Debunking myths about reading

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Debunking myths about reading

  1. 1. Debunking Myths about Reading How Do Children Learn to Read Nancy Redding, M.Ed. May 2014
  2. 2. Myth: Reading is a Natural Process There is no “reading” area of brain Reading is a complex process involving many areas of the brain People develop new circuits in the brain as they learn to read
  3. 3. 5 Areas of Reading Identified by National Panel of Reading Phonemic awareness Phonics Fluency Vocabulary Comprehension
  4. 4. Myth: Students with reading difficulties cannot be identified until at least 2nd grade Research demonstrates that early intervention can actually make changes in brain function that may prevent long term difficulty
  5. 5. Early Symptoms of Reading Difficulty Delayed speech Mispronouncing words Disinterest in rhymes, words that begin alike, and other word play Difficulty learning letters and sounds Slow or inaccurate word retrieval Difficulty remembering spoken directions
  6. 6. Myth: Dyslexia means seeing words backwards Actually . . . . The majority of reading difficulties are phonologically based— an inability to hear and manipulate sounds within words
  7. 7. Important Facts about Dyslexia Originates in the brain Characterized by slow or inaccurate reading Can affect spelling, reading, and even math Caused by underlying deficits in phonological processing (and rapid naming) May result in secondary problems in reading comprehension Does not include, but can be accompanied by, emotional difficulties brought on by the frustration and failure of the student
  8. 8. Goal: All Children Reading With early identification and remediation, many reading problems can be avoided All primary teachers, reading specialists, and special education teachers should know: How to use research based, structured, explicit instruction to teach decoding skills to all children How to identify struggling readers How to use proven intervention techniques We know what to do; now we have to do it!

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