Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The application of Social Cognitive Theory in Information Science research on Workplace Learning and Innovative Work Behaviours

397 views

Published on

Full paper presented at the Information: interactions and impact (i3) conference 2017 at Robert Gordon University, June 27-30. More information at: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/research/conferences/i-2017/overview/

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The application of Social Cognitive Theory in Information Science research on Workplace Learning and Innovative Work Behaviours

  1. 1. The application of Social Cognitive Theory in Information Science research on workplace learning and innovative work behaviours Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org Presented by Lyndsey Jenkins Information: interactions and impact (i3) 2017 Co authors: Professor Hazel Hall and Professor Robert Raeside Edinburgh Napier University 1
  2. 2. Structure of presentation • Background to presentation • Value of Information Science perspective • Theoretical framework of doctoral study • Application of Social Cognitive Theory • Empirical work of doctoral study • Preliminary secondary data findings • Contributions to theory and practice Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 2
  3. 3. Background • Doctoral research • Funded by Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) • Supported by Skills Development Scotland (SDS) • Focus on theoretical framework Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 3
  4. 4. Innovation as a concept Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 4
  5. 5. Recognise Create Champion Implement Innovative work behaviour Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 5 Battisteli, Montani & Odardi (2013)
  6. 6. Influences on innovative work behaviour Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 6
  7. 7. Information Science Organisational Studies PsychologySupportive leaders Individual abilities Training Digital tools Appealing workspace ? IWB 7
  8. 8. Information science… Research Aim Gap Information Behaviour (e.g. Hauschildt, 1996) How information behaviours influence innovation Innovative work behaviours Information literacy (e.g. Crawford & Irving, 2009) How information literacy builds skills in the workplace How people learn Knowledge management (e.g Liau & Wu, 2010) How knowledge sharing influences organisations Individual learning Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 8
  9. 9. So what now? Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 9
  10. 10. Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 1986) A theoretical framework Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 10
  11. 11. Triadic reciprocal causation Pálsdóttir, A. (2013). Social cognitive theory. In Wilson, T. D. (Ed.). Theory in information behaviour research. Sheffield, UK: Eiconics Ltd. [E-book] ISBN 978-0-9574957-0-8. Intra-personal factors (cognitive) Environment (social) Behaviour Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 11
  12. 12. Concepts in SCT Self efficacy Learning orientation 12
  13. 13. But why this theory? • Model of Information Behaviour • Social learning theory • Operant conditioning • Classical conditioning https://lyndseyjenkins.org/2 016/08/02/developing-the- theoretical-framework/ Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 13
  14. 14. Theoretical framework That awkward moment when your supervisors welcome your idea with absolute silence… Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 14
  15. 15. Application to different domains Educational learning (e.g. Ellis-Ormrod, 2004) Career decision making (e.g. Blanco, 2011) Health promotion (e.g. Bandura, 2004) Leadership and management (e.g. Wood & Bandura, 1989) 15
  16. 16. • Information systems (see Carillo, 2010 for a review) • Information seeking and knowledge sharing (see Back & Kim, 2002; Pálasdóttir, 2013). • Information Behaviour (Case & Given, 2016, p.201; Ren, 2000) Application to information science Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 16
  17. 17. Model of Information Behaviour (Wilson, 1997) Application to theory development Model of Network Competence (Savolainen, 2002) Self efficacy Computers Information Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 17
  18. 18. Information literacy scale (Kurbanoglu et al., 2006) Application to scale development Information literacy Self-efficacy Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 18
  19. 19. So what now? Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 19
  20. 20. Empirical work Initial stage Secondary data analysis of European and UK innovation data 20
  21. 21. Data access • Eurostat online database  Open access  Free  Lots of data • Data used:  Community Innovation Survey  Training, education and development Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 21
  22. 22. Analysis procedure • Hierarchical cluster analysis • Comparison of group means • Analysis of variance (ANOVA) Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 22
  23. 23. Preliminary results 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Shareofinnovativeenterprises(%) Country Share of innovative enterprises (all innovation types) Figure 1: Share on innovative enterprises in European countries 23
  24. 24. Preliminary results Groups of clustered countries differed in types of innovation they presented Organisational innovation All types of innovation combined Product innovation Process innovation High level investment Medium level investment Low level investment Marketing innovation 24
  25. 25. Preliminary results Groups of clustered countries differed in factors that could influence innovation research and development expenditure external international collaboration vocational training international markets High level investment Medium level investment Low level investment 25
  26. 26. Empirical work ApplicationCase study • Determinants • Measure learning success • Information behaviours 26
  27. 27. Contributions GAP IN KNOWLEDGE CONTRIBUTION How individuals and collectives develop capabilities to innovate • Develop knowledge on specific requirements as to how individuals develop the capability to innovate Specifc role of culture and strategy • Develop knowledge on how culture and strategy specifically contribute to the development of innovative work behaviours How different types of workplace learning suit different workplace contexts • Highlight contextual differences of workplace learning • Develop knowledge on sector differences of workplace learning practices Specific determinants of successful workplace learning from both organisational studies and information science perspectives (in combination) • Develop knowledge on requirements of successful workplace learning on individual (workplace learning) and collective (organisational learning) levels • Framework development • Incorporate knowledge from multiple literature domains (including theory) 27
  28. 28. Conclusions • Theories can be ‘borrowed’ from other disciplines if the decision is justified • Justification can be from previous studies and the theory application • Social Cognitive Theory has been used in information science but…  Not in workplace learning and innovation  Not in a multidisciplinary study • Incorporating multiple perspectives into one study  Adds value to the study (practical and theoretical)  Facilitates knowledge sharing between disciplines • Data suggests that factors influence national innovation Twitter: @LJenk2015Email: L.Jenkins@napier.ac.uk PhD blog: lyndseyjenkins.org 28
  29. 29. References • Anderson, N., Potočnik, K., & Zhou, J. (2014). Innovation and creativity in organizations: A state-of-the-science review, prospective commentary, and guiding framework. Journal of Management, 40(5), 1297–1333. • Bandura, A. (1986). Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social Cognitive Theory. Prentice Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ. • Bandura, A. (2004). Health Promotion by Social Cognitive Means. Health Education & Behaviour, 31(2), 143-164. • Battistelli, A., Montani, F., & Odoardi, C. (2013). The impact of feedback from job and task autonomy in the relationship between dispositional resistance to change and innovative work behaviour. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 22(1), 26–41. http://doi.org/10.1080/1359432X.2011.616653 • Blanco, A. (2011). Applying Social Cognitive Career Theory to predict interests and choice goals in statistics in Spanish psychology students. Journal of Vocational Behaviour, 78(1), 49-58. • Carillo, K.D. (2010). Social Cognitive Theory in IS Research – Literature Review, Criticism, and Research Agenda. In S.K. Prasad., H.M. Vin., S. Shani., M.P. Jaiswal., & B. Thipakon. (Eds). Proceedings of the 4th International Conference, ICISTM 2010: Information Systems, Technology and Management (pp.20-31). Germany: Springer. • Case, D.O., & Given, L.M. (2016). Looking for Information: A survey of research on information seeking, needs and behaviour (4th ed.). Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. • Crawford, J., & Irving, C. (2009). Information literacy in the workplace: a qualitative exploratory study. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 41(1), 29-38. • Ellinger, A.D., & Cseh, M. (2007). Contextual factors influencing the facilitation of others' learning through everyday work experiences. Journal of Workplace Learning, 19(7), 435-452. • Ellis-Ormrod, J. (2004). Human learning. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Prentice Hall. • Ferincz, A., Hortoványi, L. (2014). Beyond Human-Computer Collaboration: Supporting and HinderingFactors of On-the-Job Learning. An Enterprise Oddysey, 847–868. • Hauschildt, J. (1996). Innovation, Creativity and Information Behaviour. Creativity and Innovation Management, 5(3), 169-178. • Kurbanoglu, S. S., Akkoyunlu, B. & Umay, A. (2006). Developing the information literacy self-efficacy scale. Journal of Documentation, 62(6), 730-743 • Liao, S., & Wu, C. (2010). System perspective of knowledge management, organizational learning, and organizational innovation. Expert Systems with Applications 37(2), 1096-1103. • Mamaqi, X. (2015). The efficiency of different ways of informal learning on firm performance: A comparison between, classroom, web 2 and workplace training. Computers in Human Behavior, 51, 812–820. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.11.080 • Oksanen, K., & Ståhle, P. (2013). Physical environment as a source for innovation: investigating the attributes of innovative space. Journal of Knowledge Management, 17(6), 815–827. http://doi.org/10.1108/JKM-04-2013-0136 • Pálsdóttir, A. (2013). Social cognitive theory. In Wilson, T. D. (Ed.). Theory in information behaviour research. Sheffield, UK: Eiconics Ltd. [E-book] ISBN 978-0-9574957-0-8. • Savolainen, R. (2002). Network competence and information seeking on the Internet: From definitions towards a social cognitive model. Journal of Documentation, 58(2), 211-226, doi: 10.1108/00220410210425467 • Ren, W-H. (2000). Library instruction and college student self-efficacy in electronic information searching. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 26(5), 323– 328. • Wilson, T. D. (1997). Information behaviour: An interdisciplinary perspective. Information Processing and Management, 33(4), 551-572. 29
  30. 30. • Slide 4 – human head - http://productinnovationnow.com/innovation-definition/ • Slide 9 – group - http://blog.crisp.se/2016/04/04/mattiasskarin/12-seemingly-normal-things-agile-people- do/agile-behaviours-now-b • Slide 10 – social system - https://worldviewintelligence.com/worldview-programs-and- consulting/applying-worldview-intelligence-to-social-systems/ • Slide 12 – self efficacy - https://communicatehealth.com/2014/01/i-think-i-can-i-think-i-can-a-tribute-to- self-efficacy/ • Slide 12 – learning orientation - http://www.histproject.no/node/389 • Slide 12 – happy learners - http://www.lumesselearning.com/tag/ots-learning/ • Slide 15 – educational learning - http://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/classroom • Slide 15 – career decision making -https://smartbcamp.com/making-wrong-career-decisions/ • Slide 15 – healthcase - http://ihpe.org.uk/ • Slide 15 – learning management - http://www.atc-training.org/leadership-management • Slide 16 – social cognitive theory - https://www.pinterest.com/explore/social-cognitive-theory/ • Slide 18 – information literacy - https://www.lynda.com/Higher-Education-tutorials/Information- Literacy/368046-2.html • Slide 18 – self efficacy - https://success-mohawk.com/2017/02/24/academic-self-efficacy-upgrading- your-nexttop-computer/ • Slide 21 – data - http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/database • Slide 26 – networking - http://www.hotel-industry.co.uk/2015/05/hotel-industry-a-changing-business- landscape/ Image credits 30

×