Attitude <ul><li>Attitudes are likes and dislikes. This can be for objects, situation, persons, groups, or activities. Att...
Motivation There was a bar on the edge of town where local citizens celebrated on Saturday night. A shortcut through a gra...
11 Points to Ponder (Digest) <ul><li>1.) Ask others for advice. </li></ul><ul><li>Some mistakenly consider it demeaning to...
<ul><li>3.) Look for opportunities to praise people for their work. </li></ul><ul><li>Everybody can do something well. Obs...
<ul><li>6.) Provide opportunities for others to ventilate problems. </li></ul><ul><li>People like to be heard. Sometimes g...
<ul><li>9.) Give people responsibility up to the measure of their capabilities, but give them the authority to go along wi...
<ul><li>11.) Make others stakeholders in the policies. </li></ul><ul><li>To the degree that people contribute to a plan, t...
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Motivation Lecture

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Motivation Lecture

  1. 1. Attitude <ul><li>Attitudes are likes and dislikes. This can be for objects, situation, persons, groups, or activities. Attitudes influence our choices and work ethics. </li></ul><ul><li>However, there is no consistency between attitudes and behaviour. Often there are conflicting interests. Then attitude is a poor predictor. </li></ul><ul><li>Behaviour can change attitude - cognitive dissonance theory . </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging in a behaviour counter to ones attitude forces us to change the attitude. This is more so when there is no other consonant reason. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no consistency between attitudes. They are in “opinion molecules”. </li></ul><ul><li>Modelling. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Motivation There was a bar on the edge of town where local citizens celebrated on Saturday night. A shortcut through a graveyard made the walk home considerably shorter, so this was the weekly route for some. One night a man fell into an deep open grave which had just been dug. After struggling for some time, he realized he could not get out, so he just sat in a corner to wait for daylight and help. Another man fell into the same grave and was trying to get out when the first man got up and tapped him on the shoulder and said, &quot;Buddy, you can't get out of here.” BUT HE DID! That's motivation! Rarely can you make people do things, but you can create circumstances under which they want to, and even get satisfaction out of the fact that they did.
  3. 3. 11 Points to Ponder (Digest) <ul><li>1.) Ask others for advice. </li></ul><ul><li>Some mistakenly consider it demeaning to ask someone under them for advice. However, not only do some amazingly helpful ideas come out of doing this, but it also imparts a good feeling, and it gives that person a sense of truly being part of the activity, organization when opinions are valued. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Keep those around you informed. </li></ul><ul><li>People want to be aware. They are pleased when important information is shared with them. Also, it is surprising how, when participants know what the end goal is, they can make intermediate steps more efficient. It is frustrating and boring not to know the purpose of what they are doing. E.g.: “we need this x-ray to decide whether to operate.” </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>3.) Look for opportunities to praise people for their work. </li></ul><ul><li>Everybody can do something well. Observe what it is and praise that person for it. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Look for opportunities to commend people publicly. </li></ul><ul><li>Personal praise is good, but to commend a person in a staff meeting of peers or in front of a patients is even more gratifying to the recipient.  . </li></ul><ul><li>5.) Handle reprimands with care. </li></ul><ul><li>In almost all cases, they should be done privately. Call a person in and begin with mentioning something that the individual has done well. Then after a discussion of the offence, cite some similar experience of ours, or a mistake I have made before pressing the point. People should not always be mollycoddled. There are occasions when a good blasting is in order for carelessness, rank insubordination, or repeated failures. Anger, used to control people, is not worth the cost. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not look for someone to blame. Concentrate on solutions. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>6.) Provide opportunities for others to ventilate problems. </li></ul><ul><li>People like to be heard. Sometimes grievances or perceived grievances are without substance, or they are personality problems of the people themselves. It is up to the person to whom the problem is brought to, to distinguish the real from the unjustified. Such occasions are not to be taken as an opportunity for harsh lectures or discipline . . </li></ul><ul><li>7.) Admit when you are wrong. </li></ul><ul><li>It is amazing how many administrators, doctors, or supervisors feel that the admission of a mistake is somehow demeaning, or that it undermines authority when just the opposite is true. An individual who admits a mistake is usually admired. Confession indicates bigness , a confidence that a mistake can be made yet it is possible to pick up and move on. It clears the air. . </li></ul><ul><li>8.) Identify what others do well and help them build on their strengths. </li></ul><ul><li>Build on strengths, and support to overcome weaknesses. Obviously, no one person can excel in all of the activities. E.g. teaching. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>9.) Give people responsibility up to the measure of their capabilities, but give them the authority to go along with it. </li></ul><ul><li>It is wise to give employees and as much responsibility as they can handle, but without overdoing it. Most people like responsibility. Individuals like to perform and, of course, an organization benefits if they do. With regard to having authority accompany responsibility, this is a must. Do not expect results if you did not give authority. They will call back. </li></ul><ul><li>10.) Ask questions and things happen. </li></ul><ul><li>Not challenging or confrontational, just posed out of interest. It gives them a chance to tell of all the good things they are doing, which, in turn presents the opportunity to praise them for their performance. It makes one really pleased. They want to do other new activities. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>11.) Make others stakeholders in the policies. </li></ul><ul><li>To the degree that people contribute to a plan, they are committed to carry it out. As the expression goes, help them &quot;to buy into it&quot;. Staff should be encouraged to conceive ideas which can be put into practice, and not &quot;I just do what I am told.&quot; which was an expression so frequently used, and encouraged, in the past. These principles represent an attitude of mind on the part of authorities. </li></ul><ul><li>That is You !!! </li></ul>

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