Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Lifespan Psychology Module 7 Early Adulthood Powerpoint

14,731 views

Published on

CC-BY-SA 3.0 Lifespan Psychology Module 7 Early Adulthood Powerpoint by Laura Overstreet: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B9nrmpuRmC4ENjVGdVo3dVh6NzQ&usp=sharing

Published in: Education
  • Dating direct: ♥♥♥ http://bit.ly/2ZDZFYj ♥♥♥
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Dating for everyone is here: ❶❶❶ http://bit.ly/2ZDZFYj ❶❶❶
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Lifespan Psychology Module 7 Early Adulthood Powerpoint

  1. 1. Early Adulthood A Look at the 20s and 30s
  2. 2. Physical Development A Look at Physical Development During the 20s and 30s
  3. 3. Physical Endurance  Physiological peak during the early 20s  30s: slow, gradual decline  Lose lung reserve capacity  Due to lack of exercise
  4. 4. Sexual Responsive  Men are most sexually responsive in their late teens and early 20s  Women become more sexually responsive in their late 30s on
  5. 5. Sexual Reproduction  10% of reproductive population: infertility  Males-low sperm count or unhealthy sperm  Females-failure to ovulate; pelvic inflammatory disease  One-third of couples conceive without treatment  Half with treatment still don’t conceive
  6. 6. Fertility Treatments  85-90% fertility drugs  In vitro fertilization (5% cases)  5-30% success rate  GIFT (gamete intra-fallopian transfer)  Sperm and ova into fallopian tube  ZIFT (zygote intra-fallopian transfer)
  7. 7. Problems Which Peak During Early Adulthood  Drug Abuse  Peaks between 19-22  Impairs judgment  Associated with acquaintance rape  Sexually transmitted infections  Violent Death in males
  8. 8. Cognitive Development A Look at Adult Thinking
  9. 9. Postformal Thinking  What’s the difference between a 14 year old and a 34 year old in terms of thinking?  Experience  Practicality and realism  Postformal Thinking is both abstract, realistic, and personal
  10. 10. Dialectical Thought  Adolescents: dichotomous thinkers  Adults: Dialectical thought  Education promotes this  Leads to greater tolerance
  11. 11. Educational Concerns  What is the relationship between higher education and the workplace?  Bok: the two should be more closely aligned  Global awareness  Communicative skills  Moral reasoning  Lack of rigor in higher education?
  12. 12. Psychosocial Development A Look At the Social World of People in Their 20s and 30s
  13. 13. Developmental Tasks of Early Adulthood  Independence  Identity  Emotional Stability  Career  Intimacy  Community  Residence  Parenting
  14. 14. Developmental Tasks of Early Adulthood  Future focus  Emphasis on age/experience  Decision-making based on what others think  Goal is to be seen as an adult
  15. 15. Theories of Early Adulthood: Levinson  Early adult transition  Entering the adult world  Age 30 transition  Settling down  Midlife transition
  16. 16. Theories of Early Adulthood: Erikson Intimacy vs. Isolation
  17. 17. Friendships As A Source of Intimacy  Opposite sexed friendships  Friendships between males  Friendships between females
  18. 18. Partners As A Source of Intimacy: Cohabitation  How many cohabiting couples?  7.5 million; 800,000 same-sex couples  How long?  Half end within a year; longer in Europe  Shorter for younger partners  Rates are changing in the United States
  19. 19. Why Cohabit?  Premarital cohabitation  Dating cohabitation  Trial marriage  Testing ‘marriage’ not a partner  Substitute marriage  40% of these last 5-7 years
  20. 20. Same-Sex Couples  Marriage legal in Spain, Canada, Belgium, Argentina, Norway, Iceland, the Netherlands, South Africa, and Denmark  Couple issues no different  Greater equality between partners  Break-up and continued contact
  21. 21. Mate Selection  Median Age of 1st Marriage: 25 females; 27 males  Social Exchange Theory: The Marriage Market and social currency  A Fair Exchange  The Principle of Least Interest  Homogamy  Endogamy, exogamy, propinquity
  22. 22. Sternberg’s Triangular Approach to Love Love has three elements:  Intimacy is the emotional component of a relationship.  Passion is the motivational piece of the relationship, (arousal and attraction).  Commitment represents the cognitive dimension of a relationship.
  23. 23. Sternberg’s Types of Love  Liking  Infatuation  Empty Love  Romantic Love  Companionate Love  Fatuous Love  Consummate Love
  24. 24. Styles of Love A Look at Several Type Theories on Love
  25. 25. John Lee’s Six Styles of Love  Pragma - down-to-earth (pragmatic) style of love.  Agape - altruistic, partners are completely selfless, always giving without expecting something in return.  Mania - characterized as possessive and obsessive; demanding, insecure, volatile
  26. 26. John Lee’s Six Styles of Love  Eros-overpowering, erotic love in which a person feels consumed  Ludus-carefree and nonpossessive; more fun than commitment  Storge-love that develops slowly over time; begins as friendships; (if they break up, they remain friends)
  27. 27. Frames of Relationships  In this type of relationship, partners lean on one another and have little sense of self  Considered dependent  If one partner changes, the other will fall
  28. 28. Frames of Relationships  In this type of relationship, partners lives are parallel  Considered independent  If one leaves, the other might not notice
  29. 29. Frames of Relationships  In this type of relationship, partners have a strong life as a couple, but also are able to stand alone  Considered interdependent  If one leaves, the other will hurt, but can survive
  30. 30. Social Psychological Theories  Reiss’s Wheel Theory of Love Rapport Self-revelation Mutual dependency Need fulfillment
  31. 31. Process of Disaffection: Breaking Up  Before: “Little Fictions”  Beginning Phase: Psychological Breakup  Middle Phase: Disappointment  End Phase: Hopelessness

×