National History Day
Program Overview
Participation
• Junior Division
– 6th
- 8th
Grade
• Senior Division
– 9th
- 12th
Grade
• Students can work individually or...
Classroom Implementation
National History Day offers flexibility to fit any
classroom:
• Full classroom implementation
• E...
Annual Theme
• 2011: Debate and Diplomacy in History
• 2012: Revolution, Reaction, Reform in History
• 2013: Turning Point...
Topic Selection
• World History
• American History
• State History
• Local History
• Family History
• The only requirement...
In-depth Research
• Students are encouraged to explore their
community resources as a means to
discover their topic.
– Loc...
Presentation
• Historical Paper (individual only)
• Exhibit
• Documentary
• Performance
• Website
• All categories are req...
Historical Papers
A written demonstration of history based on the most
traditional form of historical presentation: author...
Exhibits A visual presentation of history
based on the work of museum
curators and exhibit designers
Documentaries
A multi-media presentation
modeled after the work of
directors like Ken Burns
Performances
A live presentation
modeled after living history
interpreters
Websites
A computer-based project
modeled after the presentation of
history on the World Wide Web
The Contest
Regional Events:
Defined by ECSU boundaries, contests occur
throughout the month of March
State Event:
Univers...
Assessment
• At NHD events, students
present before a panel of
judges who are asked to
assess:
– Historical Quality
– Rela...
Historical Quality
Relationship to Theme
Clarity of Presentation
(Paper Sample)
Student Benefits
• Skill development in:
– Research/Reading
– Analysis
– Drawing Conclusions
– Writing
– Presentation
– Co...
Teacher Services
• Curriculum materials
– Curriculum videos
– Sample project videos
– Theme materials
• Program-based work...
Teacher Services (cont)
• Assistance from the State NHD office
– History Day Hotline
– History Center Library Help Desk
– ...
Teacher Benefits
An innovative teaching tool that…
• Meets state standards
• Encompasses several skill sets
• Encourages c...
Getting Started…
• Visit www.mnhs.org/historyday
– Request Information
• An information request will generate a basic pack...
Contest Participation
• Participation Survey
– A participation survey will be sent to enrolled
teachers in January request...
Debate and Diplomacy in
History: Successes,
Failures, Consequences
• Brand-new theme
• Students can choose to focus on deb...
Debate and Diplomacy in
History: Successes,
Failures, Consequences
• Debate:
– A discussion involving opposing points, an
...
Debate and Diplomacy
Interpretations
• Debate
– To be a debate, a topic needs to be more complex than a
disagreement
– Deb...
Debate and Diplomacy
Interpretations
• Debate: Modern Debates
– Modern debated issues: Find the origin or similar
topics i...
Debate and Diplomacy
Interpretations
• Diplomacy:
– Generally, diplomacy is defined as international
relations. Example: C...
Cautions About D & D
• This is not the debate team!
– Students are not part of the argument and should not
be projecting o...
Significance of D & D
• Each topic should have demonstrable
historical significance
– Product debates (New Coke v. Classic...
Thinking Outside the Box
• Students should consider ideological debates instead of
physical debates
– Example: Physical Li...
Topics to Consider…
• Declaration of Independence
• 15th
Amendment exclusion of women
• Brown v. Board of Education
• Indi...
Minnesota Topics
• Minnesota Eugenics Society
• Creation of Chippewa National Forest
• Boundary Waters Canoe Area
• Traver...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Intro to History Day and Debate/Diplomacy

641 views

Published on

A brief introduction to the History Day program, with a discussion of the 2011 theme, "Debate and Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences."

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
641
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Intro to History Day and Debate/Diplomacy

  1. 1. National History Day Program Overview
  2. 2. Participation • Junior Division – 6th - 8th Grade • Senior Division – 9th - 12th Grade • Students can work individually or collaboratively in groups of 2-5.
  3. 3. Classroom Implementation National History Day offers flexibility to fit any classroom: • Full classroom implementation • Elected pull-out program (gifted & talented) • After-school activity
  4. 4. Annual Theme • 2011: Debate and Diplomacy in History • 2012: Revolution, Reaction, Reform in History • 2013: Turning Points in History • 2014: Geography in History • 2015: Rights & Responsibilities in History
  5. 5. Topic Selection • World History • American History • State History • Local History • Family History • The only requirement is that students identify their topic’s relationship to the theme
  6. 6. In-depth Research • Students are encouraged to explore their community resources as a means to discover their topic. – Local Libraries – University Libraries – Archives – Historic Sites – Witnesses
  7. 7. Presentation • Historical Paper (individual only) • Exhibit • Documentary • Performance • Website • All categories are required to submit an annotated bibliography of sources used during the development of their project
  8. 8. Historical Papers A written demonstration of history based on the most traditional form of historical presentation: authorship
  9. 9. Exhibits A visual presentation of history based on the work of museum curators and exhibit designers
  10. 10. Documentaries A multi-media presentation modeled after the work of directors like Ken Burns
  11. 11. Performances A live presentation modeled after living history interpreters
  12. 12. Websites A computer-based project modeled after the presentation of history on the World Wide Web
  13. 13. The Contest Regional Events: Defined by ECSU boundaries, contests occur throughout the month of March State Event: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities May 1, 2011 National Event: Univ. of MD, College Park June, 2011 School Events: Take place in individual schools, organized by a lead teacher or coordinator—generally occur in February
  14. 14. Assessment • At NHD events, students present before a panel of judges who are asked to assess: – Historical Quality – Relationship to the Theme – Clarity of Presentation • Students receive feedback from judges on their work following each event • Those who advance in the competition are highly encouraged to revisit and revise their work
  15. 15. Historical Quality
  16. 16. Relationship to Theme
  17. 17. Clarity of Presentation (Paper Sample)
  18. 18. Student Benefits • Skill development in: – Research/Reading – Analysis – Drawing Conclusions – Writing – Presentation – Communication – Collaboration – Understanding Historical Context/Perspective • Scholarships • College/Workplace preparation • A greater sense of connection to history and community
  19. 19. Teacher Services • Curriculum materials – Curriculum videos – Sample project videos – Theme materials • Program-based workshops – Introductory sessions – Advanced category-based training – Mentor assistance – National summer institutes • Online Tools – Master Teacher Network http://www.mnhs.org/school/historyday/masterteacher/index.htm – Sample topic ideas & Research links http://www.mnhs.org/school/historyday/program/relatedwebsites_2.htm
  20. 20. Teacher Services (cont) • Assistance from the State NHD office – History Day Hotline – History Center Library Help Desk – Classroom visits – Staff assistance via phone and e-mail • Free adhesive products
  21. 21. Teacher Benefits An innovative teaching tool that… • Meets state standards • Encompasses several skill sets • Encourages cross-curricular collaboration • Inspires and motivates young people • Fosters opportunities to participate in teacher training • Recognizes superior teaching at State and National events
  22. 22. Getting Started… • Visit www.mnhs.org/historyday – Request Information • An information request will generate a basic packet of materials, but does not commit you to active participation. – Enroll as an active teacher • Enrolling indicates that you would like to receive program mailings, intend to participate with students, and are interested in staff assistance. • If you are interested in classroom visits and/or participating in the contest, you must enroll.
  23. 23. Contest Participation • Participation Survey – A participation survey will be sent to enrolled teachers in January requesting the total number of projects participating in each category per school. – Teachers interested in entering projects in the contest must submit a completed survey in order to receive registration information.
  24. 24. Debate and Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences • Brand-new theme • Students can choose to focus on debate, diplomacy or both – Many topics will have elements of both. Example: Three-Fifths Compromise • Encourage students to consider both debate and diplomacy as they choose topics
  25. 25. Debate and Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences • Debate: – A discussion involving opposing points, an argument – A formal contest in which the opposing sides are advocated by speakers • Diplomacy: – The art and practice of conducting negotiations between nations, as in alliances and treaties – The conduct of the relations of one state in dealing with another by peaceful means
  26. 26. Debate and Diplomacy Interpretations • Debate – To be a debate, a topic needs to be more complex than a disagreement – Debate implies large issues, long-term discussion of opposing sides, and impactful consequences – For example, students and teachers can disagree about school dress code, but can debate about students’ rights to use dress as a method of free speech (Tinker v. Des Moines, 1969)
  27. 27. Debate and Diplomacy Interpretations • Debate: Modern Debates – Modern debated issues: Find the origin or similar topics in the past – Current debate may become part of the impact, but define the debate in historical terms – For example: Gays in the military • Women in the military, women in combat • Blacks in the military, segregated regiments • Compulsory draft, conscientious objectors • Young people in war, unable to vote • 1942 ban of homosexuals in military
  28. 28. Debate and Diplomacy Interpretations • Diplomacy: – Generally, diplomacy is defined as international relations. Example: Camp David Accords – But diplomacy can also be conducted by sovereign nations, nations in a civil war, within governments, or between defined interest groups – Define diplomacy as an organized gathering with a resolution in mind. Example: Appomattox
  29. 29. Cautions About D & D • This is not the debate team! – Students are not part of the argument and should not be projecting opinions (especially difficult with controversial topics such as abortion and animal rights) • It is necessary to address both sides of the debate – In order for it to be a debate, there must be two or more sides. All must be present. Example: the debate over slavery
  30. 30. Significance of D & D • Each topic should have demonstrable historical significance – Product debates (New Coke v. Classic Coke), celebrity debates (should Childress have waived Randy Moss) are not necessarily significant • Use the postscript “Successes, Failures, Consequences” to determine significance • National topics can have local significance and vice versa – Example: American Indian treaties and policies
  31. 31. Thinking Outside the Box • Students should consider ideological debates instead of physical debates – Example: Physical Lincoln/Douglas debates v. • Debates can take place outside of the political arena – Example: Religious debates (birth of Protestantism); scientific debates (Scopes Monkey Trial); literary debates (banned books) • Find a topic that has been debated and narrow to a specific time or action – Example: Women’s suffrage, immigration, free press = suffragette methods, Chinese Exclusion Act, Zenger trial
  32. 32. Topics to Consider… • Declaration of Independence • 15th Amendment exclusion of women • Brown v. Board of Education • Indian boarding schools • 1968 Olympic Games • Iran Hostage Crisis • 1920s fashion • Loving v. Virginia
  33. 33. Minnesota Topics • Minnesota Eugenics Society • Creation of Chippewa National Forest • Boundary Waters Canoe Area • Traverse des Sioux Treaty • Commission of Public Safety • 1934 truckers’ strike • Rondo and I-94 • The Grange

×