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Emergency procedure at height

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Emergency procedure at height

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Emergency procedure at height

  1. 1. 1 Emergency Procedure at Height LOGO
  2. 2. Planning for emergency rescue Jason WOODS IPAF Middle East Country Representative
  3. 3.  Not for profit organisation  Current number of members – worldwide - 1055  Number of countries where IPAF have members – 55  Number of Country Councils 9  Number of training centres worldwide – 573  Average number of operators trained per month – 11,700  Number of operators trained to date in 2015 – 130,657  Number operators with a valid card 620,000  Representatives on major design, safe use and training standards  Provide support, campaign material, guidance, information  Research and development projects PROMOTE THE SAFE AND EFFECTIVE USE OF MEWPs WORLDWIDE IPAF Facts www.ipaf.org
  4. 4. Planning for emergency rescue Legal requirement to plan for emergency and rescue when anyone is working at height The speed and ease of rescue can make a very significant difference if any injuries sustained. Safe rescue capability is designed and built in to all MEWPs:  Auxiliary controls in the platform  Additional set of controls at ground level Approx. 40,000 MEWPs in UK
  5. 5. MEWP control design varies 6
  6. 6. Stages of emergency rescue planning  Identify what could reasonably go wrong and how it can effect those at height……… Risk Assessment  Implement suitable measures to eliminate or reduce the possibility of anything going wrong….Prevention measures  Suitable means of lowering persons safely to the ground if prevention measures fail … A Plan  Making sure everyone involved knows what to do ….Communicate and practice
  7. 7. Risk assessment  Familiarity of control functions  Machine failure or malfunction  External influence – materials - traffic  Operator incapacitated  No-one on ground to assist  No-one familiar with the ground controls  No key in the ground controls  Unsafe work practices
  8. 8. How well do you know:  Regulations and standards affecting MEWP usage?  Safe operating methods and hazard awareness? (PAL+)  Safety beyond training?
  9. 9.  Familiarity of control functions  Machine failure or malfunction  External influence – materials - traffic  Operator incapacitated  No-one on ground to assist  No-one familiar with the ground controls  No key in the ground controls  Unsafe work practices Prevention measures Nominated ground person Safe systems of work and supervision Familiarisation Rehearse rescue Pre-use checks Site supervision Competent Operators Key at ground control station Organised site
  10. 10. A Plan  Use Platform controls - Normal Auxiliary  Use ground controls - Normal Auxiliary  Contact service engineer  If serious or imminent risk consider basket to basket rescue
  11. 11. http://www.ipaf.org/en/publications/technical-guidance-notes/ Write it down
  12. 12. Recent court case – April 2013 11 April 2009 Westfield Shopping Centre Stratford- West London A 39 year old company employee was trapped between the guardrail of a scissor lift and some overhead ducting. A colleague was unable to release him and bring him down because he was unaware of how to use the emergency controls. Although XXXX XXXX cannot be held directly accountable for the death, the company should have ensured staff knew how to operate the equipment they were using. Fined £30,000 plus £29,000 in costs
  13. 13. HSE Statement  Familiarisation was inadequate  Industry guidance dictates that familiarisation is essential for anyone using MEWPs  Should be routinely assessed because controls vary between different makes and models http://www.ipaf.org/en/publications/technical-guidance-notes/
  14. 14. Communicate and practice Drills must include practising the use of the ground controls and emergency controls for each machine in use. Emergency control systems differ in design and position MEWP operators, supervisors and others involved must be briefed on and practice their emergency procedures
  15. 15. Rope evacuation WARNING! HSE is aware of several serious incidents and at least one fatal incident involving the use of rope evacuation systems These incidents predominantly occurred during training for rope escape
  16. 16. Summary  The need for emergency rescue is a rare event  When needed it must be done quickly and safely  Risk Assess and implement control measures  Develop a plan  Communicate and practice the plan  No rescue method should introduce in-proportionate to the risk  Having a mobile phone to call the emergency services is NOT an suitable or acceptable rescue plan. Thank you for your listening For more information about IPAF or any issues regarding the safe use of MEWPs please visit the IPAF website at www.ipaf.org
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