HD Judge Training 2011

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HD Judge Training 2011

  1. 1. History Day in Minnesota<br />Judges’ Training<br />
  2. 2. Debate & Diplomacy in History<br />Debate and/OR Diplomacy<br />Successes, Failures, Consequences = IMPACT<br />A historical debate, not the defense of a personal position.<br />An even divide of perspectives is not necessary, but we need to know where the Debate/Diplomacy is and what conclusions can be drawn from them.<br />
  3. 3. Judging Criteria: Historical Quality<br />
  4. 4. Central Argument: The Thesis<br />The thesis statement should provide: <br />the basic who, what, when, and where.<br />the topic’s relationship to the theme “Debate & Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures Consequences.”<br />where is the debate/diplomacy?<br />what historical perspectives are clashing?<br />an explanation on why the topic is significant in history.<br />how did this debate/diplomacy lead to successes, failures, and/or consequences?<br />why is it important?<br />an argument that can be supported with evidence.<br />
  5. 5. Central Argument: The Thesis<br />Be wary of “if not for this, than that” or “what if” analysis.<br />Have students supported their claims with evidence?<br />What is the theme?<br />2009 The Individual in History: Actions and Legacies Example<br />
  6. 6. Central Argument: The Thesis<br /><ul><li>Look for a thesis statement that contains:
  7. 7. A connection to the annual theme
  8. 8. A clear argument that can be supported with evidence
  9. 9. A statement of impact</li></ul>2008 Conflict and Compromise Example<br />
  10. 10. The Annotated Bibliography<br />By the Rules: <br />Primary and secondary sources separated<br />MLA or Turabian/Chicago Style citations<br />Annotations that explain:<br />how the source was used.<br />how the source helped in student understanding. <br />why it is listed as primary if it is a “gray area” source.<br />
  11. 11. The Annotated Bibliography<br />Primary vs. Secondary Sources<br />Primary: Sources that are created during or a product of the time period being researched. Raw materials that require students to draw their own conclusions. Includes: <br />Witnesses<br />Diaries<br />Letters<br />Documents<br />Newspaper Articles<br />Secondary: Sources created through research that include an author’s own analysis and interpretation.<br />
  12. 12. The Annotated Bibliography<br />Things to look for: <br />Are the primary sources really primary?<br />Are the listed sources providing students with a wide spectrum of information?<br />How reliable do the materials appear?<br />www.worldofquotes.com vs. www.nara.gov<br />Has the student located a reasonable number of sources based on their topic?<br />
  13. 13. Judging Criteria: Relation to Theme<br />Debate & Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences<br />
  14. 14. Judging Criteria: Clarity of Presentation<br />(Paper Sample)<br />

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