MEDEAnet Workshop ‘Multimedia Applications in School Education' on 3-4 April 2013 in Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria

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This workshop included practical exercises whereby teachers created their own video resources for use in a flipped classroom. Other presentations included inputs from teachers about specific IT related initiatives in the region. These were a project about the use of 3D with autistic children, an experience with an audience respose system and the experiences of a teacher on the use of software for web development.
Participants also learned how to re-use existing video materials in different pedagogical contexts, and explore the various different types of existing video resources which can be used for teaching and learning as well as view samples and best practices, many of which have been finalists or winners in the MEDEA Awards scheme 2008 – 2012.

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  • Working definition:
    Media wisdom is the totality of knowledge, skills and attitudes with which citizens can move consciously & critically in a complex, changing and mediatised world. It is the capacity for an active and creative media use focused on societal participation.
     
    It is not only about practical skills such as ict-skills, learning abilities and smooth handling of and creative use of different media, but also about media consciousness, insight in the mechanisms of commercial communication and the media industry, critical information- and strategic skills and responsible and safe use of media.
     
    When we talk about media, it is both the traditional media (television, radio, press), and the ‘new media’ (internet applications, sms) and the capacity for an everyday, informal and creative media use that is (implicitly or explicitly) aimed at participation in the cultural-societal sphere (readers letters, youtube, chatrooms, blogs, webcam, etc.).
  • December 2007: Launch of the MEDEA Awards

    The organisation of the MEDEA Awards consists of partners across Europe, who believe in the benefits and feel a certain need of the general integration of video and media in education and training.

    Our pedagogical vision is that “only when video and audio are routine components of education and online learning, that we will have an educational environment that reflects the media-rich world in which our learners now live.”

  • The name MEDEA is actually the acronym for “Moving images in EDucation European Awards”.
    It is an annual competition that is aimed at increasing the creative use of audio and video in education and as you can probably tell, with a very broad interpretation of the "Moving Images" part.

    We invite everyone to participate in the MEDEA Awards and this means that
    schools, universities, training providers but also students, teachers, audiovisual departments, for-profit organisations and companies
    can take part with animations, weblectures, documentaries, videoclips, games, Second Life applications, videoblogs, podcasts, videotutorials, ...

    In which we primarily are searching for creative and meaningful use of media. It has to have and give an added value to the learning taking place.
    Since January 2010 we also make the distinction between professional and non-professional producers and the best entry of each category will be awarded with a prize.
  • 1. Pedagogical quality: quality of didactics and of communication. Is there a clear learning objective? Is it likely that the material will result in good learning?
     In recognition of the importance of pedagogical quality, marks for this criterion have a double weight in the final score for each entry.
    2. Use of media: the choice and selection of the type of media, the advantages of the media selected. Is the type of media chosen used appropriately and in an exemplary fashion?
    3. Aesthetic quality: attractiveness of materials. Is the style and design consistent and appropriate for the target users? Is the entry appealing and pleasing to look at and to use?
    4. Usability: the intuitiveness of the material. Is it easy to use the application? Is there support, a set of guidelines, the possibility of feedback or help?
    5. Technical quality: are there possible flaws in the system and/or compatibility issues? Is it necessary to have unrealistic or advanced technical knowledge to be able to use the system, etc.
  • In 2008, the first year of the MEDEA Awards, we already received 121 entries from 25 countries of which the jury chose 2 award winners out of 6 finalists. One of these was Anti-Anti, a multimedial cluedo game created by students of the Sint-Lievenscollege Ghent in Belgium.
    This multimedia supported pervasive game was created by secondary school students of the Sint-Lievenscollege Gent (Belgium) to sensitise students for a national day against useless violence. Students participating in this 50 minute game had to search a fictitious murderer in their school through clues provided in mp3-files and video clips.

    In 2009 we received 254 online entries from 38 countries of which 8 finalists were invited to the Awards Ceremony where 4 award winners were announced. The overall winner was Know IT All for Primary Schools by Childnet International, which developed an animation and teacher guide on internet safety.
    Know IT All for Primary Schools includes a vibrant new 3D SMART animation created by Childnet International, designed especially for both primary school staff and primary pupils. The resources are designed to help school staff to understand important e-safety issues and to offer strategies and information on how to support young pupils to get the most out of the Internet. Childnet’s SMART rules are illustrated by this exciting and engaging animation.

  • In 2010 the competition attracted 140 entries from 31 countries, a very high number of entries despite the earlier closing date.
    BBC’s highly engaging project School Report which gives 11-14 year-old students in the UK the chance to make their own news reports for a real audience was a popular overall winner of this year’s MEDEA Awards
    BBC News School Report, started in 2006 by BBC News, gives 11-14 year-old students in the UK the chance to make their own news reports for a real audience. Using lesson plans and materials from the BBC News School Report website, and with support from BBC staff, teachers help students develop their journalistic skills to become School Reporters.

    In 2011 the competition attracted 115 entries from 28 countries. One of the finalists was INgeBEELD Media Wisdom Platform by CANON Cultural Unit (Belgium). This platform for media wisdom/media literacy, was created in 2011 by CANON Cultural Unit of the Flemish Ministry of Education and Training in Belgium. INgeBEELD’s aim is to educate children, youth and adults in media wisdom or media literacy, and it is divided into 4 different educational pathways with a specific target audience: 1) 3-8 year old children – an offline box, 2) 6-14 years youngsters – an offline box, 3) 12-18 years – online website and 4) an online platform for teachers in training and in practice, which is also open to anyone who wishes to learn more about the field of media literacy and media wisdom: media users, educators and parents, teachers, academics, artists, etc.
  • In 2010 the competition attracted 140 entries from 31 countries, a very high number of entries despite the earlier closing date.
    BBC’s highly engaging project School Report which gives 11-14 year-old students in the UK the chance to make their own news reports for a real audience was a popular overall winner of this year’s MEDEA Awards
    BBC News School Report, started in 2006 by BBC News, gives 11-14 year-old students in the UK the chance to make their own news reports for a real audience. Using lesson plans and materials from the BBC News School Report website, and with support from BBC staff, teachers help students develop their journalistic skills to become School Reporters.

    In 2011 the competition attracted 115 entries from 28 countries. One of the finalists was INgeBEELD Media Wisdom Platform by CANON Cultural Unit (Belgium). This platform for media wisdom/media literacy, was created in 2011 by CANON Cultural Unit of the Flemish Ministry of Education and Training in Belgium. INgeBEELD’s aim is to educate children, youth and adults in media wisdom or media literacy, and it is divided into 4 different educational pathways with a specific target audience: 1) 3-8 year old children – an offline box, 2) 6-14 years youngsters – an offline box, 3) 12-18 years – online website and 4) an online platform for teachers in training and in practice, which is also open to anyone who wishes to learn more about the field of media literacy and media wisdom: media users, educators and parents, teachers, academics, artists, etc.
  • MEDEAnet project online soon at the url www.medeanet.eu
  • summarize facts and ideas and retell information and events
  •  students demonstrate methods or procedures, carry out procedures, experiment with concepts in a new setting, use ideas or knowledge, and discover a new purpose
  •  discriminate fact from hypothesis, recognize intent, and deconstruct content, as well as helping them observe structure, organize content, and select important elements
  •  students check for accuracy, detect inconsistencies, appraise efficiency, judge techniques, critique solutions, and evaluate procedures
  • users construct designs, generate possibilities, compose ideas, brainstorm solutions, design products, assemble plans, and propose hypotheses
  • When we first started making videos, they lasted the same length of time as our typical lectures. Most of our lectures contained multiple objectives. This is fine in a live setting, but in a video setting we have found that we need to stick to one topic per video. We try to keep our videos under 15 minutes and really shoot for under 10 minutes.
  • In order for any learning to take place, you must first capture the attention of the student. A multimedia program that begins with an animated title screen sequence accompanied by sound effects or music startles the senses with auditory or visual stimuli. An even better way to capture students' attention is to start each lesson with a thought-provoking question or interesting fact. Curiosity motivates students to learn.
  • Early in each lesson students should encounter a list of learning objectives. This initiates the internal process of expectancy and helps motivate the learner to complete the lesson. These objectives should form the basis for assessment and possible certification as well. Typically, learning objectives are presented in the form of "Upon completing this lesson you will be able to. . . ." The phrasing of the objectives themselves will be covered under Robert Mager's contributions later in this chapter.
  • Associating new information with prior knowledge can facilitate the learning process. It is easier for learners to encode and store information in long-term memory when there are links to personal experience and knowledge. A simple way to stimulate recall is to ask questions about previous experiences, an understanding of previous concepts, or a body of content.
  • This event of instruction is where the new content is actually presented to the learner. Content should be chunked and organized meaningfully, and typically is explained and then demonstrated. To appeal to different learning modalities, a variety of media should be used if possible, including text, graphics, audio narration, and video.
  • Provide "learning guidance"
    To help learners encode information for long-term storage, additional guidance should be provided along with the presentation of new content. Guidance strategies include the use of examples, non-examples, case studies, graphical representations, mnemonics, and analogies.
    Elicit performance (practice)
    In this event of instruction, the learner is required to practice the new skill or behavior. Eliciting performance provides an opportunity for learners to confirm their correct understanding, and the repetition further increases the likelihood of retention.
    Provide feedback
    As learners practice new behavior it is important to provide specific and immediate feedback of their performance. Unlike questions in a post-test, exercises within tutorials should be used for comprehension and encoding purposes, not for formal scoring. Additional guidance and answers provided at this stage are called formative feedback.
    Assess performance
    Upon completing instructional modules, students should be given the opportunity to take (or be required to take) a post-test or final assessment. This assessment should be completed without the ability to receive additional coaching, feedback, or hints. Mastery of material, or certification, is typically granted after achieving a certain score or percent correct. A commonly accepted level of mastery is 80% to 90% correct.
    Enhance retention and transfer to the job
  • MEDEAnet Workshop ‘Multimedia Applications in School Education' on 3-4 April 2013 in Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria

    1. 1. MEDEAnet workshop ‘Multimedia Applications in School Education' 3-4 April 2013 in Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria ITPIO in association with the Regional Inspectorate of Education in Blagoevgrad
    2. 2. ATiT • Belgian company set up in 1999 • Primary interest in the best use of technology to support learning • Particular media interest in media • Over 500 different activities, projects or jobs of varying size
    3. 3. Training Consultancy Production Management ATiT www.atit.be
    4. 4. Training Use of technology to support learning Kenya: Producing and publishing media for online learning Iraq: Social media - journalists & public relations staff Educational video production courses Week long courses in 2011, 2012 and 2013 Courses in 2013 • Creating your own apps for teaching and learning • Use of social media for Lifelong Learning Project managers www.atit.be
    5. 5. Production Portal services to support network development and maintenance Voices against Corruption School Leadership portal Interactive devices for cultural and educational events Sportimonium Pigeon Video relay services in the medical field www.atit.be
    6. 6. Consultancy World Bank Global Distance Learning Network National governments and agencies Philippines Indonesia European Commission Framework R&D Lifelong Learning Programme www.atit.be
    7. 7. Management Event management Special events – e.g. kaleidoscope dissemination event Large conferences – Online Educa Berlin and eLearning Africa Media & Learning Conference European projects in the role of supporting: Dissemination, Pilot and/or Evaluation REC:all VISCED and ReViCa Web2LLP SAILS www.atit.be
    8. 8. Moving images in EDucation European Awards • Annual awards since 2008 • With animations, weblectures, documentaries, videoclips, games, ... • Free to enter – any production made in past 3 years • French, German, English, Italian, Spanish or Polish • Over 700 entries since 2008 • Visit website and media gallery
    9. 9. MEDEA Awards related activities Media & Learning monthly Newsletter Media & Learning Community of Practice Media & Learning annual conference in Brussels Media & Learning Resources database MEDEA2020 2011-2012 project MEDEA:EU 2008-2011 project 2 day workshops Week long training courses MEDEAnet 2012-2014 project Webinar series
    10. 10. MEDEA Association • International not-for-profit association to enhance innovation and creativity in teaching and learning across all levels of education and training in Europe • Board of 6 founding partners • CSP (President Eleonora Pantó) • ATiT (Secretary Mathy Vanbuel) • Aunege Association of French Universities (Treasurer Gerard Casanova) • IADT – Bernard Mullarkey • EITF – Ene Koitla • KU Leuven – Wim Van Petegem
    11. 11. MEDEA Association • Membership recruitment drive for organisational members starting Spring 2013 • Membership benefits: • Facilitation service – finding appropriate partners , and provision of advice on project set-up and management • Training and workshop service • Access to database of MEDEA entries • Annual conference benefits • Dissemination services, newsletter, webinar service, online community support
    12. 12. The MEDEAnet project and the MEDEA Awards
    13. 13. The MEDEAnet project 3-year (Jan 2012 – Dec 2014) network project funded under KA3 of the Lifelong Learning Programme Aiming to: • Exploit best practices of the MEDEA Awards • Extend its existing informal network • Support the MEDEA Association
    14. 14. MEDEAnet activities MEDEAnet promoting media-based learning to organisations and practitioners a 12-part series of public webinars knowledge building and sharing amongst practitioners workshops in 7 partner countries a large-scale dissemination and exploitation strategy Annual report Charting Media and Learning in Europe
    15. 15. Moving images in EDucation European Awards www.medea-awards.com • Awards’ background • Previous awards winners • Judging Criteria • Activities related to the awards • MEDEAnet project
    16. 16. Only when video and audio are routine components of education and online learning, that we will have an educational environment that reflects the media-rich world in which our learners now live. Organisation and vision • Partners in Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Poland, Romania, Spain, ... ” “
    17. 17. Who can participate & How? • Students, teachers, audiovisual departments, schools, training centres, professional producers,... from all educational levels • Animations, weblectures, documentaries, videoclips, games, ... • Free to enter • French, German, Polish, English, Italian or Spanish
    18. 18. Special PrizeSpecial PrizeSpecial PrizeMEDEA AwardMEDEA Award Finalists • Finalists take part in Media & Learning Conference and awards ceremony in Brussels • Prizes include awards, software or hardware • Interviews and published extracts of finalists in the online media gallery User-Generated Educational Media Professionally Produced Educational Media European Collaboration in the creation of Educational Media Educational Media Encouraging EU Citizenship MEDEA Jury Special Prize
    19. 19. Judging Criteria • Pedagogical quality • Media use and integration • Aesthetic quality • Usability • Technical quality • New jury members are always welcome!
    20. 20. First 2 years • 2008: 121 online entries from 25 countries • 2009: 254 online entries from 38 countries “Anti-Anti” Sint-Lievenscollege Ghent (Belgium) MEDEA Special Jury Award 2008 “Know IT All for Primary Schools” Childnet International (United Kingdom) Overall Award 2009
    21. 21. 2010 & 2011 • 2010: 140 online entries from 31 countries • 2011: 115 online entries from 28 countries “BBC News School Report” BBC (United Kingdom) Overall Award 2010 “INgeBEELD Media Wisdom Platform” CANON Cultural Unit (Belgium) Finalist 2011
    22. 22. 2012 213 online entries from 32 countries Quand la colère fait tomber les masques Université Paris 1 (France) Overall Award for professionally produced entry And the Oscar goes to…… 5th Primary School of Alexandroupolis (Greece) Overall Award for user-generated entry
    23. 23. Showcases and examples European Chain reaction – special award 2011 Weapons of Mass Destruction – finalist 2011 Planet SciCast – finalist 2009 Daisy and Drago – winner 2009 The Classroom – finalist 2010 Five Little Ducks – Highly Commended 2008 Changing lives – special awards 2011 Monkey Labs Games – winner 2011 Green schools War on Waste Highly Commended 2010
    24. 24. http://www.medea-awards.com/media-gallery/showcases
    25. 25. Participate in the MEDEA Awards 2013! Deadline 30 September 2013 More information on www.medea-awards.com or contact secretariat@medea-awards.com
    26. 26. Links • MEDEA Awards: http://www.medea-awards.com • Media & Learning Conference: http://www.media-and-learning.eu • Media & Learning Community & Resources database: http://www.media-and-learning.eu/community • Media & Learning News: http://news.media-and-learning.eu • MEDEAnet project: http://www.medeanet.eu
    27. 27. Why Video for Education? • Video surpasses the written word • Seeing and hearing is better than reading or hearing and reading • Video stimulates emotionally • Information is conveyed more successfully by demonstrating • Video is a compact, concise media • Video is attractive (for GenerationX, Y, Z…)
    28. 28. Video Production Let’s make a complex process simple 1. A familiar, engaging and learnful subject 2. Prepare an outline or “script” 3. Carry out research, collect the essential information 4. Record the material (images, screens, sound, graphics…) 5. Edit the video 6. Publish the video
    29. 29. What do you need? • Subject • Time • to prepare • to record • Location
    30. 30. Subject Two main types • An event organised by others or somewhat out of your control over time and location • football game, theatre play, live lesson • a touristic video • a vox populi • An event under your control • demonstration, fiction, presentation, animation, interviews
    31. 31. Good preparation • Scenario (storyboard) or planning • Location scouting • Find/meet actors or experts, accessories ... • Rehearse and practise
    32. 32. Scenario/storyboard • See the film in your mind (role of video and of audio) • Put the film on paper • script, scenario, storyboard... • Why is it important? • Foresee: (4C) • control during the recording (and editing!) • content • continuity • cost • Execute the recording (but don’t forget to prepare it!)
    33. 33. What do you need? • Camera: • DV (or best affordable) www.whatcamera.com / Video magazine • web cam? • Screen cam • Photocamera… • Tripod for video recording: safety first Possibly also • Additional microphone, headphones • Additional batteries • Lights
    34. 34. Good images • Enough light and good light • no dark, grainy images • Use tripod • jerky images make seasick and cost bandwidth • Choose camera position and angle carefully
    35. 35. Free Screen Recording Software • http://www.techsmith.com/jing.html capture your screen for videos, add text boxes, arrows or rectangles to highlight spots, record audio together with the video • http://camstudio.org/ open source screen recorder software records all screen and audio activity on computer, creates AVI or SWF • http://www.advancity.net/eng/products/capturefox.html Firefox add-on records screen frame by frame with voice and provides AVI output • http://www.utipu.com/ screen recording with audio and video, AVI and FLV output, audio can be re- recorded, trim beginning and end, zoom video to mouse cursor with smart zooming and ability to draw free-style during recording • http://www.debugmode.com/wink/ tutorial and presentation creation software, capture screenshots, add explanation boxes, buttons and title, records voice, creates highly compressed Flash movies
    36. 36. Video Editing Tips 1 • Always shoot with the editing in mind: • take different shots, close shots, wide shots, hold the camera steady, film enough footage, you can always cut out later what you don’t need. • Work organized: • if you are making a longer movie, prepare a storyboard up first. Name your clips in your video editing software. Use the same names as you use in your storyboard. If you don’t name your clips you will end up with a heap of files and you will lose a lot of time trying to find the footage that you are looking for. • First assemble: • Once you have your footage loaded into the editing software, start with creating a “rough cut”: put the main footage you want to use in chronological order in the time line.
    37. 37. Video Editing Tips 2 • Cut out the crap: • trim the beginning and endings of each clip and cut out all the unusable shots • Tell your story: • where can you add close ups? What shots can you add to enhance the effect? Try out different things and notice the impact, effect or feeling, the emotion that the video brings across • Take it easy: • Your shots last at least between 2 and 10 seconds. Vary shot lengths, some longer shots and then some shorter ones. Don’t go for the stroboscope effect, MTV or boredom. In about 5 seconds, the human brain has seen most details of a picture
    38. 38. Video Editing Tips 3 • Add some effects: • bring your audience into the movie, prettify your movie. Careful: try to “feel” what different effects do to your movie, don’t go crazy with flipping and twirling stuff, read the language of movies • Create intro, opening and closing titles: • have a proper beginning and ending, black at the end of a movie creates a dramatic effect. When a title follows black, the audience can relax. • Add music and sound effects: • test different kind of music tracks for your video and “feel” the difference. A good choice of music will enhance your video
    39. 39. First steps of a « story » • What do you want to tell? What is its purpose? • Define the learning outcome/objective • Start research and documentation • Get a lot of ideas & inspiration! • Start distilling the information • Make a first outline • Evaluate • Produce detailled script
    40. 40. • The place of video for learning in the learning context, integrating video in the learning process • Not all learning can always be done entirely in every video…
    41. 41. Remembering Actions: • recognizing, • listing, • describing, • identifying, • retrieving, • naming, • locating, • finding
    42. 42. Understanding Actions: • interpreting, • summarizing, • inferring, • paraphrasing, • classifying, • comparing, • explaining, • exemplifying
    43. 43. Applying Actions: • implementing, • carrying out, • using, • executing
    44. 44. Analyzing Actions: • comparing, • organizing, • deconstructing, • attributing, • outlining, • finding, • structuring, • integrating
    45. 45. Evaluating Actions: • checking, • hypothesizing, • critiquing, • experimenting, • judging, • testing, • detecting, • monitoring
    46. 46. Creating Actions: • designing, • constructing, • planning, • producing, • inventing, • devising, • making
    47. 47. Bloom’s Taxonomy
    48. 48. Ideas… • Biographical and Autobiographical videos e.g. Animoto • Common craft video (hand drawn, cut out) • Stop-motion videos (Jellycam) • Documentary • Flipped classroom (Khan style)
    49. 49. Flipping The Classroom • Flipped learning: students watch instructional videos for homework and use class time to practice what they’ve learned. • Presentation software (e.g., PowerPoint, Prezi, Keynote, Smart Notebook) • You can make high-quality educational videos for your students. Here are a few Video Rules.
    50. 50. 1. Keep it short • YouTube generation • Bite-sized pieces: just the quadratic formula, not anything else. One topic equals one video. • 3 minute rule?
    51. 51. 2. Animate your voice • Engage your students, use your voice to make videos exciting
    52. 52. 3. Create the video with another teacher • Powerful conversation instead of watching a talking head • Dialogue is helpful in comprehension of the material • Like radio show
    53. 53. 4. Add humor • Put a running joke in (but only for the first minute or so) • Humor brings interest to the video, which keeps the students interested
    54. 54. 5. Don’t waste your students’ time • Students are watching this in their own time. Keep to your topic.
    55. 55. 6. Add annotations • Think of your screen as a whiteboard: use annotation to add pen markups or similar
    56. 56. 7. Add callouts • A callout is a text box, a shape, or some other object that will appear for a while in the video and then disappear. • Bring attention to the key elements in a video • Show steps in a problem
    57. 57. 8. Guide the eye of the viewer • Zoom in to different portions of the screen: zoom in to the portion of the picture that is most important for comprehension, help the students focus
    58. 58. 9. Keep it copyright friendly • Video will likely be posted online, make sure that you follow appropriate copyright laws
    59. 59. Elaboration • Who, (protagonist, antagonist) • What, (plot) • When, • Where, (setting) • Why, • How
    60. 60. Simple Guidelines to Instruction 1. Gain attention Stimuli activate receptors
    61. 61. Simple Guidelines to Instruction 2. Inform learners of objectives Create level of expectation for learning
    62. 62. Simple Guidelines to Instruction 3. Stimulate recall of prior learning Retrieval and activation of short-term memory situation
    63. 63. Simple Guidelines to Instruction 4. Present the new content Selective perception of content
    64. 64. Simple Guidelines to Instruction 5. Provide "learning guidance" Induce storage in long-term memory 6. Practice Perform acquired knowledge 7. Provide feedback & Assess performance Retrieval and reinforcement of content as final evaluation 8. Enhance retention and transfer to next level Retrieval and generalisation of learned skill to new situation
    65. 65. Action!
    66. 66. Assessing the video project: post- production. • Did video demonstrate what you said it would in outline and script? • Did the audience (classmates) learn something from the final product? Did they learn what you wanted them to learn? • Was the final product engaging? • How does the audience evaluate the product? • Was it worth the trouble?

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