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Mark Sandeen MAS 2017

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Presentation at Massachusetts Sustainable Communities and Campuses Conference on March 17, 2017

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Mark Sandeen MAS 2017

  1. 1. Sustainable Success Lexington’s Lessons March 17, 2017
  2. 2. Lexington Sustainable History •  2005 - Sustainable Building Policy •  2009 - Interfaith Garden started •  2010 - Unanimous adoption Stretch Energy Code •  2011 - Sustainable Lexington created –  Better Buildings Program – 20% by 2020 –  Solar Task Force Formed •  2012 - LexFarm Community Farm established •  2012 - ACROSS Lexington Greenway Corridors •  2012 - EV Charging Stations installed
  3. 3. Lexington Sustainable History •  2013 - Climate Change Warrant Article passed •  2014 - Sustainability and Climate Action Plan •  2014 - Solarize Lexington & Rooftop Solar •  2015 - Community Choice Aggregation approved •  2016 - Getting to Net Zero Emissions Task Force •  2016 - Started composting at Town Schools •  2017 - Sustainable Building goals for better Health, Energy and Resilience. •  2017 - Super-emitter gas leak pilot program •  2017 - Lexington Energy Challenge
  4. 4. Coordinate activities to improve Lexington’s health, sustainability, and resilience A Sustainable Action Plan
  5. 5. Sustainability Action Plan •  Overall goal: Improve our quality of life and the desirability of living and working in Lexington •  Mitigation: Reduce greenhouse gas emissions and exposure to toxic and hazardous substances – Long-term goal: Getting to Net Zero emissions •  Adaptation/Resilience: Develop infrastructure to address future challenges and maximize community well-being – Long-term goal: Maintain essential services for ten days following extreme weather events
  6. 6. Climate Change is Here – Now! •  The Northeast has experienced a much greater increase in extreme storms than any other region in the United States. •  Massachusetts's summers are expected to be as warm as Virginia or South Carolina's summers in the next 25 - 50 years. •  Expect 90 days over 90° F and 24 days over 100° F each year •  We need to plan for a Sustainable Future
  7. 7. Emissions Priorities
  8. 8. Global Warming Solutions Act •  Emission Reduction Goals – 25% reduction by 2020 – 80% reduction by 2050 •  Primary Methods – Energy Efficiency / Demand Reduction – Greening the Grid • Community Choice accelerates our progress
  9. 9. What is Community Choice? •  Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) allows local governments the option of consolidating residential and commercial retail electricity demand to seek proposals for cleaner sources of power on behalf of their residents and businesses. Eversource
  10. 10. Reducing Lexington’s Footprint 100% green energy for less than Basic Service Standard offering to include 100% green energy for all participants A New England green option Optional offering includes 100% local renewable energy Otherwise, nothing else changes You will continue to receive one bill from Eversource Eversource will continue to deliver electricity, provide customer service, restore service after outages, & maintain poles and wires You can opt out at any time with no penalties or fees
  11. 11. Rooftop Solar Update •  Buildings – System Size 1.1 MW over 6 municipal buildings •  Economics – Expected Solar energy savings of $6 million – Health Benefits of $2 million
  12. 12. Hartwell Solar Update •  Ground mount & Solar canopies – System Size 2.2 MW on 4.5 acres •  Economics – Expected Solar energy savings of $13 million – Health Benefits of $4 million
  13. 13. Lexington Solar •  Rooftop, Ground mount & Solar canopies – 3.3 MW municipal over six rooftops and 4.5 acres – 1.1 MW residential over 168 homes •  Economics – Solar energy savings of $19 million – Generates 45% of Town’s municipal electricity demand •  Environmental Benefits ! 112 million pounds CO2 reductions ! 135 million miles of driving ! Health Benefits $8 million
  14. 14. Better Building Recommendations •  Set higher design standards for health and indoor environmental quality, energy, emissions, and resilience for our Town schools and buildings •  Define a process and path for improvements
  15. 15. Maximizing Solar Energy
  16. 16. Zero Emissions Design •  Natural Gas vs. Zero Emission Heat Pump – Heat Pump solution lower lifetime cost – Heat Pump solution 32% lower energy cost – Heat pump savings even greater as natural gas rises to world market prices •  But real decision is all about health – Local, Regional and Global Health
  17. 17. Cognitive Performance •  Lexington Board of Health recommends CO2 level of 600 ppm or less •  Consistent with Mass Dept. of Public Health guidelines
  18. 18. Better Buildings •  Green schools enhance students ability to learn – Clean and healthy air, natural sunlight – Thermal comfort, moisture control – Fewer sick days, heightens participation, better scores! •  Green schools lower total cost of ownership – High performance schools built with no premium – 45% lower energy demand – Cash flow positive from day 1 •  Green schools put money back in classrooms – Higher staff productivity and retention – Insulate budgets from energy price shocks
  19. 19. Net Zero Emissions Our 25 year goal is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from Lexington’s residential, commercial, and municipal buildings and to achieve a transition to renewable energy sources. Getting to Net Zero Emissions
  20. 20. Four Steps to achieve net zero emissions Report – Assessment of building’s performance Reduce – Energy efficiency improvements Produce – Maximize onsite renewable energy Purchase – Buy renewable electricity Report, Reduce, Produce, Purchase
  21. 21. •  Diversity is Key - All Major Stakeholders included •  Business Leaders / Community Leaders •  Large Commercial Property Owners •  Residential Property Owners / Real Estate •  Non-profit Leaders •  Architects / Green Building Engineer – Experts •  Town Committees: •  School Committee / Parents •  Planning / Economic Development Representatives •  Historic Districts / Historical Commission •  Sustainable Lexington / other Town Committees •  Selectmen / Town Staff Stakeholders Stakeholders
  22. 22. Getting Started •  Forming your team •  Engaging Stakeholders •  Building Credibility & Momentum •  Planning •  Procurement & Vendor Selection •  Securing Approvals
  23. 23. Forming your team •  Recruit a Sponsor on Town Staff with budget authority •  Create your Task Force – Town staff, resident experts, liaison from Energy, Sustainable, School, Finance committees and Selectmen
  24. 24. Engaging Stakeholders •  Conduct desktop solar assessment – Review site potential •  Using online tools •  Google Earth, PV Watts… – Secure energy bills – Calculate potential energy savings – Determine environmental benefits •  Secure energy committee endorsement •  Energize environmental groups •  Brief Board of Selectmen & School Committee
  25. 25. Building Momentum •  Hire 3rd party owner’s agent to validate – Economic potential & technical feasibility Extending across Town Property, Solar Potential ~ 2.6MW – 5.6MW $2 - $14 million in 20 year savings…..$0 Capital CO2 reduced by 114 million lbs. or 404 cars off the road. Hadley ~ 246 kW Capital = $0 Year 1 Savings > $17K - $26K
  26. 26. Planning / Best Practices •  Invite developers to meet with your team •  Ownership model – Municipal ownership – 3rd Party ownership •  Interconnection – Behind the meter – Virtual net meter
  27. 27. Procurement •  Review zoning / permitting / procurement regs – Pass any needed bylaw changes – Secure Zoning and Permit approvals •  Conduct Public Information Sessions
  28. 28. Vendor Selection •  RFQ – Request for Qualifications – Evaluation Criteria (keep it simple) •  Overall economic benefit to Town •  Financial strength & flexibility •  Experience, expertise & performance history •  Willingness to proceed at risk – Vendor Site visit required – Face to face interviews – Vendor selection validated by Town Manager
  29. 29. Negotiations •  Scope and Price – Structural Assessment
  30. 30. Negotiations •  Detailed Financial Analysis – Mid-life roof issues – Expected building life – Scenario based outcomes
  31. 31. Securing Approvals •  Buildings – Current Size 1.1 MW over 6 buildings •  Economics – Returns range from $2.7 million to $6.9 million •  Approvals Status ! School Committee ! HDC Review ! DPF Structural & Operational Review ! Finance Review ! Legal Review
  32. 32. Our Children’s Trust Secures Victory in Massachusetts Climate Change Lawsuit “only through an integrated strategy bringing together all parts of state and local government will we be able to address these threats effectively.” – Gov. Charlie Baker
  33. 33. Sustainable Lexington We develop programs to enhance Lexington's sustainability and resilience mark.sandeen@sustainablelexington.org http://sustainablelexington.org (781) 863-8784

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