAME OF THE GAME THE GAME23
    24. 24. Why Compuware? In-House Small Firm Industry Leader• Total Control • Time to Market • Scalability• Resource Allocation • No Investment in • Early to Market• Generating Domain Expertise Resources • Multi-Platform Expertise • Potential Scalability • Performance Tested • Adaptive Agile Can I scale? Can I keep pace Can they scale • Enterprise Integrator with technology? Will they be in to meet business in our demands? 3 years? 24
    25. 25. Mobile Center ofExcellence Overview25
    26. 26. Mobile CoE Leadership TeamGovernance Sponsor Bob Kennedy Business Enterprise User Technical Delivery & Program Development Mobility Experience Solution Operations Management Allan John Jeff James Glen Nailesh Techko Kinnamon Von Buskirk Brown Goldman Shah26
    27. 27. Mobile Computing Overview Adaptive Agile Development M2M Enterprise Data Cloud Services Security Mobile Platforms Emerging Technologies Social Networking Media and Applications Performance27
    28. 28. Adaptive Agile Development Evolving Design Predictive Design Map v1 v2 v3 v4 Final Predicted Behavior and Usage Performance Security Technology Market Climate Actual Evolving Design Map28
    29. 29. Adaptive Agile Development Mobile Solution Approach Timeline Approach Foundational AspirationalMobile Architecture Maturity Security v1 v2 v3 v4 PerformanceBack End Systems Mobile Innovation Process Framework Basic Dedicated Enhanced EnhancedClient Solution Services Services Services I Services II Mobile Readiness • Advanced UI • Assessment • UX Brand • Unique User • Advanced UI Design Data • Functions • Functions • Optimization • Data Management • Adoption • Proprietary • Security • Security • Cleansing • Translation Systems • Performance • Performance • Business Process • Functions Absorption 29
    30. 30. Adaptive Agile Development Mobile Innovation Network Idea Management Innovation Planning Innovation Planning Innovation Proof Innovation Proof Idea Fulfillment Idea Fulfillment • Mobility Objectives • Usability Alternatives • Proof Definition • Acceptance CriteriaAssessment Release • Business Benefits • Technology Alignment • Build Proof • Architecture Approval • Establish Metrics • Performance Measures • Analytics Established • Service Deployed • Risk Mitigation • Identify Cost Drivers • Evaluate & Measure • Service Management • Innovation Initiatives • Prioritize Initiatives • Deployment Plan • Analytics/Reporting 5-10 days 5 -15 days 2 – 4 Weeks 8+ Weeks Business Alignment Prioritization Approval Production Customer Stakeholders 30
    31. 31. Partnerships31
    32. 32. Partnerships are Essential for Success Marketing Firms •Branding •Campaigns •Social Networking •Platforms Mobile Device Wireless Providers Management •Network •Solutions Compuware (MDM) Providers •Device Management •M2M Framework •App Stores Customers •Mobile Strategy •Requirements •Funding32
    33. 33. A World of Opportunity33

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