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8 July 2015: Persistent surveillance from the air themed competition

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Presentations from 8 July 2015 CDE Innovation Network event. For more information see: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/cde-innovation-network-event-with-uk-defence-solutions-centre

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8 July 2015: Persistent surveillance from the air themed competition

  1. 1. Persistent surveillance from the air © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  2. 2. What do we mean by persistent surveillance? • Observation for extended period of time (weeks or even months) • The means to collect, process and communicate data and information • Enable the ‘pattern-of-life’ analysis and anomaly detection • Enhanced situational awareness © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  3. 3. Why is persistent surveillance important? • Needed to operate with situational understanding • To support the decision maker both at the strategic and tactical level • Future operations will need a greater level of persistence and discrimination © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  4. 4. Current levels of persistence • Surface platforms provide operational information over small areas • Manned airborne platforms have limited ‘time on station’ • Space surveillance provides global coverage but limited dwell time • Large remotely piloted aircraft are expensive and difficult to task © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  5. 5. Barriers to persistent surveillance • Size, weight and power (SWAP) constraints on sensor payloads • Proprietary architectures and interfaces stifle innovation and drive up cost © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  6. 6. Barriers to persistent surveillance • Huge volumes of data • Secure and persistent communication bandwidth • Cognitive burden © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  7. 7. Technology challenges This CDE themed competition seeks innovative sensor and communications technologies to enable persistent surveillance from the air Focus on sensor, processing and communications sub-systems, not the platform © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  8. 8. In scope • Sensor, processing and communications packages compatible with long-endurance air platforms: – high-altitude pseudo-satellites (HAPS) – long-endurance mini remotely piloted aircraft – perch-and-stare (energy harvesting) miniature aircraft – Lighter-than-air platforms – high-altitude and medium-altitude long- endurance aircraft (HALE and MALE) © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  9. 9. Out of scope • Airborne surveillance using large, heavy sensors • Space-based earth observation • Persistent surveillance from the land and at sea © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  10. 10. Technical challenges using high-altitude pseudo-satellites as an example platform • Altitude: up to 23 km • Average power available: < 50 watts • Weight: 3 kg desirable, <4 kg essential © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  11. 11. • Size constraint for sensor package: volume < 25 litres • Maximum length of a single antenna 25 metres • Time over target: up to 1000 hours (40 days) © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015 Technical challenges using high-altitude pseudo-satellites as an example platform
  12. 12. • Ambient temperature: ~-70 to +40 Celsius • Ambient pressure: ~20 to 1000 millibar © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015 Technical challenges using high-altitude pseudo-satellites as an example platform
  13. 13. Challenge 1: sensor technologies • New sensor technologies that can capture intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance information from HAPS, or similar, platforms – innovative single sensor types – networked array of sensors and communication nodes © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  14. 14. Example areas of potential interest for electro-optical / infrared technology • High performance/operating temperature thermal imaging • Multi-band sensing • Novel optical materials and designs • Low mass pointing and stabilisation © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  15. 15. Example areas of potential interest for radio-frequency technology • Networked sensors for: – wider area – ‘divide and conquer’ – higher precision location/tracking – greater resilience • Modular scalable lightweight conformal antennas – phased arrays to avoid moving parts – wideband to allow multiple functions © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  16. 16. Example areas of potential interest for processing • Exploitation of low power off-the-shelf processing • Sparse sampling and compressive sensing • Sensor data to information closed feedback loop © Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  17. 17. Challenge 2: sensor communication networks • For maximum persistence, the sensor and communication channels can’t be considered in isolation • Remember, the goal is to provide the decision maker with timely, trustworthy information that can be acted on OFFICIAL© Crown copyright 2014 Dstl 10 July 2015
  18. 18. Challenge 2: sensor communication networks • Focus on integrity and availability exploiting network for resilience and redundancy • How can the network cooperate to minimize power? • Can sensor functionality and data compression be optimized for low power communication? OFFICIAL© Crown copyright 2014 Dstl 10 July 2015
  19. 19. Challenge 2: sensor communication networks • Information management to shape and filter network traffic • Novel communication bearers – civilian networks (including the internet) – hybrid RF/EO links – exploitation of sensor as a communication channel • Novel spectrum management, reuse, sharing and robust to interference OFFICIAL© Crown copyright 2014 Dstl 10 July 2015
  20. 20. Your proposal should: • describe how the proposed technologies will operate • consider the trade-off between size, weight, power and cost and overall performance • indicate the class of airborne, persistent platform that could be applicable OFFICIAL© Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  21. 21. Your proposal should: • outline the standards and high- level architecture to which the concept is designed • consider systems and implementation issues • include an outline of the future work required to fully develop your solution OFFICIAL© Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  22. 22. For challenge 1 your proposal should: • indicate range and resolution that could be achieved • describe the information output, processing requirements and quantity of data • consider the bandwidth requirements • discuss the novelty and technical risk OFFICIAL© Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  23. 23. For challenge 2 your proposal should: • detail the technical approach • capture the novelty and innovation • indicate the range, bandwidth and potential limitations • explain how power will be managed and minimized across the network OFFICIAL© Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015
  24. 24. Innovation Network event 8 July 2015
  25. 25. High-altitude persistent surveillance UK Defence Solutions Centre
  26. 26. Page 26 Export potential •Global addressable Unmanned Air Systems market from 2014-2035 •Land surveillance market is £11.6B •Maritime surveillance is £5B •Target markets •West Europe •Far East & Pacific •South East Asia •Middle East
  27. 27. Page 27 Border security Image © Airbus Defence and Space Image © PRWatch.org Image © Airbus Defence and Space Image © Airbus Defence and Space
  28. 28. Page 28 Maritime security Image © Airbus Defence and Space Image © USDOD JSTARS
  29. 29. Page 29 High-value asset protection
  30. 30. Page 30 High-Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) UAS Image © Airbus Defence and Space
  31. 31. Page 31 HALE UAS Image © NASA JPL Image © Titan Aerospace Image © worldunderwatch Image © Airbus Defence and Space
  32. 32. Page 32 High Altitude Pseudo Satellites (HAPS) Image © Airbus Defence and Space
  33. 33. Page 33 Challenge 1 – sensor technologies Image © USDOD JSTARS Image © Airbus Defence and Space
  34. 34. Page 34 Challenge 2 – sensor communications networks Image © Titan Aerospace Image © Google Image © Google
  35. 35. Page 35 Concluding thoughts • Benchmark performance • 50cm real time HD video • 2kg weight including gimbal, zoom & control • Addressing airborne and satellite surveillance markets • Unique persistence • Lower operational costs than an aircraft • Lower capital costs than a satellite Images © Airbus Defence and Space
  36. 36. Innovation Network event 8 July 2015
  37. 37. Summary • Novel technologies and approaches to support persistent surveillance from the air under severe SWAP constraints • Challenge 1 focussed towards the sensor and low power processing opportunities • Challenge 2 focussed towards the optimisation of the communications network • Complementary approaches will be favoured OFFICIAL© Crown copyright 2015 Dstl 10 July 2015

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