Contribution of socio-technical systems theory concepts to a framework of Territorial Intelligence Philippe Dumas Laborato...
Thinking and dealing with complexity  <ul><li>General Systems Theory (Gst),  </li></ul><ul><li>from  </li></ul><ul><li>Wie...
The socio-technical systems approach <ul><li>The system as a representation </li></ul><ul><li>The role of the inquirer </l...
The system as a representation <ul><li>“ A group of units so combined as to form a whole and to operate in unison” (Webste...
The role of the inquirer <ul><li>“ Systems everywhere” Bertalanffy (1968) </li></ul><ul><li>Defining a system is a specifi...
Consequence for the Territorial Intelligence framework <ul><li>A territory is a system that can only be defined with respe...
A preliminary list of some relevant systems concepts <ul><li>Systems openness and bounded rationality </li></ul><ul><li>Le...
Systems openness and bounded rationality <ul><li>Open system vs closed system </li></ul><ul><li>Entropy </li></ul><ul><li>...
Learning and adaptability <ul><li>An adaptive system is in the class of complex systems that show self-direction in an evo...
Emerging properties <ul><li>New behaviors tend to create new functions, forms and significances  </li></ul><ul><li>Network...
Hypertely <ul><li>Adaptation based on hypertrophied development of existing functions </li></ul><ul><li>Borrowed from biol...
Decision-making <ul><li>Hypotheses of rational decision-making: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1) all possible alternatives are kno...
Four types of organizational assessment
Types of decision-making processes <ul><li>I: closed systems’ thinking relies on the hypothesis of efficiency maximization...
Conclusion <ul><li>The interest of that typology is that situations are shifting from one cell to another and this shiftin...
Thank you, Gracias, Merci Philippe Dumas [email_address] fr  , + 33 4 94 14 22 36
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Contribution Of Sociotechnical Systems Theory Concepts To A Framework Of Territorial Intelligence Philippe Dumas 1194273693608141 3

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Contribution Of Sociotechnical Systems Theory Concepts To A Framework Of Territorial Intelligence Philippe Dumas 1194273693608141 3

  1. 1. Contribution of socio-technical systems theory concepts to a framework of Territorial Intelligence Philippe Dumas Laboratory I3m, Université du Sud Toulon, France
  2. 2. Thinking and dealing with complexity <ul><li>General Systems Theory (Gst), </li></ul><ul><li>from </li></ul><ul><li>Wiener (1961), Von Bertalanffy (1968), Simon (1960) in the sixties </li></ul><ul><li>to </li></ul><ul><li>LeMoigne (1990) and Morin (1977, 1980) </li></ul>
  3. 3. The socio-technical systems approach <ul><li>The system as a representation </li></ul><ul><li>The role of the inquirer </li></ul><ul><li>Consequence for the Territorial Intelligence framework </li></ul>
  4. 4. The system as a representation <ul><li>“ A group of units so combined as to form a whole and to operate in unison” (Webster) </li></ul><ul><li>The manner in which “a given system is described depends upon the observer, his knowledge, and interest in the operation of the system, although for many systems there are some strata, i.e. features, which appear as natural or inherent” (Mesarovic et al., 1968, p33) </li></ul>
  5. 5. The role of the inquirer <ul><li>“ Systems everywhere” Bertalanffy (1968) </li></ul><ul><li>Defining a system is a specific choice of someone we name “inquirer”, i.e. someone who is interested in doing so. </li></ul><ul><li>Two characters: the observer and the designer </li></ul>
  6. 6. Consequence for the Territorial Intelligence framework <ul><li>A territory is a system that can only be defined with respect to the point of view of the inquirer, whether it is the observer or the designer. </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of boundaries </li></ul><ul><li>Properties of boundaries </li></ul>
  7. 7. A preliminary list of some relevant systems concepts <ul><li>Systems openness and bounded rationality </li></ul><ul><li>Learning and adaptability </li></ul><ul><li>Emerging properties </li></ul><ul><li>Hypertely </li></ul><ul><li>Decision-making </li></ul>
  8. 8. Systems openness and bounded rationality <ul><li>Open system vs closed system </li></ul><ul><li>Entropy </li></ul><ul><li>Bounded rationality </li></ul>
  9. 9. Learning and adaptability <ul><li>An adaptive system is in the class of complex systems that show self-direction in an evolutive environment </li></ul><ul><li>Example of adaptation to environmental change </li></ul><ul><li>Efficiency and effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>To learn is to increase one’s efficiency in the pursuit of a goal under unchanged conditions </li></ul>
  10. 10. Emerging properties <ul><li>New behaviors tend to create new functions, forms and significances </li></ul><ul><li>Networking </li></ul><ul><li>Social communities </li></ul><ul><li>Role of Information Technology </li></ul>
  11. 11. Hypertely <ul><li>Adaptation based on hypertrophied development of existing functions </li></ul><ul><li>Borrowed from biology (Simondon, 1989) </li></ul><ul><li>Negative </li></ul><ul><li>Positive </li></ul><ul><li>Participative democracy </li></ul>
  12. 12. Decision-making <ul><li>Hypotheses of rational decision-making: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1) all possible alternatives are known, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2) all outcomes are known, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3) preferences for every outcome can be ordered </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Organizational decision-making: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>compromises, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>trade-offs between conflicting rationalities so as to square with the balance of power </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Four types of organizational assessment
  14. 14. Types of decision-making processes <ul><li>I: closed systems’ thinking relies on the hypothesis of efficiency maximization of outcomes; it is the area where consensus is obtained because everyone thinks alike. </li></ul><ul><li>II: goals are shared, but the ways to attain them are controversial. </li></ul><ul><li>III: goals are not shared but the cause-effect relationship is fairly clear, so that negotiation can take place in power relationship. </li></ul><ul><li>IV: confused situations where all arguments are set forth and debated. It is also the situation where creativity will provide a way to return to cell I where consensus can be reached. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Conclusion <ul><li>The interest of that typology is that situations are shifting from one cell to another and this shifting game will explain the collective decision making process. </li></ul><ul><li>Micro decisions in Territorial Intelligence for Sustained Development can be interpreted with this model. </li></ul><ul><li>It is a way to improve participative democracy. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Thank you, Gracias, Merci Philippe Dumas [email_address] fr , + 33 4 94 14 22 36

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