Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

gartner-market-trends-revenue-opportunities-for-telecom-carriers

2,083 views

Published on

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

gartner-market-trends-revenue-opportunities-for-telecom-carriers

  1. 1. Market Analysis and Statistics G00216504 Market Trends: New Revenue Opportunities for Telecom Carriers in 2015 Published: 14 September 2011 Analyst(s): King-Yew Foong, Jean-Claude Delcroix This report identifies the business potential of non-traditional services beyond telecom in 2015, and assesses how much revenue each of them will generate. It also provides an estimate of the portion of revenue that telecom carriers can reasonably capture in those markets, in addition to overall market trends and the challenges that carriers face. Key Findings ■ On average, nontraditional services are expected to generate revenue amounting to 8.1% of worldwide traditional telecom services revenue in 2015. However, an aggressive and ambitious telecom carrier can raise this figure to between 15% and 20%. ■ On average, earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) from nontraditional services will amount to 4.0% of worldwide traditional telecom services EBIT in 2015. ■ Telecom carriers worldwide are forming alliances among themselves and collaborating more in the face of growing competition from nontraditional competitors that are strengthening their platforms and ecosystems. ■ No single nontraditional service will be able to compensate for the erosion in traditional telecom revenue. Media/entertainment (including advertising), machine-to-machine (M2M) services, cloud computing and IT services are promising areas for generating revenue. Recommendations ■ Telecom carriers will have to lower their operating expenses for traditional telecom services to maximize free cash flow, which can be invested in nontraditional services. ■ Telecom carriers need to focus on operating efficiencies when offering a suite of nontraditional services, as there are no "killer" applications.
  2. 2. ■ To maximize their opportunities with nontraditional services, telecom carriers should develop a deep knowledge of consumer preferences and trends, and demonstrate an understanding of other industry verticals. Table of Contents Trends in the Market..............................................................................................................................2 Market: Telecom Carriers Worldwide Are Increasingly Looking Beyond Traditional Telecom...................5 How Has the Market Changed Between 2009 and 2011?................................................................5 2011 and Beyond — What Can Telecom Carriers Look Forward To?...............................................6 Nontraditional Services — Challenges Confronting Telecom Carriers................................................7 How Much Can Telecom Carriers Reasonably Capture?..................................................................7 Contrarian View: If Telecom Carriers Aggressively Redefine Their Business, These Trends Will Change ............................................................................................................................................................11 Vendors to Watch................................................................................................................................12 Conclusions.........................................................................................................................................12 Acknowledgements........................................................................................................................13 Appendix: Methodology..................................................................................................................13 Market Segments.....................................................................................................................13 Revenue and Growth Rates......................................................................................................13 Profit Margin.............................................................................................................................13 Recommended Reading.......................................................................................................................14 List of Tables Table 1. Telecom Carriers' Share of Nontraditional Service Revenue and EBIT, 2015.............................8 List of Figures Figure 1. Strategic Mapping of Market Opportunities, Worldwide (Billions of Dollars)...............................4 Figure 2. Worldwide Telecom Carriers — Distribution of Service Revenue in 2015................................10 Figure 3. Worldwide Telecom Carriers - Distribution of EBIT in 2015.....................................................11 Trends in the Market Worldwide, there is a growing trend for telecom carriers (see Note 1) to pursue opportunities outside the traditional telecommunications domain. This report identifies the nontraditional services that Page 2 of 16 Gartner, Inc. | G00216504
  3. 3. telecom carriers can reasonably pursue to increase their revenue. It is an update of the report "Dataquest Insight: New Revenue Opportunities for Telecom Carriers, 2013," which was published on 8 October 2009. We have updated our strategic map of major new market opportunities and contrasted them with traditional telecom services, such as consumer and enterprise voice, mobile voice, consumer fixed broadband and messaging (see Figure 1). The size of each bubble represents the global market segment revenue in 2015 available to all interested participants. By plotting the projected EBIT margin for 2015 against the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for 2011 to 2015 on a single chart, we can gauge the market opportunity (for all interested parties), and the business impact of each nontraditional service on telecom carriers' financial performance. Our methodology is summarized in the Appendix. Key changes in this update: We have combined online and mobile music, and we have scaled down our 2015 projection for online music due to piracy and unauthorized copying, which have a negative impact on revenue. The revenue for mobile TV in 2015 has also been reduced due to the fragmentation of technology standards, alternative means of viewing video and content, and a lack of viable business models. Revenue from consumer location-based services has been reduced, because the revenue portion derived from advertising is counted under mobile advertising. We have provided more visibility on IT services, which now include consulting, development and integration, IT management, process management, software support and hardware support. The cloud computing segment has been expanded to include business process services (excluding advertising), systems infrastructure, applications infrastructure and applications. New segments such as M2M services and mobile application stores are now included. Gartner, Inc. | G00216504 Page 3 of 16
  4. 4. Figure 1. Strategic Mapping of Market Opportunities, Worldwide (Billions of Dollars) IPTV and VOD, $31.5 IPTV Advertising, $1.2Internet Advertising, $151.1 Online Gaming, $21.4 Mobile TV, $5.6 Mobile Advertising, $20.6 Mobile Application Store, $47.1 Mobile Paymentand Remittance, $4.9 Public Cloud Computing, $112.9 Professional Services — Consulting, $95.4 Professional Services — Development and Integration, $282.2 Professional Services — IT Management, $280.9 Professional Services — Process Management, $161.7 Product Support —- Software Support, $83.0 Product Support — Hardware Maintenance/ Support, $100.8 M2M, $22.4Consumer Voice, $169.4 ConsumerFixed Broadband, $154.8 ConsumerInternet Access, $46.2 Online Music, $7.7 Mobile Voice, $645.7 SMS/MMSand Other Mobile Data, $551.5 Enterprise Voice, $119.3 Enterprise Data, $134.6 Enterprise Internet Services, $92.3 Mobile Games, $11.9 ConsumerLocation- Based Services, $3.8 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 EBIT(%) CAGR 2011-2015 (%) CAGR = compound annual growth rate, MMS = Multimedia Messaging Service, VOD = video on demand Notes: (a) "Internet Advertising" includes cloud computing-based advertising. (b) "IPTV and VOD" includes content (broadcast, video-on-demand and video interactive services) delivered via a telecom carrier-based managed Internet Protocol broadband network to a TV set using a set-top box. It excludes content delivered to a PC via the Internet. (c) The IPTV advertising represented here is the portion attributable to telecom carriers and not the total market revenue. It specifically excludes revenue captured by non-telecom carriers. (d) "Mobile Advertising" includes display ads (on mobile Internet and applications), searches (maps), audio or video ads received (not broadcast), and SMS/MMS/IM elements inserted into user-generated messages. However, it excludes SMS/MMS/IM-based ads that are pushed to users. (e) "Online Gaming" includes consumer subscriptions and purchases of game-related digital goods. (f) "Mobile Games" includes consumer application spending and micro-transactions only. (g) "Mobile Application Store" considers only revenue generated by applications, which include magazine subscriptions and e-books. It excludes any kind of "content," such as music, ring tones and wallpapers. (h) "Online Music" comprises subscription services, download services and personalization services (ring tones and ringback tones). (i) "Mobile Payment and Remittance" includes merchandise purchases, ticketing, money transfers and bill payments, but excludes top- ups for prepaid communication services. Transactions using the mobile telecom carriers' billing systems are excluded, as is mobile telebanking using interactive voice response (IVR) systems. (j) "Consumer Location-Based Services" includes user spending and transaction-based revenue, but excludes advertising revenue. Advertising-related revenue is included in "mobile advertising." (k) "SMS/MMS and Other Mobile Data" includes mobile data charges and mobile broadband subscriptions. (l) "Enterprise Internet Services" includes enterprise broadband access and Web hosting. Color code: Gray = traditional mobile services; green = traditional enterprise services; light blue = traditional consumer fixed-line services; Page 4 of 16 Gartner, Inc. | G00216504
  5. 5. dark blue = nontraditional services; light gray = IT and cloud computing services. Source: Gartner (September 2011) Market: Telecom Carriers Worldwide Are Increasingly Looking Beyond Traditional Telecom Telecom carriers' search for growth beyond traditional telecom services is driven primarily by market maturity/saturation and the rapidly changing market landscape that threatens to relegate carriers to the role of data transport/access service providers. How Has the Market Changed Between 2009 and 2011? Alliances between telecom carriers are increasing. Due to the growing challenge from nontraditional competitors, many telecom carriers have come to realize that they need to work closely together (for example, to operate joint application stores and collaborate on Near Field Communication and M2M). The formation of the Wholesale Applications Community by a group of telecom carriers in early 2010 was the result of the growing popularity of non-telecom carrier application stores, which posed a serious threat to the telecom carriers' own interests in applications, games and entertainment. In the area of mobile payments, telecom carriers in the U.S., the U.K., France, Italy, Denmark and Hungary have banded together in their respective markets to establish common platforms or standards. Cross-border collaboration is also happening — telecom carriers in South Korea and Japan are jointly involved in mobile payment solutions. Such alliances between telecom carriers may extend further to other nontraditional services. The rise of platforms and ecosystems. Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook are now competing globally, each trying to ensure the dominance of its platform/ecosystem. For example, Google's purchase of Motorola Mobility can be seen as an attempt to bolster the former's Android platform. Such players are increasingly on a collision course with telecom carriers as the latter venture into advertising, media and entertainment. Platforms are difficult to compete against once they are firmly established. This is due to the virtuous cycle whereby more platform users attract even more application and content developers. Apple has demonstrated to the world what is possible with its App Store. We can see that many telecom carriers are now also trying to establish their own ecosystems. Over-the-top (OTT) service providers and cloud computing are game changers. OTT service providers have become a serious threat to telecom carriers. They can leverage cloud computing to reach out to a broad audience (for example, Apple's iCloud service and Amazon's Cloud Drive and Cloud Player). Unlike telecom carriers, they are relatively asset-light (they don't own network access infrastructure) and are not constrained by telecom regulators. Their business models can be different too (for example, they can be advertising-funded and "freemium" models [a combination of free and premium services]). The likes of a Netflix, Hulu or Spotify can appear in major developed markets. Gartner, Inc. | G00216504 Page 5 of 16
  6. 6. Telecom carriers' pricing models are evolving. Cracks in the pricing models are beginning to appear, particularly for mobile broadband. Mobile data traffic is growing quickly, due to the rapid adoption of smartphones and media tablets. Flat-rate, unlimited data plans have not only become unsustainable, they have also allowed OTT service providers to flourish. Telecom carriers are now starting to move away from this pricing model. 2011 and Beyond — What Can Telecom Carriers Look Forward To? For the near to medium term, we expect the following major trends worldwide: ■ Media/entertainment, mobile payments, advertising, M2M services, public cloud computing and IT services will be the hot areas on which telecom carriers will focus. In many of these areas, we expect innovative business models to emerge. ■ Many nontraditional services launched by telecom carriers will be mostly through partnerships with third parties, and these will involve revenue-sharing agreements. Most telecom carriers do not have the knowledge and expertise to diversify on their own. ■ In many of the nontraditional service segments, there exist specific value chains and established players, and as telecom carriers enter these areas, there will inevitably be resistance from them. Disagreements over roles and business models can be expected. This may affect the pace of telecom carriers' entry into these new areas. Telecom carriers will also have to get used to more complex business relationships — one may compete and collaborate at the same time, depending on geography and/or service segment. ■ The context for communication will extend beyond traditional circuit-switched voice calls. Instant messaging applications (for example: WhatsApp Messenger and BlackBerry Messenger), voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) voice/video call features embedded into websites (Skype on Facebook, for example), portable wireless devices and applications will increasingly put traditional voice revenue (fixed and mobile) at risk. Microsoft's acquisition of Skype can further open up new vistas that will be disruptive to circuit-switched voice services. ■ The rise of powerful personal computing devices, social media, Internet-enabled television and the open Internet culture will exacerbate the loss of telecom carriers' control over their customers. Telecom carriers that fail to understand their markets and end users, and have yet to develop superior customer experience, will be particularly at risk. The new culture of "openness" will also require telecom carriers to adopt open ecosystems as opposed to "walled gardens." ■ Leading telecom carriers will be expected to focus on more personalization and targeted services. There will be attempts to leverage context to deliver value to end users. They will also need to leverage their assets when creating services/products (such as quality of service). ■ In the enterprise segment, there will be an increasing focus on vertical-specific solutions, to avoid price-based competition. This will require telecom carriers to develop a deeper understanding of key trends, drivers and concerns in other industries. Page 6 of 16 Gartner, Inc. | G00216504
  7. 7. Nontraditional Services — Challenges Confronting Telecom Carriers More and more telecom carriers have accepted the fact that they need to look into services beyond traditional telecom. To succeed in this, they will need to address some key challenges: ■ Lack of necessary knowledge and skill set. Telecom carriers need to enhance their understanding of the new market segments they are going into. Many still lack the prerequisite knowledge, know-how and capabilities. Partnerships or mergers and acquisitions can be considered. ■ Difficulty in creating value propositions and contributing meaningfully. Closely related to the previous point, telecom carriers need to identify their role and value propositions to acquire bargaining power in instances where revenue-sharing agreements are in place with third parties. It will be difficult for telecom carriers to demand a substantial share of revenue if they fail to contribute meaningfully in the value chain. ■ Presence of global competitors. In many of these new markets there are large established global players such as Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft. ■ Lack of global scale. Many telecom carriers operate within their own country markets and are therefore less attractive to content and application developers that are more predisposed toward partners with global reach and presence. To address these issues, telecom carriers need to look for talent beyond telecommunications. They need to forge alliances among themselves to create the necessary scale and operational efficiencies. They will also need to carve out their own distinct differentiators and value propositions, and avoid head-on competition with global giants. How Much Can Telecom Carriers Reasonably Capture? Based on the above assessment, we have estimated the percentage of new revenue that telecom carriers worldwide can reasonably capture in 2015, together with the EBIT margin (see Table 1). This is necessarily a qualitative/subjective assessment, based on our collective insights into telecom carriers' capabilities, the pace of their business transformation initiatives, and the strength of non- carrier incumbent players in the nontraditional service sectors. The inclusion of a line item "Nontraditional Services (Others)" takes into consideration communications service providers' revenue from services that we have not considered, or have excluded (for example, specific solutions targeted at industry verticals and managed home services, such as smart grid energy management, home networking and home security). The EBIT percentage used is the average of all the nontraditional services considered. Gartner, Inc. | G00216504 Page 7 of 16
  8. 8. Table 1. Telecom Carriers' Share of Nontraditional Service Revenue and EBIT, 2015 Telecom Carriers' Revenue Share, 2015 Telecom Carriers' Revenue, 2015 ($M) Telecom Carriers' EBIT, 2015 (%) Telecom Carriers' EBIT, 2015 ($M) Non-Traditional Services (Fixed-Line Consumer Segment) IPTV and VOD 100.0% 31,498 11.6% 3,666 IPTV Advertising 100.0% 1,193 19.3% 231 Internet Advertising 3.5% 5,288 17.9% 944 Online Music 20.0% 1,546 11.3% 174 Online Gaming 3.0% 641 10.4% 67 Non-Traditional Services (Mobile Segment) Mobile TV 90.0% 5,057 11.0% 558 Mobile Advertising 12.0% 2,473 22.0% 543 Mobile Games 10.0% 1,194 14.0% 167 Mobile Application Store 12.5% 5,887 14.0% 824 Mobile Payment and Remittance 30.0% 1,459 17.2% 252 Consumer Location- Based Services 70.6% 2,701 14.2% 384 M2M 33.0% 7,400 9.1% 675 Non-Traditional Services (Enterprise Segment) Public Cloud Computing 12.0% 13,552 3.8% 518 Professional Services — Consulting 2.0% 1,907 1.8% 35 Professional Services — Development and Integration 4.0% 11,289 8.0% 903 Page 8 of 16 Gartner, Inc. | G00216504
  9. 9. Professional Services — IT Management 9.0% 25,283 5.0% 1,264 Professional Services — Process Management 3.0% 4,850 12.0% 582 Product Support — Software Support 0.0% 0 4.0% 0 Product Support — Hardware Maintenance/ Support 8.5% 8,567 3.0% 257 Non-Traditional Services (Others) — 15,430 10.8% 1,673 Traditional Telecom Services Consumer Voice 82.5% 139,724 8.4% 11,669 Consumer Fixed Broadband 70.0% 108,361 20.7% 22,408 Consumer Internet Access 70.0% 32,334 21.2% 6,867 Mobile Voice 100.0% 645,687 15.4% 99,424 SMS/MMS and Other Mobile Data 100.0% 551,505 26.6% 146,894 Enterprise Voice 100.0% 119,330 16.8% 20,083 Enterprise Data 100.0% 134,647 14.8% 19,992 Enterprise Internet Services 100.0% 92,348 13.6% 12,547 EBIT = earnings before interest and taxes, M2M = machine to machine, MMS = Multimedia Messaging Service, VOD = video on demand Notes: (a) Telecom carrier revenue is defined as revenue collected/billed by telecom carriers, including the revenue-sharing component (in instances where partners are involved). This component is subtracted from the EBIT calculation. (b) The telecom carrier share for consumer voice is not 100%, because of voice over Internet Protocol from over-the-top service providers. (c) The telecom carrier share for consumer fixed broadband and Internet access is not 100%, because of market share attributable to non-telecom carrier service providers such as cable and satellite operators. (d) The relatively high profitability of mobile data services comes only with: (a) mobile broadband technology (Long Term Evolution and 3G+ or High-Speed Packet Access Evolution [HSPA+]); and (b) a volume cap, which should keep the average usage volume per month to an acceptable level and minimize abuse by heavy data users. Source: Gartner (September 2011) Gartner, Inc. | G00216504 Page 9 of 16
  10. 10. Figure 2 shows the revenue market shares for nontraditional services in 2015 (we provide an estimate of the average). The percentages may vary for telecom carriers, markets and countries. The sum of nontraditional services revenue attributable to telecom carriers is expected to amount to 8.1% of worldwide traditional telecom services revenue in 2015. Nontraditional services are expected to contribute most in terms of increasing top-line revenue, and include media/ entertainment, public cloud computing and IT services. From an EBIT perspective, nontraditional services will amount to 4.0% of worldwide traditional telecom services EBIT in 2015 (see Figure 3). Figure 2. Worldwide Telecom Carriers — Distribution of Service Revenue in 2015 2.0% 1.3% 3.3% 0.8% 7.1% 5.5% 1.6% 32.8% 28.0% 6.1% 6.8% 4.7% Non-traditional services (fixed-line consumer segment) Non-traditional services (mobile segment) Non-traditional services (enterprise segment) Non-traditional services (others) Consumer voice Consumer fixed broadband Consumer Internetaccess Mobile voice SMS/MMS and other mobile data Enterprise voice Enterprise data Enterprise Internetservices MMS = Multimedia Messaging Service Source: Gartner (September 2011) Page 10 of 16 Gartner, Inc. | G00216504
  11. 11. Figure 3. Worldwide Telecom Carriers - Distribution of EBIT in 2015 1.4% 1.0% 1.0% 0.5% 3.3% 6.3% 1.9% 28.1% 41.5% 5.7% 5.7% 3.5% Non-traditional services (fixed-line consumer segment) Non-traditional services (mobile segment) Non-traditional services (enterprise segment) Non-traditional services (others) Consumer voice Consumer fixed broadband Consumer Internetaccess Mobile voice SMS/MMS and other mobile data Enterprise voice Enterprise data Enterprise Internetservices EBIT = earnings before interest and taxes, MMS = Multimedia Messaging Service Source: Gartner (September 2011) Contrarian View: If Telecom Carriers Aggressively Redefine Their Business, These Trends Will Change The 8.1% revenue contribution figure given above represents a global average. Some telecom carriers may have stronger ambition than others. Such leading or innovative telecom carriers can be expected to grow their nontraditional services revenue to between 15% and 20% of their traditional telecom services revenue. This will depend largely on how telecom carriers redefine their core business and capabilities beyond voice communications and data transport/access. Telecom carriers' share of nontraditional revenue can go up if they diversify aggressively into adjacent markets via acquisitions or the purchase of large equity stakes (South Korean and Japanese telecom carriers have done this selectively in the past). They will also be required to focus on the following: ■ Developing capabilities in media and entertainment (including advertising). Telecom carriers can be more aggressive in pursuing and developing content — an example is Bell Canada's acquisition of Canada's largest media company, CTV. They can also further develop location-based functions and incorporate them into other service offerings, such as advertising. Gartner, Inc. | G00216504 Page 11 of 16
  12. 12. ■ Developing capabilities in IT services and public cloud computing. These two segments have the greatest potential to contribute to new revenue (from a market size perspective). ■ Pursuing "industry vertical" opportunities. Healthcare, education, smart cities and financial services (for example, mobile banking and insurance) are promising segments which can be developed further, some of them in tandem with M2M capabilities. Vendors to Watch Several telecom carriers have embarked on nontraditional service strategies: ■ Far EasTone Telecommunications. Saddled with a relatively small and mature domestic market, this telecom carrier has focused on nontraditional services, such as digital books, advertising, social media, digital music and application stores, to boost its revenue. It is focusing on local preferences and culture (through which it can avoid head-on competition with global competitors), and on pursuing opportunities in the cloud computing space. ■ Telefonica. This telecom carrier has set up a mobile banking joint venture with MasterCard, targeting consumers in Latin America. It has participated in social networking (Tuenti), IPTV, media and M2M services. It also has an investment arm seeking out new technology and service innovations. ■ France Telecom. This telecom carrier is aggressively pursuing nontraditional service opportunities. It has acquired Unanimis (which provides digital advertising), in addition to participating in mobile payment initiatives. It is also seeking to invest in Dailymotion for online video distribution. ■ Sprint. Even non-market leaders are pursuing nontraditional service opportunities to remain competitive. Sprint is participating in digital applications such as advertising and music (Sprint Music Plus, for example, in which it leverages its partnership with Rhapsody). It has forged an agreement with American Express to enable its smartphone users to use Serve, American Express' mobile payment service. Sprint was also the first telecom carrier to support Google Wallet, in early 2011. It is also establishing its M2M ecosystem. Conclusions This updated research reinforces the conclusion in our earlier report that there is no single compelling service or application that can serve as a "big enough" revenue generator for telecom carriers. As such, telecom carriers have to participate in numerous new activities. There will be a need to develop back-office systems and standardize processes as much as possible to reduce duplication of effort. At the same time, traditional telecom services cannot be ignored as they will still be major sources of revenue and EBIT in 2015. Telecom carriers must maximize free cash flow generated from these services, some of which can then be invested in nontraditional service initiatives. We recommend that telecom carriers focus on the following three areas: Page 12 of 16 Gartner, Inc. | G00216504
  13. 13. ■ Operational efficiency, to improve EBIT margins. Standardized processes and converged operations support system (OSS)/business support system (BSS) platforms come under this ambit. ■ Telecom carriers should also embrace a "fast moving consumer goods" mind-set. They must be quick to respond to changes in consumer preferences and market trends. From an enterprise market perspective, telecom carriers should develop a deeper knowledge of industry verticals. ■ Telecom carriers should adopt a venture capitalist mind-set when it comes to nontraditional services. They should be prepared to take risks, be more accepting of failures and develop expertise in innovation management. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following analysts for their invaluable input during the preparation of this report: Stephanie Baghdassarian, Sandy Shen, Fernando Elizalde and Annette Zimmermann. Appendix: Methodology The aim of this report is to position the new market segments and services open to telecom carriers. We have compared these segments according to three criteria: the revenue size in 2015, the CAGR from 2011 to 2015, and the EBIT. Market Segments We have identified the market segments that are most "hyped" and discussed among telecom carriers, network equipment providers, device manufacturers and market research analysts. We have attempted to be comprehensive, but there is a possibility that some attractive services have yet to be identified, or are excluded here. Revenue and Growth Rates Most revenue projections are based on Gartner's published market research. Where 2015 figures are unavailable — particularly for public cloud computing and consumer location-based services — we have extrapolated them. Such figures should be treated as preliminary estimates, and readers are advised to refer to final figures when they are available. We have estimated market segments for which no Gartner research is available, including revenue, EBIT and growth rates. Market segments in this category include mobile TV, mobile payment and remittance, M2M services, Internet advertising, IPTV advertising and online gaming. Profit Margin Our objective here is to provide an estimate of the margin on sales. Quite often, EBITDA margins are used to compare companies in the same industry — because corporate planners and decision makers want to measure cash margins. However, here we are comparing market segments with very different requirements in terms of capital expenditure — implying that one has to assign Gartner, Inc. | G00216504 Page 13 of 16
  14. 14. depreciation to each product category. So we have used EBIT margins (which are really operating margins) in this report. EBIT includes the contribution to sales, general expenditure and administration, and depreciation and amortization. Obtaining reliable data on EBIT for each market segment is very challenging. To estimate the EBIT, we have attempted to identify public companies working primarily in a particular market segment, or in a similar one. We have also looked at similar market segments and the level of investment and operational costs in each. Finally, we have examined the degree of competition that affects the likely price levels and margins. We have then combined all these estimates to derive a representative EBIT for the relevant market segment. Recommended Reading Some documents may not be available as part of your current Gartner subscription. "Forecast: Mobile Advertising, Worldwide, 2008-2015" "Forecast: Mobile Gaming, Worldwide, 2008-2015" "Forecast: Mobile Payments, Worldwide, 2008-2015" "Forecast: Public Cloud Services, Worldwide and Regions, Industry Sectors, 2009-2014" "Forecast: IPTV Subscriptions and Revenue, Worldwide, 2008-2015" (to be published) "Forecast: Consumer Location-Based Services, Worldwide, 2008-2014" "Forecast: Mobile Application Stores, Worldwide, 2008-2015" "Forecast: Online Music, Worldwide, 2008-2015" "Forecast: Enterprise Network Services, Worldwide, 2008-2015, 2Q11 Update" "Forecast: Consumer Fixed Voice, Internet and Broadband Services, Worldwide, 2008-2015, 2Q11 Update" "Forecast: Mobile Services, Worldwide, 2007-2015, 2Q11 Update" "Forecast: IT Services, 2008-2015, 2Q11 Update" "Market Insight: M2M Opportunities for Communications Service Providers; a Quantitative Assessment" "Dataquest Insight: Carriers Use Networking Services to Raise the Stakes in a Bid to Serve the Digital Home" "Market Trends: Worldwide, Top 10 Communications Service Provider Trends, 2011-2012" Page 14 of 16 Gartner, Inc. | G00216504
  15. 15. Evidence The quantitative aspects of this report are derived from research work already published by our colleagues. These are included in the Recommended Reading section above. The market trends described are obtained from press releases from telecom carriers and network equipment providers, and numerous dialogues with industry participants. Note 1 Telecom Carriers The term "telecom carrier" refers to legacy, network-infrastructure-based telecom service providers. It excludes cable companies, multi-service operators, satellite companies and independent Internet service providers. This document is published in the following Market Insights: Carrier Operations & Strategies Worldwide Consumer Services Worldwide Enterprise Network Services Worldwide Mobile Communications Worldwide Telecom and Internet Markets Asia/Pacific Gartner, Inc. | G00216504 Page 15 of 16
  16. 16. Regional Headquarters Corporate Headquarters 56 Top Gallant Road Stamford, CT 06902-7700 USA +1 203 964 0096 Japan Headquarters Gartner Japan Ltd. Aobadai Hills, 6F 7-7, Aobadai, 4-chome Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-0042 JAPAN +81 3 3481 3670 European Headquarters Tamesis The Glanty Egham Surrey, TW20 9AW UNITED KINGDOM +44 1784 431611 Latin America Headquarters Gartner do Brazil Av. das Nações Unidas, 12551 9° andar—World Trade Center 04578-903—São Paulo SP BRAZIL +55 11 3443 1509 Asia/Pacific Headquarters Gartner Australasia Pty. Ltd. Level 9, 141 Walker Street North Sydney New South Wales 2060 AUSTRALIA +61 2 9459 4600 © 2011 Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Gartner is a registered trademark of Gartner, Inc. or its affiliates. This publication may not be reproduced or distributed in any form without Gartner’s prior written permission. The information contained in this publication has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. Gartner disclaims all warranties as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of such information and shall have no liability for errors, omissions or inadequacies in such information. This publication consists of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice. Although Gartner research may include a discussion of related legal issues, Gartner does not provide legal advice or services and its research should not be construed or used as such. Gartner is a public company, and its shareholders may include firms and funds that have financial interests in entities covered in Gartner research. Gartner’s Board of Directors may include senior managers of these firms or funds. Gartner research is produced independently by its research organization without input or influence from these firms, funds or their managers. For further information on the independence and integrity of Gartner research, see “Guiding Principles on Independence and Objectivity” on its website, http://www.gartner.com/technology/about/ ombudsman/omb_guide2.jsp. Page 16 of 16 Gartner, Inc. | G00216504

×