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Innovative Pedagogies for ESD and GCED - UNESCO

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Innovative Pedagogies for ESD and GCED - UNESCO

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Presentation used in the debate “Innovative pedagogies for ESD and GCED: Is game-based learning the future?” organized by the UNSECO MGIEP during the UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development that took place in Ottawa, Canada.

Presentation used in the debate “Innovative pedagogies for ESD and GCED: Is game-based learning the future?” organized by the UNSECO MGIEP during the UNESCO Week for Peace and Sustainable Development that took place in Ottawa, Canada.

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Innovative Pedagogies for ESD and GCED - UNESCO

  1. 1. Innovative Pedagogies for ESD and GCED: Is Game-Based Learning the Future? Paul Darvasi @pauldarvasi Aleksander Isaksen Husøy @alhusoy Sandhya Nankani @litsafari / @litsafariapps Alexandr Iscenco, MEGA Co-founder
  2. 2. Eric Zimmerman
  3. 3. The rise of computers has paralleled the resurgence of games in our culture. This is no accident. Games like Chess, Go, and Parcheesi are much like digital computers, machines for creating and storing numerical states. In this sense, computers didn’t create games; games created computers. - Eric Zimmerman
  4. 4. When information is put at play, game-like experiences replace linear media. Media and culture in the Ludic Century is increasingly systemic, modular, customizable, and participatory. Games embody all of these characteristics in a very direct sense. Increasingly, the ways that people spend their leisure time and consume art, design, and entertainment will be games - or experiences very much like games. - Eric Zimmerman
  5. 5. Video Games as Art
  6. 6. Dr. Henry Jenkins
  7. 7. Games in Education Nordahl Grieg Upper Secondary @alhusoy spillpedagogene.wordpress.com CORE PRINCIPLES: - Games in and of themselves have no magical or miraculous properties - Treat games like any other learning medium - The teacher, not the game dev sets the educational agenda - Motivation/entertainment should never be the core justification - Learning outcome stems NOT primarily from interaction between student and game - Digital excursions - Allowing students to experience the life of others
  8. 8. Empathetic learning
  9. 9. GAMES THEN … The game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement. Several very valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are to be acquired or strengthened by it, so as to become habits, ready on all occasions . . . we learn by Chess the habit of not being discouraged by present bad appearances in the state of our affairs, the habit of hoping for a favourable change, and that of persevering in the search of resources. —Benjamin Franklin, “The Morals of Chess”
  10. 10. GAMES NOW … Source: Joan Ganz Cooney Center Sesame Workshop
  11. 11. GAMES FOR CHANGE Kids who play multi-player games online are more likely to have a positive attitude toward people from another country: 62 percent of online gamers hold a favorable view of people from different cultures compared to 50 percent of non-gamers. – Online Gaming and Youth Cultural Perceptions survey, Ireland, Killian Forde and Catherine Kenny
  12. 12. THE PRODUCER’S CHALLENGE “ “Imagine if we could build learning games that provided the same kinds of complex motor and cognitive demands as fast paced action games while featuring narrative content that was curricularly relevant. Games all feature stories laid atop interactive mechanics. One approach to learning games might be to build narratives that reinforce educational content while employing the same familiar game mechanics. Teachers could also have students imagine how existing commercial game narratives might be retold to be relevant to class content.” – Jordan Shapiro, MindShift Guide to Games and Learning
  13. 13. AT THE CORE IS STORYTELLING BIG BELLY BUSINESS, LIBERIA LOW-LITERACY WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING
  14. 14. BEHIND THE SCENES
  15. 15. OPPORTUNITY FOR ALL? “ Source: Joan Ganz Cooney Center, Sesame Workshop
  16. 16. CULTIVATING A GAME MINDSET Quest to Learn, NYC
  17. 17. A GAME MINDSET IN LOW TECH ENVIRONMENTS
  18. 18. WWW.JOINKIDMAP.ORG Kids Inclusive and Diverse Media Action Project
  19. 19. Resources on GBL • www.IKTipraksis.no (Guides/lesson plans to using non-ed games) • http://store.steampowered.com/curator/7389497-Extra-Credits-EDU/ • www.etc.cmu.edu/ - Carnegie Mellon • www.gamesforchange.org/play/ (games organized by ages and topics) • www.commonsensemedia.org/game-reviews (Curated learning games rated by educators) • https://killscreen.com/ (Quality game journalism) • http://www.polygon.com/ • http://www.teachapps.org - National Literacy Trust, UK • http://teacherswithapps.org - Reviews for and by teachers • http://www.childrenstech.org - Children’s Technology Review • http://megageneration.com - Example of game-based e-learning for ESD: MEGA Game • https://www.khanacademy.org - Example of gamification-based e-learning: Khan Academy • http://peace.americancouncils.md - Games on conflict resolution and peace building • https://www.coursera.org/certificate/gamification - Course on introduction into gamification • http://www.joinkidmap.org - forthcoming checklist for evaluating children’s media w/ratings

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