MCPV Library Citation Instruction

725 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
725
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

MCPV Library Citation Instruction

  1. 1. Using Information Ethically: Basics of Citations<br />Marymount College Library<br />
  2. 2. Basic Citation Elements<br />Every citation has certain components that are typically present:<br />Author/creator<br />Title of the book/article/web site<br />Title of the publication (if applicable)<br />Name of publisher/sponsoring organization<br />Date of publication<br />Note: With many web sources, you will need to search hard<br />to find this information, and you may not find it all.<br />
  3. 3. Unique Citation Elements<br />In addition to the basic components, different information sources may require extra information.<br />For example:<br />Print materials: page numbers<br />Online journal articles: name of database<br />Magazines or journals: volume and issue<br />Web source: URL and date accessed<br />Online photograph: name of museum/collection<br />
  4. 4. Works Cited vs. In-Text<br />What’s a Works Cited List?<br />An alphabetical list of all works that you consulted in writing your paper<br />Required evidence of where your ideas and facts came from<br />Appears at end of your paper<br />Example:<br />Chan, Evans. “Postmodernism and Hong Kong Cinema.” Postmodern Culture 10.3 (2000): n.pag. Project Muse. Web. 20 May 2002.<br />What are in-text citations?<br />Short references to sources in your Works Cited List <br />Requiredwherever you use others’ words, facts, images, or ideas<br />Appear throughout the body of your paper, woven into paragraphs<br />Example:<br />(Chan par. 3)<br />
  5. 5. Other Notes about In-Text<br />If you mention the author’s name in the text, only the page number appears in the citation<br />Example: <br />According to Chan, Hong Kong cinema gained international attention after decolonization (1).<br />If you use a web source without page numbers, use paragraph numbers instead<br /> Example:<br />President Obama’s story has been likened to that of Horatio Alger (Seaquist par. 9).<br />If the author/contributor is unknown, use the title of the work and enclose it in quotes<br />Example:<br />Harbor seals generally swim at depths of 10 – 20 meters (“PhocaVitulina Linnaeus, 1758” par. 1).<br />
  6. 6. http://www.thekingcenter.org/ProgServices/Default.aspx<br />How would you site this source in MLA?<br />
  7. 7. Suggested Works Cited Entry:<br />&quot;The Beloved Community of Martin Luther King, Jr.&quot; The King<br /> Center. The King Center. Web. 7 Jan. 2010. &lt;http://www.thekingcenter.org/ProgServices/Default.aspx&gt;.<br />Citation elements we could not find for this site:<br /><ul><li>Author / editor name
  8. 8. Creation date or last update</li></ul>Note: The inclusion of the URL (e.g. &lt;http…&gt;) is optional in MLA. Marymount Library recommends that you include it and that you also verify with your instructor his/her expectations.<br />
  9. 9. MLA In-Text Citation: How & Where?<br />Central to the philosophy of Martin Luther King Jr. was change through non-violence. Social change for African-Americans was necessary and long overdue, but MLK advocated that the means and the ends to achieving that change were equally important. In a famous published sermon from 1963, MLK encouraged his listeners and followers to love unconditionally, even though primal instincts may urge them to hate their historic oppressors. King believed that basis of injustice in all conflicts was man’s hostility to man - one he did not want to perpetuate any further.<br />&quot;The Beloved Community of Martin Luther King, Jr.&quot; The King<br /> Center. The King Center. 7 Jan. 2010. &lt;http://www.thekingcenter.org/ProgServices/Default.aspx&gt;.<br />
  10. 10. In-Text Citation Answer<br />Central to the philosophy of Martin Luther King Jr. was change through non-violence. Social change for African-Americans was necessary and long overdue, but MLK advocated that the means and the ends to achieving that change were equally important. In a published sermon from 1963 called “Loving Your Enemies”, MLK encouraged his listeners and followers to love unconditionally, even though primal instincts may compel them to hate their historic oppressors (“The Beloved Community” par. 10). King believed that basis of injustice in all conflicts was man’s hostility to man - one he did not want to perpetuate any further.<br />&quot;The Beloved Community of Martin Luther King, Jr.&quot; The King<br /> Center. The King Center. 7 Jan. 2010. &lt;http://www.thekingcenter.org/ProgServices/Default.aspx&gt;.<br />
  11. 11. For Help With Research<br />Ask your information coaches – Marymount librarians!<br />Walk-in Help: all the hours we are openE-mail: library@marymountpv.eduPhone: 310-303-7260IM: mcpvlibrary (AIM, Yahoo!, MSN)<br />Text: 424-241-2489<br />Visit our Ask-a-Librarian Services online!<br />

×