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VLE Session 1| The Ripple Effect: Trauma-Informed Interventions with Abusers

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VLE Session 1| The Ripple Effect: Trauma-Informed Interventions with Abusers

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This 1.5 hour webinar will offer trauma-informed interventions when working with abusers. Presenters will explore the impact abusers have on family functioning, inclusive of undermining victim-caregivers and using children as weapons. Presenters will also discuss typologies of abusers and share assessment tools that can assist in determining appropriate treatment options.

This 1.5 hour webinar will offer trauma-informed interventions when working with abusers. Presenters will explore the impact abusers have on family functioning, inclusive of undermining victim-caregivers and using children as weapons. Presenters will also discuss typologies of abusers and share assessment tools that can assist in determining appropriate treatment options.

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VLE Session 1| The Ripple Effect: Trauma-Informed Interventions with Abusers

  1. 1. The Ripple Effect: Trauma-Informed Interventions with Abusers https://learn.extension.org/events/2169 This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Readiness Policy, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2010-48869-20685, 2012-48755-20306, and 2014-48770-22587. 1
  2. 2. Research and evidenced-based professional development through engaged online communities www.extension.org/militaryfamilies Sign up for webinar email notifications at www.extension.org/62831 2
  3. 3. Get Connected with Us https://www.facebook.com/MFLNfamilydevelopment https://twitter.com/MFLNFamDev Talk About it Tuesday: #MFLNchat https://www.youtube.com/user/MILFamLN https://www.linkedin.com/groups/Military-Families-Learning-Network-6617392 To subscribe to our MFLN Family Development newsletter send an email to MFLNfamilydevelopment@gmail.com Subject: Subscribe
  4. 4. Available resources https://learn.extension.org/events/2169 Find slides and additional resources under ‘event materials’ 4
  5. 5. https://www.linkedin.com/groups/Military-Families-Learning-Network-8409844 5
  6. 6. CE Credit Information • Webinar participants who want to receive 1.5 NASW CE Credits and/or 1.5 Georgia Marriage and Family Therapy CE Credits (or just want proof participation in the training) need to take the post-test provided at the end of the webinar. • CE Certificates of completion will be automatically emailed to participants upon completion of the evaluation & post-test.  Questions/concerns surrounding the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) CE credit certificates can be emailed to this address: MFLNfamilydevelopment@gmail.com  Sometimes state/professional licensure boards for fields other than social work recognize NASW CE credits, however, you would have to check with your state and/or professional boards if you need CE Credits for your field. • To learn more about obtaining CE Credits, please visit this website: http://blogs.extension.org/militaryfamiles/family-development/professionaldevelopment/nasw-ce- credits/
  7. 7. Today’s Presenters: Bob Smith, MS, LMFT, CCSOTS, AAMFT Approved Supervisor • Received his Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy from East Carolina University in 1997. • Has been an American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Approved Supervisor since 2001 accumulated over 15,000+ clinical hours working directly with families. • In 2008 Bob became clinically certified as a Sex Offender Treatment specialist (CCSOTS) and continued his efforts in providing treatment to juvenile sex offenders. • Bob joined Institute for Family Centered Services by assisting families who were about to lose custody of their children to the state in 1994. • Eventually a private practice developed and until recently his focus has been on furthering Family Centered Treatment®, an evidence based program that he co-developed. • Bob currently is responsible for assisting with changes in the development of Family Centered Treatment® and provides oversight for each of the state’s training programs and developed the FCT training into an on-line and competency-based program & Evidence Based Practice (EBP). • Bob was the project director of the Safe Start grant for IFCS which is funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), Office of Justice Programs and the U.S. Department of Justice. The goal of the Safe Start Program is to broaden the knowledge of and promote community investment in evidence-based strategies for reducing the impact of children's exposure to violence. 7
  8. 8. Today’s Presenters: Kacy Mixon, PhD, LMFT • Kacy is an Assistant Professor in the Marriage and Family Therapy Dept. at Valdosta State University where she teaches and provides clinical supervision to family therapists-in-training. • Kacy is also the Project Director/PI for the Family Development concentration of the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN). • As a licensed marriage and family therapist (AAMFT clinical fellow), Kacy has worked with families from all walks of life but specializes in families experiencing trauma, domestic violence, and foster care transitions. • Her trainings, presentations and courses focus primarily on family violence, trauma, military families, and foster-care transitions. • Her former grant work included the Safe Start Project, a joint research endeavor by RAND Corporation and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), which funded treatment programs aimed at reducing negative impacts of violence on children. • Kacy’s research endeavors currently focus on military families resilience, family violence and low- income family resilience factors connected to children’s success. 8
  9. 9. The Ripple Effect: Trauma-Informed Interventions with Abusers Lee “Bob” Smith, MS, LMFT, CCSOTS & Kacy Mixon, PhD, LMFT Flickr, Water Spire, by likeablerodent, 6.26.15, CC BY-SA2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/likeablerodent/5896226033 The following presentation is not endorsed by the Department of Defense and the information, as well as any opinions or views, contained herein are solely that of the presenter
  10. 10. Objectives Explore family violence as a pervasive societal problem Discuss reasoning for helping professionals to approach family violence work with a trauma-informed framework Look at domestic violence assessment strategies Explore research on working with abusers Discuss safe ways to infuse trauma-informed interventions in work with abusers 10
  11. 11. Why Study Family Violence? Screen shot taken from emergesupport.org http://emergesupport.org.au/viewpoint/family-violence-reports-on-rise Screen shot taken from HARV http://www.harvoutreach.org.uk/ Screen shot taken from Our Hometown.ca PHOTO CREDIT – Child.Alberta.ca http://www.ourhometown.ca/edmonton/news/NL0421.php Screen shot from national Coalition Against Domestic Violence http://www.ncadv.org/ 11
  12. 12. Let’s Be Prepared! Statistically, most people will interact with a family/individual experiencing family violence at some point in their life http://www.youtube.com/sinbysilencedoc#p/u/4/9IEKtI86K9 0 As a helping professionals, whether it is disclosed or not, you will be working with families who have experienced family violence in some form Screen Shot taken from bouncing back child abuse hotlines http://uhaweb.hartford.edu/ZYKIN/recognize.html 12
  13. 13. Domestic Violence (DV) Pattern of behavior in which one partner uses the establishment of control and fear in a relationship through the use of violence and/or other forms of abuse. Screen shot from domesticviolecestatistics.org http://domesticviolencestatistics.org/whats-worse-physical-scars-or-mental-scars/ 13
  14. 14. Domestic Violence (DV) (Continued) Domestic violence can differ in terms of the severity of abuse, however, gaining and maintaining control is the primary goal of batterers. Surrounding those that experience Domestic Violence is a culture of secrecy which perpetuates the cycle of violence through shame, fear, and societal stigma. 14
  15. 15. Define “Abuser” Perpetrator of the abuse (coercion, controlling, abusive behavior) Also known in DV literature as “batterer” Goals of working with abusers are to: Alter the patterned, conditioned, relational, interactions in the relationships between family members, so healing can occur Holding abuser accountable If this can occur, abuser has the most powerful to heal trauma that has occurred as a result of their perpetrated abuse Screen shot from Your Sanctuary for life without fear http://www.yoursanctuary.org.uk/about-us/learn-more 15
  16. 16. Tactics used by offenders to establish and maintain power and control over their partners can include: Making and carrying out threats Limiting victim’s interactions with family/friends Destroying property Name-calling Controlling all finances Pet Abuse Limiting victim’s interactions outside household/work Shifting responsibility for abusive behavior Using the children as weapons to maintain power over victim 16
  17. 17. Six Key Principles for Trauma- Informed Approach 1. Safety 2. Trustworthiness and Transparency 3. Peer Support 4. Collaboration and mutuality 5. Empowerment, Voice and Choice 6. Cultural, Historical, and Gender Issues http://store.samhsa.gov/product/SMA14-4884?from=carousel&position=4&date=09032014 17
  18. 18. Considerations for Trauma-informed Approach Consider the following: ◦ “Not what’s wrong, but what happened ◦ Symptoms are adaptations/ways of coping https://learn.extension.org/events/1734 18
  19. 19. Considerations for Trauma-informed Approach (Continued) Consider STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS… OPENNESS to experiences other than yours Know your ROLE and how you influence/shape the system you are embedded in Awareness of and Healthy Coping for STRESS 19
  20. 20. Considering Safety Safety has as just as much to do with a sense of comfort and predictability as it does for physical protection from harm. Another reason why victims stay: A quick, fleeing reaction to an event of physical violence can bring intense focus and pressure from the community, legal system, extended family, and other systems connected to families. The reaction of systems connected to the family can create more stress once the “secret” is out in the open ◦ military, legal, etc. Victims can often tolerate episodes of Domestic Violence if other known routines and familiarities in their life remain constant (e.g. overall functioning isn’t impaired). 20
  21. 21. Assessment Start with Risk Assessment Traditionally, this has involved the analysis of specific threats, or the batterer’s capacity for serious or lethal acts of violence. Helps us think through the dynamic elements of a particular case, and compare it to known cases that resulted in serious injury or death. 21
  22. 22. Assessment (Continued) Limitations of the Risk Assessment What they cannot do is predict the behavior of any given individual. The single best predictor of future violent behavior continues to be past violence, and no one can, in any absolute sense, predict lethality or serious injury. The other thing they cannot do is help us really enter into the world of victim's problem solving. ◦ Avoiding serious injury or death is certainly the most dramatic aspect of a domestic violence safety strategy. 22
  23. 23. Assessment (Continued) Assessing Patterns In identifying pressing concerns and evaluating risks, it is critical to get a sense of how the relationship has developed and the range of the patterned coercive tactics employed by the abuser. The question isn't simply ◦ "What kind of danger is the victim in?". We have to ask at the same time, ◦ "How constricted has the victim's life become?" ◦ "What might be done to reduce both the danger and the narrowing of free choice and action?" 23
  24. 24. When Evaluating threats, consider the following: Does the victim believe the threat? This is important information, even in those instances where you come to the independent conclusion that a victim is minimizing the danger she/he faces. Consider also that words or acts that are not particularly threatening in one cultural frame of reference could well be terrorizing in another. Was it made in the presence of other people? In writing? In a recorded telephone conversation? Willingness to "leave evidence" or "not caring who knows" may indicate a more serious intention to follow through. Is it detailed and specific? Evaluate threats in domestics as you would evaluate potential suicides: the more thought that's gone into the plan (evidenced by the amount and specificity of the detail); the more likely it is to be acted on: "I'm going to kill you" is cause for concern; "Tonight, I'm going to feed you feet first through that wood chipper" is cause for greater alarm. Is the threatened act consistent with the batterer’s past behavior? Explore when and how often these threatening patterns occur. Does the batterer have the means to carry it out? Again, consider the parallel to assessing potential suicides: There's having the thought, then there's having a plan, then there's being able to follow through. Where the "means" are at hand, there is more risk. Have there been "rehearsals" of the act that is being threatened? These can be verbal "picture painting" ("let me tell you what I'm going to do . . .") or partial reenactments (showing someone the weapon you intend to use or the place where you're going to kill or bury them). Does the threat extend to others (children, family members, police, new lover, Pets)? Fear of harm to others may restrict a victim's willingness to resist and/or to follow through with police, children's services, and the courts. Custodial interference and parental kidnapping are routine in domestic violence cases. In addition, a substantial percentage (in one study, more than a third) of domestic homicides is multiple-victim killings, murder-suicides, or murder-suicide attempts. Does the threat involve murder, suicide, or both? 24
  25. 25. DV Dynamics: Ripple effects on Family life Impact on family life ◦ Batterer parenting cannot be separated from DV behavior due to full pattern of conduct having implications for family functioning (Bancroft, et al., 2012) Impact on Parenting ◦ Undermining victim-caregiver ◦ Using children as weapons ◦ Impact of witnessing ◦ Relationship of each parent to each child Relationship between the family and outside world Flickr, Water Spire, by likeablerodent, 6.26.15, CC BY-SA2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/likeablerodent/5896226033 25
  26. 26. http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/168638.pdf Limitations of Traditional BIP’s Findings from Batterer Intervention Programs (BIP) research have been inconclusive, however, there have been some reductions in reoffending with those who participate in BIPs. There are many constraints faced by criminal justice agencies that refer and monitor batterers ◦ Although more information is being provided to the Criminal Justice system about better ways to improve BIP approaches, there is a need for judges, prosecutors and probation offices to better understand batterer intervention programs AND batterer-focused treatment options to make appropriate decisions regarding programming. ◦ Therefore, BIPs do not ensure that reoffending will not occur. Stith and McCullum research of co-joint and multi couple therapy http://www.drgehart.com/page3/page5/files/Stith%20DV%20couple%20tx.pdf 26
  27. 27. Alternative Batterer Interventions may involve: Detective contacts/DA’s Office “warm-off” letters “STOP-the-stalker” and other anti-stalking surveillance and apprehension measures Temporary Orders of Protection (Including ordered issues on behalf of non-victim witnesses Arrest and detention – for victim – directed criminal conduct) Batterers’ Intervention Programs (As conditions of release/probation/suspended sentence and not as an “alternative” to a criminal resolution of case. Independent criminal activity; possession or sale of illegal drugs; weapons charges; probation or parole violations Psychiatric evaluation and hospitalization/drug and/or alcoholism treatment (As conditions of release/conditions of probation) Bail and other conditions of pre-trial release Criminal convictions Permanent Orders of Protection Jail, Fines, and Restitution Including weekend and “part-time” jail sentences Suspended sentences Supervised probation Including intensive supervision and day reporting Electronic monitoring and “house arrest” Deportation Permit revocation/weapons confiscation Arrest and detention – for “other” criminal conduct 27
  28. 28. Research on Mental Health & DV Sayers, Farrow, Ross, & Oslin (2009) Depression and PTSD associated with difficulty reintegrating into family Veterans in study were referred for mental health Of veterans in study, 53.7% reported conflicts w/pushing, shoving, or shouting 27.6% reported spouse/partner afraid of them 28
  29. 29. Research on Mental Health & DV (Continued) Tinney & Gerlock (2014) Distinguishing between Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and violent behaviors associated with mental health issues Explored combat-related mental illness: post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), substance use disorder (SUD), suicide, and depression Distinguish between coercive violence and resistive violence Explore why violence is occurring & impact on the victim to determine appropriate treatment recommendations ◦ http://blogs.extension.org/militaryfamilies/2014/08/28/intimate-partner- violence-and-co-occurring-conditions/ 29
  30. 30. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms vs. Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Tactics PTSD Symptoms IPV Tactics Re-experiencing: Nightmare-related aggression; aggression during a dissociative flashback Physical/sexual assault: Occurs outside of nightmares and/or dissociative flashbacks Avoidance: Self-imposed social withdrawal; avoiding family/friends, and social activities Social Isolation: Cuts victim off form family/friends; isolates victim from support network Negative cognitions and mood: Negative beliefs about self and others; negative emotions (e.g. anger, inability to experience happiness and loving feelings) Emotional abuse: Suspicious and jealous of victims; accuses victim of unfounded actions (e.g. having an affair); alternatives between angry, threatening behavior and demonstrations of love Arousal: Irritable/angry outbursts (w/ little to no provocation); hyper-vigilance; reckless/self-destructive behavior Intimidation and threats: Threatens victim through displays of anger and aggression; exposes victim to reckless behaviors (e.g. reckless driving); uses tactics of stalking and surveillance of victim; justifies anger through righteous rage (e.g., “you owe me”) Adapted from: Tinnery, G., & Gerlock, A. A. (2014). Intimate partner violence, military personnel, veterans, and their families. Family Cour Review, 52(3), 400-416. doi: 10.1111/fcre.12100 30
  31. 31. Are ALL Batterers’ the same? 30 years of social science research has outlined various types of batterers inclusive of: Intimate Terrorism Violent Resistance Situational Couple Violence Mutual violent Control Batterers that fit the Intimate Terrorist description should not be considered candidates for interactions/treatment involving victimized family. 31
  32. 32. Intimate Terrorism (IT) IT Subtypes Violent Resistance Situational Couple Violence Mutual Violent Resistance The individual is violent and controlling. High levels of marital violence, broad patterns of coercive control. Impulsive and accepting of violence. The partner is not violent or controlling. In heterosexual relationships, this type is almost always perpetrated by men and those men tend to be hostile toward women and traditional in their attitudes toward gender roles. The more sever cases can result in homicide or murder/suicide. (1) “Pitbulls” (Dependent intimate terrorist): Emotional dependency, jealousy, obsession with partner. Not typically violent outside of the home. Physiological reactions indicative of powerful emotional turmoil and often display verbal lashing out toward partner; The emotional obsession with their partner tends to fuel their need to control. “Cobras” (Antisocial intimate terrorist): antisocial personality traits, violent in and out of the family. Physiological reactions include a tendency to put on a show of extreme emotion outwardly as they display aggression toward partners while remaining calm inwardly (heart rate, etc.). Control stems from a need to have their own way by any means necessary. It is the partner who is violent and controlling. The individual is violent, but not controlling. Typically involves women feeling trapped and reacting to their partner’s intimate terrorism. What follows is the individual using violence in retaliation as a coping mechanism to deal with the coercive control experienced. The more severe cases can result in incarceration and/or homicide as many of the women involved in the Sin By Silence (http://www.youtube.com/sinbysilencedoc#p/u/49IEKtI86K90 documentary share. (1) Although the individual is violent, neither partner is both violent and controlling yet specific conflicts tend to escalate. Violence is not a large part of the couple’s relationship but there are conflicts that turn violent. The violence ranges from minor to sever. For some couples the violence may never or rarely repeat. For others, It can be a chorionic problem. This type stems from the interpersonal dynamics of conflict management. (1) Both members of the couple resort to violence to gain and maintain control. Each person’s behavior is consistent with that of an intimate terrorist. This is different than a relationship that involves an intimate terrorism and violent resistance. It can be likened to mutual combat. (1) Types of Domestic Violence 32
  33. 33. Why involve Batterers? ◦ Some batterer-involved approaches look at the batterer has having the most power to heal any trauma caused by this patterned behaviors ◦ Holding the batterer accountable for their actions, ◦ Teaching how to establish healthy interactional patterns with victims and/or children, ◦ Fostering a healthy environment in which healing can take place through batterer’s genuine remorse and rehabilitation Screen shot from http://www.ncadv.org/ 33
  34. 34. Why involve Batterers? (Continued) The philosophy behind including the batterer in intervention solely rests on: Altering the patterned, conditioned, relational, interactions in the relationships between family members, so healing can occur Increasing the likelihood that future relationships will be based on more adaptive interactional patterns. The person who created the trauma has the most potential to heal it. Priority of the safety and welfare of family members is essential and is the guiding force for case planning and service delivery. We do not condone including batterers’ at the expense of victim and child safety. 34
  35. 35. Why involve Batterers? (Continued) Holding the batterer accountable and providing an opportunity for the batterer to contribute to the healing of the victims. By doing so the batterer needs to keep in mind two things: 1. That they are capable of the atrocities that they engaged in with out minimizing or denying and 2. That they did everything in their power to make amends and pay their restitution for the trauma they created. ◦ If a batterer just focuses on the 1st thought then they become disheartened and they’re is nothing to lose, so they deny and Batter again. If they focus on the 2nd thought they risk feeling like they are a better person now and deny what they are capable of and do not monitor high risk situations that lead to a relapse. ◦ Only by balancing these two thoughts will they have a chance at successfully negotiating healing and avoiding re-offense. 35
  36. 36. Why involve Batterers? (Continued) Various models of tx believe that the offender has the most power to heal any trauma caused by this patterned behaviors, ◦ can only be considered an option after strict scrutiny and supervision has taken place to deem participation beneficial to the victim(s). However, the reaction to the offender’s behavior by the family and its lasting impact beyond the offender’s involvement is what the focus of systemic treatment 36
  37. 37. Why differentiate between DV types? When no consideration is placed on the possibility that two different phenomenon are being researched– situational couple violence and intimate terrorism—results can provide a muddled picture of domestic violence. Johnson proposes that looking at domestic violence from a more holistic, typological framework sheds light onto what we know and don’t know–or need to continue researching. This is also crucial when looking at DV patterns among those suffering with PTSD/TBI Mental health issues with high prevalence in Military populations 37
  38. 38. Batterer Inclusion Assessment 38
  39. 39. The following is a preliminary list of the areas you will asses for to determine whether or not to involve the batterer in treatment: History of Violence/Use of Force Weapons Centrality Stalking Degree of Control /Coercion Other Concerns The batterer would need to demonstrate that you can hold them accountable in an attempt to honestly help them. Batterers will sense if you have contempt for them and close off. Therefore, this type of work is not for everyone, some therapist can not get past there own emotions of anger, hate, and disgust for what batterers' put victims and children through. Assessing Abuser/ Batterer Type 39
  40. 40. Trauma-focused Batterer Intervention Working Premises/Basic concepts for intervention Prioritizing the safety and welfare of family members is central and guiding force for case planning and service delivery. The following should always be considered in treatment: ◦ Adult victims need to be active participants in safety planning. ◦ Holding batterers accountable for their use of violence is essential to prevent further abuse. ◦ A coordinated community response by all service providers is essential to ensure effective intervention that will protect victims and stop perpetrators’ violence. 40
  41. 41. Trauma-focused Batterer Intervention (Continued) Working Premises/Basic concepts for Intervention The following should always be considered in treatment: ◦ Adult victims need to be active participants in safety planning. ◦ Holding perpetrators accountable for their use of violence is essential to prevent further abuse. ◦ A coordinated community response by all service providers is essential to ensure effective intervention that will protect victims and stop batterer violence. 41
  42. 42. Trauma-focused Batterer Intervention (Continued) After determining appropriate, working with batterers focuses on the following: Holding them accountable Being direct, matter of fact – (hold the truth out there, lay it on the table) If an abuser is not threatened in an exchange they then feel less need to control and coerce a situation. ◦ You’re building trust in them that their partner has their best interest in mind. Work on past traumas Allow some minimizing and build from the acknowledgment you do get: When the abuser says: “I did not hit her we were arguing and I talk with my hands, she went at me and my hand grazed her” The clinician reframes by saying: “Ok so when you hit her during that argument…..” This reframe and reversal is one way you can hold them accountable. 42
  43. 43. Trauma-focused Batterer Intervention (Continued) Have Batterer be able to articulate their process. Have a batterer plan for times when they might feel more threatened. ◦ Example: Provide hypotheticals of when they have been less sure of their process and/or more disconnected from their family. ◦ “What happens when…?” Have a plan to address all these including a safety plan for removal so the batterer is not present if they feel like they might lose control or have a need to control others. 43
  44. 44. Batterer’s are parents too… Sorting out co-parenting plans and custody arrangements ◦ Abusers seek custody more frequently than non-batterers (APA Task force) 44
  45. 45. A note about Self-care Hearing about traumatic experiences can have adverse effects on the wellbeing of those working in the mental health, advocacy, and related fields. ◦ Professionals providing services to military families often hear stories of loss, suffering, pain, hopelessness, difficulty transitioning, prolonged crisis, violence, traumatic death, etc. Developing strategies that promote wellness, or “a way of life oriented toward optimal health and well-being in which body, mind and spirit are integrated in a purposeful manner with a goal of living more fully” can help combat these negative effects. (Myers, Sweeney, & Witmer, 2000). (Puig, Baggs, Mixon, et al., 2012) 45
  46. 46. References Bancroft, L., Silverman, J.G., Ritchie, D. (2012). The batterer as parent 2: Addressing the impact of domestic violence on family dynamics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Davies, J. (June, 2008). When Battered Women Stay…Advocacy Beyond Leaving. National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV) Everson, R.B. & Figley, C.R. (Eds.). (2011). Families under fire: Systemic therapy with military families. New York, NY: Routledge. Jenkins, A. (1990). Invitations to responsibility: The therapeutic engagement of men who are violent and abusive. Adelaide, South Australia: Dulwich Centre Publications. Jenkins, A. (2009). Becoming ethical: A parallel, political journey with men who have abused. Dorset, England: Russell House Publishing. Johnson, M.P. (2008). A typology of domestic violence: Intimate terrorism, violence resistance, and situational couple violence. Lebanon, NH: Northeastern University Press. Johnson, S.M., Vhiffen, V.E. (Eds.). (2003). Attachment processes in couple and family therapy. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Myers, J.E., Sweeney, T.J. (1999). The five factor Wel (WEL-J). Greensboro, NC: Author. National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. (2005). Domestic violence facts. Retrieved February 7, 2009 from http://www.ncadv.org/files/DomesticViolenceFactSheet(National).pdf National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. (2005). Domestic Violence Facts. Retrieved February 7, 2009 from http://www.ncadv.org/files/DomesticViolenceFactSheet(National).pdf Puig, A., Baggs, A., Mixon, K., Park, Y.M., Kim, B.Y., Lee, S.M. (2012). Relationship between job burnout and personal wellness in mental health professionals. Journal of Employment Counseling, 49(3), 98-109. Safe Start Center. Healing the invisible wounds: Children’s exposure to violence. A guide for families. www.safestartcenter.org Smith, L.B., Mixon, K.A. (2013). Unit 10: Legal & Medical Perspectives. Family Centered Treatment: Domestic Violence Training. [Online curriculum]. Stith, S.M., Mcollum, E.E., Rosen, K.H. (2011). Couples therapy for domestic violence: Finding safe solutions. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Sokoloff, N.J., Pratt, C. (Eds.) (2008). Domestic violence at the margins: Readings on race, class, gender, and culture. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. Wallace, H., Roberson, C. (2011). Family violence: Legal, medical, and social perspectives. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. 46
  47. 47. Questions? Comments? 47
  48. 48. Lee “Bob” Smith, MS, LMFT, CCSOTS leebobsmith@aol.com Kacy Mixon, PhD, LMFT Email: kamixon@valdosta.edu Website|Twitter|LinkedIn flickr, Contact-Us, Paladin Zhang, 3.30.13, CC BY-SA 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/94270836@N04/8602295011 48
  49. 49. Key Take-Away Applications  Family violence is a pervasive societal problem  Helping professionals can approach family violence work with a trauma-informed framework which implements safety, trustworthiness and transparency, empowerment, voice and choice  There are safe ways to infuse trauma-informed care in work with the abusers
  50. 50. CE Credit Information • Webinar participants who want to receive 2.0 NASW CE Credits and/or 2.0 Georgia Marriage and Family Therapy CE Credits (or just want proof participation in the training) need to take this evaluation AND post-test: https://vte.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_1OmIitokAPMWvl3 • CE Certificates of completion will be automatically emailed to participants upon completion of the evaluation & post-test.  Questions/concerns surrounding the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) CE credit certificates can be emailed to this address: MFLNfamilydevelopment@gmail.com  Sometimes state/professional licensure boards for fields other than social work recognize NASW CE credits, however, you would have to check with your state and/or professional boards if you need CE Credits for your field. • To learn more about obtaining CE Credits, please visit this website: http://blogs.extension.org/militaryfamilies/family-development/professional- development/nasw-ce-credits/ 50
  51. 51. https://www.linkedin.com/groups/Military-Families-Learning-Network-8409844 51
  52. 52. October 15th @ 11am Eastern Session 2| From Coercion to Collaboration: Strength-Based Interventions for Military Couples Experiencing Domestic Violence https://learn.extension.org/events/2170 October 22nd @ 11am Eastern Session 3| Beyond Mandated Reporting: Building Resiliency with Families https://learn.extension.org/events/2171 October 29th @ 11am Eastern Session 4| What’s on the Web? Family Violence Resource Tool Kit https://learn.extension.org/events/2172 Upcoming Virtual Learning Event Sessions: 52
  53. 53. Find all upcoming and recorded webinars covering: Personal Finance Military Caregiving Family Development Family Transitions Network Literacy Nutrition & Wellness Community Capacity Building This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Readiness Policy, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2010-48869-20685, 2012-48755-20306, and 2014-48770-22587. www.extension.org/62581 53

Editor's Notes

  • Delete…just a place holder/reference point for each objective
  • Those who have experienced trauma need treatment approaches that take into account various Dr. Gillece described in detail the six key principles involved in a trauma-informed care approach in a previous webinar. In case you may have missed it or need a refresher, I’ve listed them here. We’ll now switch gears to look at practical ways you can implement some of these principles into your work with traumatized children. I’ll go into detail with implementing safety, trustworthiness and transparency, empowerment, voice and choice. And we can touch further on the others. Feel free to provide ideas that you have already implemented in your own work or plan on doing it in the future.
  • FAP service providers include:  
    Prevention and Education Specialists (BA or MSW's),
    New Parent Support Program (LCSW's and BSN nurses),
    Domestic Abuse Victim Advocates (BA or MA generally), and
    Clinical Treatment Providers (LCSW).  
    DoD funded Family Development concentration within the Military Families Learning Network to provide increased (and free) professional development opportunities
    https://blogs.extension.org/militaryfamilies/family-development/
    FB: MFLN FD |Twitter: @MFLNFD | LinkedIn: MFLN Family Development
  • What these tools do is help us think through the dynamic elements of a particular case, and compare it to known cases that resulted in serious injury or death.
    In a sense, they serve an important "supervisory" function, in that they remind us to do a thorough assessment and analysis of the significant elements of a case.
    These criteria need to be learned and able to be recalled, so that a therapist can utilize them in any given situation that they may encounter.
  • The best we can do is evaluate comparative risks, and attempt to safeguard against identified dangers.

    However, once we understand domestic violence as a problem of patterned, coercive control rather than simply as a problem of assault behavior, we are forced to broaden our concept of risk assessment.
    Like battered victims, we then need to conduct a thorough analysis of the complex package of physical, legal, economic, familial, social, and emotional risks faced by the victim, and by those she/he feel bound to protect.
    The Power and Control Wheel developed by Domestic Abuse intervention project, Duluth, MN, is a great way to conceptualize and present the extent of the coercion and control.

  • This requires a depth of understanding and persistence to get details about the victim’s situation.
    What was the last two incidents of violence like, starting 30 min prior to afterwards?
    How frequently have they been occurring? use 6 months to a year perspective.
    Look at the pattern, increasing, stable random, etc.
  • I added pets
  • Batterer as parent book pg 69
  • Differentiating between losing control, PTSD co-occurance, and PTSD (intimate terrorism or mutual violent resistance
  • According to the authors, “IPV occurs when there has been an act of physical or sexual violence in an intimate relationship and the range of offender behaviors continually remind victims that violence is always a possibility”
    Tactics might include: intimidation, coercion, threats or other forms of emotional abuse
  • Holding the batterer accountable and providing an opportunity for the batterer to contribute to the healing of the victims. By doing so the batterer needs to keep in mind two things: 1) that they are capable of the atrocities that they engaged in with out minimizing or denying and 2) that they did everything in their power to make amends and pay their restitution for the trauma they created. If a batterer just focuses on the 1st memory then they become disheartened and theyre is nothing to lose, so they deny and reoffend. If they focus on the second memory they risk feeling like they are a better person now and deny what they are capable of and do not monitor high risk situations that lead to a lapse and re-offense. Only by balancing these two memories will they have a chance at successfully negotiating healing and avoiding re-offense.
  • Needs work
  • Have them practice having a conversation and acknowledging their emotional state.
    Have them express when they are afraid or implications of certain statements and actions that scare them.
    A lot of encouragement and support is required to do this.
    If an abuser is not threatened in an exchange they then feel less need to control and coerce a situation.
    You’re building trust in them that their partner has their best interest in mind.
    Work on their past traumas
    Highlight Jenkins 2 books to drive home point about effective accountability holding strategies

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