The Caveman Calms The Thinker: Practical Strategies for <br />Your Coaching Practice<br />www.lynnekenney.com<br />
Right Now You Have A Choice<br />To Become a <br />Brain Ambassador<br />Join Us in our effort to <br />Improve the lives ...
Workshop Objectives<br />Introduce the coach and clinician to a New Era of thought in ADHD treatment. One that focuses on ...
How America Turned Parenting Upside Down<br />We began to believe that we could punish or consequence a person into a new ...
To Build Skills You Need A Foundation<br />Consequences<br />SKILL SETS<br />The Foundation: A Culture of Respect<br />
Welcome to Your Brain<br />The Thinker: Executive function, organization and planning<br />Inhibition<br />Shift<br />Self...
Domains of Functioning<br />The Developmental World of Your Client<br />Cognitive<br />Temperament<br />Social Emotional<b...
Major Brain Structures<br />
  Higher Order Cerebral Function<br />The Thinker<br />
EF: What Does it Do?<br />Executive Function (EF) refers to brain functions in the cerebral cortex that activate, organize...
Executive Function<br />What is it?<br />Thomas Brown breaks executive functions down into six different "clusters." <br /...
EF: Components<br />Working memory and recall (holding facts in mind while manipulating information; accessing facts store...
     Limbic Brain<br />       The Caveman<br />
Limbic Brain<br />The Caveman<br />
Have You Met Mr. Amygdala?<br />The amygdala is responsible for identifying threats to our well-being, and for sending out...
Your Brain on Anger<br />As you become angry your body's muscles tense up. Inside your brain, neurotransmitter chemicals k...
The Thinker Manages The Caveman<br />Although it is possible for your emotions to rage out of control, the prefrontal cort...
Prime The Caveman To Remain Calm<br />The adrenaline-caused arousal that occurs during anger lasts a very long time (many ...
F*Get You!<br />The same lingering arousal that keeps us primed for more anger also can interfere with our ability to clea...
Why We Calm The Caveman Then Engage The Thinker<br />High levels of arousal diminish attention and focus.<br />High level ...
STEPS TO CALMING THE CAVEMAN<br />Calm the limbic brain with movement and or sound.<br />Introduce the specific skill to b...
Five Secrets To Intervention<br />SELwww.kimochis.com<br />Music – Highest assoc w college graduation is reading and compe...
Kimochis™Keys to Communication<br />Call someone’s name, wait for eye contact, and give a communication tap, if necessary,...
Expressing Mad FeelingsThe Kimochis Way<br />I am aware I felt mad because ______<br />I used my calming skills so I could...
Methods For Calming The Caveman<br />SEL www.kimochis.com<br />Physical Movement www.sparkpe.org<br />Repetitive Movement ...
Sample Breakdown: Teaching Skills- Listening<br />I chose not to speak<br />I listened to someone speaking		<br />I nodded...
Our Call To Courage<br />Stepping Up Your Game<br />Develop a research-based not opinion based practice.<br />Respect the ...
Climb On The Brain Train<br />Join Twitter the fastest research site in America<br />RT brain-based research @DrLynneKenne...
Books For Your Library<br />The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science...
Let Us Change Lives!<br />I am personally inviting you to help us by being a Brain Ambassador. Join The Brain Train.  You ...
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Caveman Calms The Thinker ACO Coaches

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Caveman Calms The Thinker ACO Coaches

  1. 1. The Caveman Calms The Thinker: Practical Strategies for <br />Your Coaching Practice<br />www.lynnekenney.com<br />
  2. 2. Right Now You Have A Choice<br />To Become a <br />Brain Ambassador<br />Join Us in our effort to <br />Improve the lives of <br />100,000 families in 2011<br />
  3. 3. Workshop Objectives<br />Introduce the coach and clinician to a New Era of thought in ADHD treatment. One that focuses on the whole person not the diagnosis.<br />Introduce the coach and clinician to practical strategies across domains of functioning that can be used in every day practice.<br />Help the clinician use brain-based skills in their work.<br />
  4. 4. How America Turned Parenting Upside Down<br />We began to believe that we could punish or consequence a person into a new behavior. This may work in the moment but it does not build skill sets.<br />TODAY – We explore <br />How to build skill sets by understanding brain development.<br />The mechanics of building skill sets in ADHD and beyond.<br />
  5. 5. To Build Skills You Need A Foundation<br />Consequences<br />SKILL SETS<br />The Foundation: A Culture of Respect<br />
  6. 6. Welcome to Your Brain<br />The Thinker: Executive function, organization and planning<br />Inhibition<br />Shift<br />Self-regulation<br />Organization<br />Planning<br />Decision Making<br />The Caveman: Safe Vulnerable Dangerous/Fight Flight Freeze<br />Amygdala<br />Don’t reason with me when I am firing<br />
  7. 7. Domains of Functioning<br />The Developmental World of Your Client<br />Cognitive<br />Temperament<br />Social Emotional<br />Sensory<br />Kinesthetic<br />Fine Motor<br />Gross Motor<br />
  8. 8. Major Brain Structures<br />
  9. 9. Higher Order Cerebral Function<br />The Thinker<br />
  10. 10. EF: What Does it Do?<br />Executive Function (EF) refers to brain functions in the cerebral cortex that activate, organize, integrate and manage other functions. <br />It enables goal directed behavior.<br />It enhances sequencing, planning, organizing and task execution.<br />
  11. 11. Executive Function<br />What is it?<br />Thomas Brown breaks executive functions down into six different "clusters." <br />Organizing, prioritizing and activating for tasks <br />Focusing, sustaining and shifting attention to task <br />Regulating alertness, sustaining effort and processing speed <br />Managing frustration and modulating emotions <br />Utilizing working memory and accessing recall <br />Monitoring and self-regulating action <br />
  12. 12. EF: Components<br />Working memory and recall (holding facts in mind while manipulating information; accessing facts stored in long-term memory) <br />Activation, arousal and effort (getting started; paying attention; completing work) <br />Emotion control (tolerating frustration; thinking before acting or speaking) <br />Internalizing language (using self-talk to control one's behavior and direct future actions) <br />Complex problem solving (taking an issue apart, analyzing the pieces, reconstituting and organizing them into new ideas)<br />
  13. 13. Limbic Brain<br /> The Caveman<br />
  14. 14. Limbic Brain<br />The Caveman<br />
  15. 15. Have You Met Mr. Amygdala?<br />The amygdala is responsible for identifying threats to our well-being, and for sending out an alarm when threats are identified that results in us taking steps to protect ourselves. <br />The amygdala<br />Efficient<br />Fast <br />First<br />Dangerous, vulnerable, safe<br />READY FIRE AIM - Our brains are wired in such a way as to influence us to act before we can properly consider the consequences of our actions. <br />
  16. 16. Your Brain on Anger<br />As you become angry your body's muscles tense up. Inside your brain, neurotransmitter chemicals known as catecholamines are released causing you to experience a burst of energy lasting up to several minutes.<br />Fight Flight or Freeze<br />Narrows Attention <br />“Do not argue with me when my amygdala is firing.”<br />You're now ready to fight. <br />ArticleThe effects of stress and stress hormones on human cognition: Implications for the field of brain and cognition S.J. Lupiena, , , F. Maheub, M. Tuc, A. Fioccoa and T.E. Schrameka<br />
  17. 17. The Thinker Manages The Caveman<br />Although it is possible for your emotions to rage out of control, the prefrontal cortex of your brain, which is located just behind your forehead, can keep your emotions in proportion. <br />If the amygdala handles emotion, the prefrontal cortex handles judgment. <br />The left prefrontal cortex can switch off your emotions. It serves in an executive role to keep things under control. <br />Getting control over your anger means learning ways to help your prefrontal cortex get the upper hand over your amygdala so that you have control over how you react to anger feelings.<br />
  18. 18. Prime The Caveman To Remain Calm<br />The adrenaline-caused arousal that occurs during anger lasts a very long time (many hours, sometimes days), and lowers our anger threshold, making it easier for us to get angry again later on. <br />Though we do calm down, it takes a very long time for us to return to our resting state. <br />During this slow cool-down period we are more likely to get very angry in response to minor irritations that normally would not bother us. <br />
  19. 19. F*Get You!<br />The same lingering arousal that keeps us primed for more anger also can interfere with our ability to clearly remember details of our angry outburst. Arousal is vital for efficient remembering. <br />Moderate arousal levels help the brain to learn and enhance memory, concentration, and performance. <br />There is an optimum level of arousal that benefits memory, however, and when arousal exceeds that optimum level, it makes it more difficult for new memories to be formed. <br />High levels of arousal (such as are present when we are angry) significantly decrease your ability to concentrate. This is why it is difficult to remember details of really explosive arguments. Source: Harry Mills, Ph.D<br />
  20. 20. Why We Calm The Caveman Then Engage The Thinker<br />High levels of arousal diminish attention and focus.<br />High level of arousal limit EF activation.<br />High levels of arousal lead to forgetting.<br />
  21. 21. STEPS TO CALMING THE CAVEMAN<br />Calm the limbic brain with movement and or sound.<br />Introduce the specific skill to be trained.<br />Separate the skill into discrete parts.<br />Practice each component.<br />Model, experience then repeat.<br />Provide feedback.<br />Review the learned behavior.<br />Establish time frames for practice.<br />Provide consistent specific reinforcement.<br />
  22. 22. Five Secrets To Intervention<br />SELwww.kimochis.com<br />Music – Highest assoc w college graduation is reading and competently playing an instrument<br />Motor to Cognition – The Wii – Cross planes w thought<br />Movement – SPARKPE.org<br />Discrete Skill Sets – Break it down to avoid the melt-down<br />
  23. 23.
  24. 24. Kimochis™Keys to Communication<br />Call someone’s name, wait for eye contact, and give a communication tap, if necessary, before you speak.<br />Use a talking tone of voice instead of a fighting tone of voice.<br />Use a talking face and relaxed body language instead of a fighting face and tense body language.<br />Choose words that help instead of hurt. (“I feel mad because …” instead of “I hate it when …”)<br />Be brave and redo hurtful moments.<br />Be kind and let people try again.<br />Assume the best. (“He probably isn’t mad at me, maybe he is mad because he lost the game.”)<br />
  25. 25. Expressing Mad FeelingsThe Kimochis Way<br />I am aware I felt mad because ______<br />I used my calming skills so I could be mad without being mean.<br />I gained attention before speaking by calling a name, making eye contact and/or using a communication tap.<br />I chose my talking voice.<br />I chose my talking face and body.<br />I chose helpful words.<br />I feel proud I chose a positive way to communicate.<br />
  26. 26. Methods For Calming The Caveman<br />SEL www.kimochis.com<br />Physical Movement www.sparkpe.org<br />Repetitive Movement http://yogakids.com/<br />Rhythmic Breathing Take Five<br />Music/Stories Listening www.stressfreekids.com<br />Art Drawing Mandalas<br />Listen to a Raisin – Meditate<br />Visual Training www.cognibeat.com<br />
  27. 27. Sample Breakdown: Teaching Skills- Listening<br />I chose not to speak<br />I listened to someone speaking <br />I nodded my head to show I was listening <br />I repeated back what I heard, when asked <br />I asked a question when I did not understand<br />I remembered instructions <br />I followed the instructions <br /> <br />
  28. 28. Our Call To Courage<br />Stepping Up Your Game<br />Develop a research-based not opinion based practice.<br />Respect the inherent skills in your clients.<br />Read the research.<br />Join groups, forums and professional organizations for continuing education.<br />Read books, research articles, listen to podcasts, watch Youtube, develop a circle of professionals to call when you need to know more.<br />
  29. 29. Climb On The Brain Train<br />Join Twitter the fastest research site in America<br />RT brain-based research @DrLynneKenney<br />Read The Ultramind Solution Mark Hyman, MD<br />Consider Food - The Eat Clean Diet Tosca Reno<br />Read The Family Coach Method Lynne Kenney, PsyD<br />Implement - Growing an In Sync Child Carol Kranowitz<br />Be cutting edge with Howard Eaton, Norman Doidge, Daniel Pink and more<br />Be The Mindful Therapist: A Clinician's Guide to Mindsight and Neural Integration Daniel Siegel<br />Take Care - Therapist's Guide to Self-Care Lillie Weiss; Take Care Tips Jennifer Antkowiak<br />Know when to refer out!<br />
  30. 30. Books For Your Library<br />The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science (Hardcover) by Norman Doidge<br />Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain (Hardcover) by Oliver Sacks<br />Brain School by Howard Eaton<br />Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (Hardcover) by John J. Ratey<br />
  31. 31. Let Us Change Lives!<br />I am personally inviting you to help us by being a Brain Ambassador. Join The Brain Train.  You too can change lives. What can you do to spread brain-based parenting skills across the globe?1. Sign-up for my "Welcome to My Brain" ebook about your child's brain at www.lynnekenney.com2. Share one kernel of brain based education from my blog or from the sites of my team members Wendy Young, Sue Atkins, Deborah McNelis or #411 Voices.Then tell us what content you shared on Dr. Lynne Weighs In. 3. Tell the coaches, clinicians, and social workers you know about my May Training. http://lynnekenney.com/from-method-to-practice-in-30-days/<br /> 4. Teach emotional intelligence with Kimochis<br /> 5. Use physical tools such as the SparkPe.org curriculum for motor to cognition<br />

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