4Finnish Noun InflectionPAUL K IPARSKY1 IntroductionInflected words in Finnish show a range of interdependent stem and suffix...
110 / PAUL K IPARSKY   (1)          Stem phonology                Word phonology             Postlexical Phonology   I ass...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 1112 Stress2.1 The Finnish stress systemThe descriptive generalizations. Speaking for the mom...
112 / PAUL K IPARSKY              f.   N ON -F INAL: The final syllable is not stressed.              g.   S TRESS - TO -W ...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 113Tableau (7) shows how ternary feet result from the interaction of (6g-i).3   Final heavy s...
114 / PAUL K IPARSKY                    amat¨ ori, pulituuri                         o¨                 2. Five syllables:...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 115the entire stem contained only neutral vowels. In other words, harmony thentakes its cue o...
116 / PAUL K IPARSKYpurposes of vowel harmony.7 (12)       Stem-final rhythmic stress never initiates a vowel harmony domai...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 117duces geminate voiceless stops to single voiceless stops, and single voicelessstops to voi...
118 / PAUL K IPARSKY (17)          a. judoka ‘judo practitioner’, paprika ‘bell pepper, paprika’, karak-                  ...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 119          a.    /nouse-taC/      nous.taC      ‘rise’         (Cons.Grad.)          b.    ...
120 / PAUL K IPARSKY3.2 Optionality and complementarityMovable polysyllabic stems. A stem-final vowel combines with the plu...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 121    In contrast, Consonant Gradation never applies before a derived diphthongin the second...
122 / PAUL K IPARSKYComplementarity of Stop Deletion and Consonant Gradation. The twoalternations of Stop Deletion and Con...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 123stop does not undergo Stop Deletion after them. (36)   a. /palttoo-i-ssa/  palt.tois.sa *p...
124 / PAUL K IPARSKYword phonology. Stop Deletion and Consonant Gradation are conditioned bystem-level stress and by stem-...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 125   The dominant status of S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT precludes light syllablesfrom getting rhyt...
126 / PAUL K IPARSKYparameter of variation was identified in Wiik 1967 as the syllabification ofthe stem-final diphthong, whi...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 127On the stress option (44a), diphthongs trigger Consonant Gradation (e.g.Prt.Pl. m´ llak` i...
128 / PAUL K IPARSKY  (45) W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS           *Nucw                        (where Nucw denotes an unstressed s...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 129prevent regular diphthongs from being realized as monomoraic. This is thedesired outcome. ...
130 / PAUL K IPARSKY (48)        Diphthongs: /oi/             W T- TO -S TR   M AX-V    O NSET        a.                  ...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 131         Long diphthongs: /ooi/           W T- TO -S TR   M AX-V   O NSET         a.      ...
132 / PAUL K IPARSKY1997.Stop Deletion reformulated. The context of Stop Deletion also becomessimpler and more natural. In...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 133    Functionally, lexical secondary stresses pattern with predictable word-initial primary...
134 / PAUL K IPARSKY (51) Derivation of lakkojen ‘strikes’ (Gen.Pl.) and almanakkojen ‘almanacs’      (Gen.Pl.) under the ...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 135(52) Derivation of mellakkojen ‘riots’ (Gen.Pl.) and Amerikkojen ‘Ameri-     cas’ (Gen.Pl....
136 / PAUL K IPARSKY (53) Derivation of mellakoiden ‘riots’ (Gen.Pl.) and Amerikoiden ‘Ameri-      cas’ (Gen.Pl.) under th...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 1373.6 Morphological and lexical evidenceStress-conditioned illative allomorphy. The illative...
138 / PAUL K IPARSKYof the illative, h is deleted except after primary stress, and V is a copy of thepreceding vowel. The ...
F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 139singular forms surface in the word phonology as v´ .paa, v´ .paa.seen.                    ...
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  1. 1. 4Finnish Noun InflectionPAUL K IPARSKY1 IntroductionInflected words in Finnish show a range of interdependent stem and suffixalternations which are conditioned by syllable structure and stress. In a pen-etrating study, Anttila (1997) shows how the statistical preferences amongoptional alternants of the Genitive Plural can be derived from free constraintranking. I propose an analysis which covers the rest of the nominal morphol-ogy and spells out the phonological constraints that interact to produce thealternations, and show how it supports a stratal version of OT phonology.1 In the model of stratal OT that I will be assuming, stems, words, andphrases are subject to distinct parallel constraint systems, which may dif-fer in the ranking of constraints. These levels interface serially: the outputof the stem morphology and phonology is the input to the word morphologyand phonology, and the output of the word morphology and phonology is theinput to the syntax and postlexical phonology. 1 I am deeply indebted to Arto Anttila for discussing this material with me over many years,and for commenting on this latest effort of mine to make sense of it.Generative Approaches to Finnic and Saami Linguistics.Diane Nelson and Satu Manninen (eds.).Copyright c 2003, CSLI Publications. 109
  2. 2. 110 / PAUL K IPARSKY (1) Stem phonology Word phonology Postlexical Phonology I assume that the constraint system of level n+1 may differ in rankingfrom constraint system of level n by promotion of one or more constraints toundominated status. These may be faithfulness constraints as well as marked-ness constraints. No crucial ranking among the promoted constraints is re-quired, at least in the cases studied so far. The stem phonology corresponds to Lexical Phonology’s level 1 and theword phonology corresponds to Lexical Phonology’s level 2; together theyconstitute what is traditionally called the lexical phonology. The Finnish datato be examined mostly have to do with word-internal phonological processes,so it is the distinction between the stem and word levels within the lexicalphonology which will carry the explanatory burden. Diverging from previous approaches to level-ordering, I will assume threetypes of affixes: (2) a. Stem-to-stem affixes: [ [ X ]Stem + Affix ]Stem b. Stem-to-word affixes: [ [ X ]Stem + Affix ]Word c. Word-to-word affixes (lexical clitics): [ [ X ]Word + Affix ]WordStems must satisfy the stem phonology, and words must satisfy the wordphonology. The levels and categories are assumed to be universal, but theallocation of morphemes to them is not predictable, and not all languagesnecessarily have all types. For example, inflectional endings are attached towords in English, but to stems in Finnish. Opacity effects (counterfeeding and counterbleeding) result from maskingof the constraint system of one level by the constraint system of a later level.Therefore, stratal OT entails the following restrictions on the interaction ofprocesses: (3) .Constraints are transparent, except that .postlexical processes can mask stem-level and word-level processes, and .word-level processes can mask stem-level processes.
  3. 3. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 1112 Stress2.1 The Finnish stress systemThe descriptive generalizations. Speaking for the moment in derivationalterms, Finnish stress is assigned by laying down binary feet from left to right.Final syllables are not stressed if they are light, and only optionally if they are `heavy. An important phenomenon is the L H EFFECT: when the left-to-rightscansion encounters a Light-Heavy sequence, the light syllable is skipped,with the result that a ternary foot is formed. At the left edge of a word, the `LH effect is superseded by the inviolable requirement that a word must haveinitial stress. The basic alternating stress pattern is shown in (4): (4) a. (k´ .las)(t` .let) ‘you’re fishing’ a e b. (k´ .las)(t` .le)(m`.nen) ‘fishing’ a e ı c. (´l.moit)(t` u.tu)(m`.nen) ‘registering’ ı a ı d. ´ ` ` (j¨ r.jes)(t` .le)(m¨ t.t¨ )(m` y.des)(t¨ n.s¨ ) ‘from his lack of sys- a e a o y a a tematization’ ` The ternary feet resulting from the LH effect are seen in (5) (the relevantLH sequences in boldface): (5) ´ ` a. X X L H X: (k´ .las.te)(l` m.me) ‘we’re fishing’ a e ´ ` ` b. X X X X L H X: (´l.moit)(t` u.tu.mi)(s` s.ta) ‘registering’ (Elat.Sg.) ı a e c. X´ X X X L H X X X: (j¨ r.jes)(t` l.m¨ l.li)(s` y.del)(l¨ .ni) ‘my ` ` ` ´ a e a y ` a systematicity’ (Adess.Sg.) ´ ` ` ` ´ ` d. X X X X X X L H X: (j¨ r.jes)(t` l.m¨ l)(l`s.t¨ .m¨ )(t¨ n.t¨ ) ‘un- a e a ı a a o a systematized’ (Prt.Sg.) ´ ` ` e. X X L H X L H X: (v´ i.mis.te)(lut.te.le)(m` s.ta) ‘having caused o ` a to do gymnastics’ (Elat.Sg.)The constraints. In constraint-based terms, Finnish can be characterized bythe system in (6) (building on Hanson & Kiparsky 1996 and on Elenbaas &Kager 1999, which should be consulted for more detailed information andreferences). (6) a. *C LASH : No stresses on adjacent syllables. b. L EFT- HEADEDNESS : The stressed syllable is initial in the foot. c. A LIGN (P RW D , L EFT; F T, L EFT ) (“The left edge of every Prosodic Word coincides with the left edge of a foot.”) Abbre- viated as A LIGN -L EFT. d. F OOT-B IN : Feet are minimally bimoraic and maximally disyl- labic. e. *L APSE: Every unstressed syllable must be adjacent to a stressed syllable or to the word edge (Elenbaas and Kager 1999).
  4. 4. 112 / PAUL K IPARSKY f. N ON -F INAL: The final syllable is not stressed. g. S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT: Stressed syllables are heavy. h. L ICENSE - : Syllables are parsed into feet. i. A LIGN (F OOT, L EFT; P RW D , L EFT ) (“The left edge of every foot coincides with the left edge of some Prosodic Word”.) Ab- breviated as A LL -F T-L EFT. `The LH effect is here taken to be a manifestation of S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT:a light syllable rejects a secondary stress if it can be placed on the follow-ing heavy syllable instead (without violating the higher-ranked *C LASH and*L APSE, of course).2 (7) S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT A LL -F T-L EFT N ON -F INAL L ICENSE - A LIGN -L *C LASH *L APSE Input: /opiskelija/ 1a. (´ .pis)(k` .li)ja o e ** * 2 1b. (´ .pis)ke(l`.ja) o ı ** * 3 1c. o(p´s.ke)(l`.ja) ı ı * * * 1,3 1d. (´ .pis)ke.li.ja o * * *** 1e. (´ )(p´s)(k` .li).ja o ı e * ** * 1,3 Input: /opetta-ma-ssa/ 2a. (´ .pet)ta(m` s.sa) o a * * 3 2b. (´ .pet)(t` .mas)sa o a ** 2 Input: /kalastele-t/ 3a. (k´ .las)te(l` t) a e * * * 3 3b. (k´ .las)(t` .let) a e ** 2 3c. (k´ .las)te.let a * * ** 2 Some light inflectional endings, such as Essive Singular -na and the possessive suffixes (e.g.-ni ‘my’) are preaccenting, as though they made the preceding syllable heavy. The *C LASH con-straint then blocks secondary stress on the syllable before it, e.g. /opetta-ja-na/ (´ .pet.ta)(j` .na) o a‘teacher’ (Ess.Sg.). When two such preaccenting suffixes occur in a row, the regular phonolog-ical pattern reappears, e.g. /opetta-ja-na-ni/ (´ .pet)(t` .ja)(n` .ni) ‘my teacher’ (Ess.Sg.). On the o a aproposed analysis, *C LASH prevents both preaccents from appearing, and F OOT-B IN togetherwith L ICENSE -σ decide in favor of the second.
  5. 5. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 113Tableau (7) shows how ternary feet result from the interaction of (6g-i).3 Final heavy syllables can optionally be stressed. See Elenbaas and Kager1999:305 for an account of the basic option in terms of free constrant ranking.The frequency of this alternative seems to be proportional to the heaviness ofthe syllable, e.g. (r´ .vin)to(l` t) (r´ .vin)to(l` a) (r´ .vin)to(l` an). a a a a a a2.2 Lexical vs. rhythmic secondary stress `Long stems and the LH effect. Polysyllabic stems in Finnish fall into twoaccentual types, MOVABLE and FIXED. They are most clearly distinguish-able by the morphological and morphophonological properties that we shallinvestigate below, but there are also more direct, albeit somewhat elusive,phonological differences between them. Movable polysyllables have a rhyth-mic secondary stress which oscillates between the third or fourth syllable, `normally according to the weight of those syllables, in line with the LH ef-fect. Fixed polysyllables have a lexical secondary stress which is invarianton a given syllable of the stem. Although the nominative singulars of mov-able and fixed stems have the same output stress pattern, their inflected forms(Inessive and Ablative Singulars, in these examples) diverge as follows. ` (8) Movable stress (LH effect in inflection): a. K´ lev` la ?*K´ lev` lassa a a a a K´ leval` ssa a a ‘Kalevala’ ´ ı ´ b. Amer`kka ?*Amer`kassaı ´ Amerik` ssa a ‘America’ c. artikk` li ?*´ rtikk` lissa ´ e a e artikkel`ssa ´ ı ‘article’ d. apteekk` ri ?*´ pteekk` rilla apteekkar`lla ‘pharmacist’ ´ a a a ´ ı ` (9) Fixed stress (no LH effect): ´ a a. Alab` ma ´ a ´ Alab` massa ?*Alabam` ssaa ‘Alabama’ b. p´ lstern` kka p´ lstern` kassa ?*p´ lsternak` ssa a a a a a a ‘parsnip’ c. esplan` di ´ a esplan` dilla ?*´ splanad`lla ´ a e ı ‘esplanade’Marking stem-level stress with the IPA accent mark ( we have / bama/, ), ala/ palsternakka/ etc. Other examples of this stress contrast in polysyllabic loanwords are givenin (10). (10) a. Stems with fixed penult stress (inflected like disyllabic stems): 1. Four syllables: barrikadi, paragrafi, portugali, serenadi, aladobi, sarkofagi, ortopedi, privilegi, kalomeli, kapitteli, filosofi, etanoli, ekonomi, megafoni, makaroni, invalidi, pyramidi, melaniini, margariini, molekyyli, mannekiini, 3 The undominated foot-wellformedness constraints L EFT- HEADEDNESS and F OOT-B IN areomitted from the tableau. Violations of A LIGN (F OOT, L EFT; P RW D , L EFT ) are assessed, asusual, by toting up the number of syllables that separate each foot from the left edge of the word;almost any other method would do as well.
  6. 6. 114 / PAUL K IPARSKY amat¨ ori, pulituuri o¨ 2. Five syllables: adrenaliini, antropologi, kolesteroli, konkvis- tadori, magnetofoni, pyramidoni, asetyleeni b. Movable stems (inflected like trisyllabic stems): 1. Four syllables: asessori, hantlankari, salpietari, triangeli, artikkeli, partikkeli, monokkeli, tuberkkeli, konstaapeli, meanderi, kalenteri, silinteri, sylinteri, oraakkeli, korri- dori, makrospori, professori, senaattori 2. Five syllables: alabasteri, gladiaattori, plagiaattori, pro- vokaattori, oleanteri Six-syllable stems normally break down into three feet, e.g. Prt.Pl. ´ntel-ıl` ktu` lleja (not *´ntell` ktu` lleita) ‘intellectuals’, Gen.Pl. eksist` ntial`stien e e ı e e ´ e ı e e ı `(not *´ ksist` ntial`steiden) ‘existentialist’, unless the LH effect dictates a tri-syllabic first foot, e.g. k´ talys` attori ‘catalyst’, in which case the word inflects a alike a three-syllable word. The essential distinction between rhythmic and lexical stress is that therhythmic stress is invisible to the morphology and to the stem-level (morpho)-phonology, while lexical stress is visible. It is not a matter of distinctiveness orpredictability; in fact, Anttila (1997 and p.c.) has shown that the distributionof lexical secondary stresses is largely predictable from weight and sonority,although there seems to be a residue of variation. Most heavy penults in longstems are lexically stressed, with movable stems like Amerikka being the ex-ception. Light penults tend to be lexically unstressed, but there is a substantialclass of lexically stressed light penults in “learned” loanwords.4 Anttila (p.c.)points out that vowel quality, and even the weight and quality of the precedingand following syllables, determine the place of the stress. His generalizationis roughly that if the second stem syllable is light, the third syllable is lexi-cally stressed even if it is light, unless it is followed by a syllable with a moresonorous vowel.Vowel harmony. Another phonological criterion for distinguishing betweenrhythmic and lexical secondary stress comes from the harmonic alternationbetween front vowels a,¨ ,¨ and back vowels a,o,u in suffixes. Stems contain- ¨ ouing only neutral vowels regularly take front vowels, while words containinga mix of back vowels and the neutral vowels i, e regularly take back vowels.However, lexical secondary stress may optionally initiate a new domain ofvowel harmony: if such a secondary stress falls on a neutral vowel, and allfollowing stem vowels are neutral, the ending may have front harmony, as if 4 Many of them used to have long vowels, but this is considered incorrect now, perhaps be-cause it looks like Swedish influence. Examples of such older, now disreputable spellings, stillcommon in pronunciation, are barrikaadi, esplanaadi, serenaadi, filosoofi, invaliidi, pyramiidi.
  7. 7. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 115the entire stem contained only neutral vowels. In other words, harmony thentakes its cue only from the second half of the stem, beginning with the lex-ically accented syllable. For example, arkkitehdi-lla ‘architect’ (Adess.Sg.)has a fully acceptable alternant arkkitehdi-ll¨ , comparable to an all-neutral aword like lehdi-ll¨ ‘leaves’ (Adess.Pl.) (see Ringen and Hein¨ m¨ ki 1999).5 a a a (11) a. Lexical stress often initiates a vowel harmony domain: arkkit` hdilta ´ e arkkit` hdilt¨ ´ e a ‘architect’ (Ablat.Sg.) b´ lˇev`killa os ı b´ lˇev`kill¨ os ı a ‘bolshevik’ (Adess.Sg.) k´ ram` lleja a e k´ ram` llej¨ a e a ‘candy’ (Prt.Pl.) p´ ram`dista y ı p´ ram`dist¨ y ı a ‘pyramid’ (Elat.Sg.) b. Rhythmic stress very seldom initiates a vowel harmony domain: artikkel`lla ´ ı ?*´ rtikkel`ll¨ a ı a ‘article’ (Adess.Sg.) pr´ fessor` ita o e ?*pr´ fessor` it¨ o e a ‘professor’ (Prt.Pl.) str´ tegis` sta a e ?*str´ tegis` st¨ a e a ‘strategic’ (Elat.Sg.) k´ lenter`sta a ı ?*k´ lenter`st¨ a ı a ‘calendar’ (Elat.Sg.) On the basis of their harmonic behavior, fixed stems have often been ana-lyzed as QUASI - COMPOUNDS, i.e. as compounds from the prosodic point ofview, though not from the morphological point of view.6 The quasi-compoundanalysis can be linked to the above observations about stress, though I believethe connection is a somewhat indirect one, in the following sense. Since com-pounds consist of at least two phonological words or stems, each of whichmust have a stress, stems are good candidates for reanalysis as prosodic com-pounds if they contain two stem-level stresses. That is why fixed polysyllablesare much more likely to be analyzed as compounds than movable polysyl-lables. However, the double stress merely invites the compound reanalysis,it does not force it. Fixed polysyllables can very well be treated as singleprosodic words, as their harmonic variation confirms. The mediating role of morphology is supported by two further points. Tri-syllabic words are never treated as quasi-compounds, presumably because asingle syllable could never be mistaken for one half of a compound. Theirfour-syllable inflected forms are also as a rule treated like single words for 5 These judgments are based on the data cited in Ringen and Hein¨ m¨ ki 1999 and V¨ limaa- a a aBlum 1999, as well as on a corpus of words occurring in the 1987 issues of the magazine SuomenKuvalehti, approximately 1,3 million words. The corpus is available on the University of HelsinkiLanguage Corpus Server, Department of General Linguistics, University of Helsinki. 6 The idea is traditional, though I am not sure who originated it. For discussion see e.g.Kiparsky 1993, and most recently Ringen and Hein¨ m¨ ki 1999 and V¨ limaa-Blum 1999. a a a
  8. 8. 116 / PAUL K IPARSKYpurposes of vowel harmony.7 (12) Stem-final rhythmic stress never initiates a vowel harmony domain /paperi-i-ssa/ p´ per` issa a e *p´ per` iss¨ a e a ‘paper’ (Iness.Pl.) /kaveri-lla/ k´ ver`lla a ı *k´ ver`ll¨ a ı a ‘guy’ (Adess.Sg.)Secondly, polysyllabic words which are transparently composed of a stemplus a derivational suffix (such as -iitti ‘-ite’, -iivi ‘-ive’, and especiallythe suffix -isti ‘-ist’, which is productive in Finnish) are unlikely quasi-compounds for morphological reasons, even though they have a lexical sec-ondary stress. They too are almost always treated as single words for purposesof vowel harmony: (13) Lexical suffix stress very seldom initiates a vowel harmony domain a. v´ kat`ivi-lla o ı ?*n´ minat`ivi-ll¨ o ı a ‘vocative’ (Adess.Sg.) b. ate`sti-lla ´ ı ?*´ te`sti-ll¨ a ı a ‘atheist’ (Adess.Sg.) c. k´ pital`sti-lla a ı ?*k´ pital`sti-ll¨ a ı a ‘capitalist’ (Adess.Sg.) d. h´ itar`sti-lla a ı *h´ itar`sti-ll¨ a ı a ‘accordionist’ (Adess.Sg.)If the form is built on a free stem, as (13d) h´ itar`sti from haitari ‘accor- a ıdion’, front harmony is totally out of the question. The explanation is that thequasi-compound analysis *haita-risti-ll¨ is so obviously contraindicated by athe morphology. In sum: variation in vowel harmony shows that stems with fixed stress canbe treated like compounds to the extent that they otherwise look like them inthe stem-level phonological representation. Their output phonological shapeis not what counts. This provides an independent argument for lexical sec-ondary stress.3 Segmental alternations3.1 Stop Deletion and Consonant GradationThe distribution of stops. Two central morphophonological processes gov-ern the distribution of its single stops p,t,k and geminated stops pp,tt,kk. They ˚are stated in informal processual terms in (14) (where V represents an un-stressed vowel). (14) a. S TOP D ELETION: t → ∅ / V V ˚ tt,pp,kk → t,p,k b. C ONSONANT G RADATION: / [+son] VC t,p,k → d,v,∅Stop Deletion (called t-Deletion in Keyser Kiparsky 1984) deletes singleintervocalic stops after a light unstressed syllable. Consonant Gradation re- 7 For a possible special case, see fn. 22 below.
  9. 9. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 117duces geminate voiceless stops to single voiceless stops, and single voicelessstops to voiced stops (under certain conditions to voiced fricatives and tozero) when a vowel or sonorant consonant precedes and a branching (VC)rhyme follows. (Here I will only be considering the degemination branch ofthe Consonant Gradation process.) For example, affixes of the form -CCVand -C regularly trigger Consonant Gradation under these conditions. (15) il-lustrates the operation of Stop Deletion and Consonant Gradation with formsfrom the declensional paradigm of lakko ‘strike’.8 (15) a. /lakko/ lak.ko Nom.Sg. b. /lakko-na/ lak.ko.na Ess.Sg. c. /lakko-ta/ lak.ko.a Prt.Sg. (Stop Del.) d. /lakko-i-ta/ lak.ko.ja Prt.Pl. (Stop Del., G.F.) e. /lakko-n/ la.kon Gen.Sg. (Cons.Grad.) f. /lakko-ssa/ la.kos.sa Iness.Sg. (Cons.Grad.) Both processes apply almost without exception in derived environments.9But, as Anttila 1994 notes, the processes also characterize the structure ofnative stems: even in underived environments, violations are practically con-fined to unassimilated loans and names, such as: (16) a. Stem-internal exceptions to Stop Deletion: senorita, vibrato, in- kognito, Kimito b. Stem-internal exceptions to Consonant Gradation: pikkelsi ‘pickle’, okkulttinen ‘occult’, opportunismi ‘opportunism’, appelsiini ‘orange’, rottinki ‘rattan’The distribution of stops in stems shows that the constraint behind Stop Dele-tion applies also to p and k. Although actual alternations only involve /t/, ˚ ˚ ˚sequences of the form [VkV] and [VpV], like [VtV], are essentially restrictedto unassimilated loanwords and names such as (17a). Most loanwords accom-modate to the constraint, and they do so by geminating the obstruent, not bydeleting it, as the examples in (17b) illustrate.10 8 Examples are cited in Finnish orthography, with stress and syllabification added where nec-essary. Syllables ending in short vowels (-V) are light, syllables ending in -VC, -VV, -VVC areheavy. The vowel sequences ei, ai, yi, oi, ai, ui, oi, au, ou, eu, iu, ey, ay, oy, ie, y¨ , uo, iy are ¨ ¨ ¨ ¨ odiphthongs. Other vowel sequences, such as ia, ua, ea, oa, are disyllabic. 9 There is no Consonant Gradation before the ending -is, because this ending imposestemplatic expressive gemination, superseding the Consonant Gradation constraint, e.g. julkkis‘celebrity, public figure’, from julkinen ‘public’. A systematic class of exceptions to ConsonantGradation are certain stems in /-s(e)/, which furnish the oblique stems of words whose nomina-tive ends in -nen, e.g. Kekkonen, Prt.Sg. Kekkos-ta. 10 Presumably in order to minimize the difference between the Finnish and original pronunci-ations. A related gemination process applies in Fenno-Swedish (Kiparsky, to appear).
  10. 10. 118 / PAUL K IPARSKY (17) a. judoka ‘judo practitioner’, paprika ‘bell pepper, paprika’, karak- teristika ‘characteristic’ (in mathematics), rokokoo ‘rococo’, Aleko, Alepa, heteka ‘a type of bed’ b. profeetta ‘prophet’, mammutti ‘mammoth’, apotti ‘abbot’, Eu- rooppa ‘Europe’, sinappi ‘mustard’ ˚Stop Deletion, then, reflects a broad distributional restriction on V[p,t,k]Vsequences, although, because no suffixes begin with a single /p/ or /k/, thealternations it governs all happen to be of the form /t/ ∼ ∅. This said, I willcontinue to use the term Stop Deletion to refer to its processual effects.Examples. Numerous stems and endings alternate in accord with Stop Dele-tion and/or Consonant Gradation (CG), often interacting with other process,as the examples in (18)-(22) illustrate for a variety of inflectional and deriva-tional suffixes.11 (18) Partitive Singular /-ta/ a. /puu-ta/ puu.ta ‘tree’ b. /voi-ta/ voi.ta ‘butter’ c. /si-t¨ / a si.t¨ a ‘that’ d. /palttoo-ta/ palt.too.ta ‘overcoat’ e. /puku-ta/ pu.ku.a ‘suit’ (Stop Del.) f. /katiska-ta/ ka.tis.kaa ‘fish trap’ (Stop Del., V-Contr.) (19) Partitive Plural /-i-ta/ a. /puu-i-ta/ pui.ta ‘trees’ b. /he-i-t¨ / a hei.t¨ a ‘them’ c. /palttoo-i-ta/ palt.toi.ta ‘overcoats’ d. /puku-i-ta/ pu.ku.ja ‘suits’ (Stop Del., G.F.) e. /katiska-i-ta/ ka.tis.ko.ja ‘fish traps’ (Stop Del., G.F.) (20) Genitive Plural /-i-ten/ a. /puu-i-ten/ pui.den ‘trees’ (Cons.Grad.) b. /voi-i-ten/ voi.den ‘butter’ (Cons.Grad.) c. /nuo-i-ten/ noi.den ‘those’ (Cons.Grad.) d. /palttoo-i-ten/ palt.toi.den ‘overcoats’ (Cons.Grad.) e. /puku-i-ten/ pu.ku.jen ‘suits’ (Stop Del., G.F.) f. /katiska-i-ten/ ka.tis.ko.jen ‘fish traps’ (Stop Del., G.F.) (21) Infinitive /taC/ 11 For simplicity I incorporate vowel harmony into the underlying representations.
  11. 11. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 119 a. /nouse-taC/ nous.taC ‘rise’ (Cons.Grad.) b. /tuo-taC/ tuo.daC ‘bring’ (Cons.Grad.) c. /hakk-at-taC/ ha.ka.taC ‘to chop’ (Cons.Grad.) d. /tule-taC/ tul.laC ‘to come’ (Cons.Grad., Assim.) e. /mene-t¨ C/ a men.n¨ C a ‘to go’ (Cons.Grad., Assim.) f. /laula-taC/ lau.laaC ‘to sing’ (Stop Del., V-Contr.) (22) Verbalizer /-at/ a. /hakk-at-kaa/ ha.kat.kaa ‘chop!’ (2Pl.) (Cons.Grad.) b. /hakk-at-taC/ ha.ka.taC ‘chop’ (Inf.) (Cons.Grad., twice) c. /hakk-at-a/ hak.kaa ‘chops’ (3Sg.) (Stop Del., V-Contr.) d. /hakk-at-u/ hak.kuu ‘chopping’ (N.) (Stop Del., V-Contr.)The ghost consonant. A comment is in order about the final /-C/ in (21) and(22b), an underlying consonantal element with no segmental melody of itsown. The evidence for this “ghost” segment is extensive, but a few of the mainpoints may be summarized here. First, it regularly triggers Consonant Grada-tion, e.g. /liikkeC/ liike ‘movement, shop’ (see also (21b-e), (22b)). Secondly,it blocks the regular raising of word-final e to i, e.g. Nom.Sg. /kuore/ kuori‘rind’, but /liikkeC/ liike, not *liiki or *liikki. Third, it blocks Stop Deletion,e.g. Prt.Sg. /liikkeC-t¨ / liikett¨ , not *liikke¨ . Fourth, it triggers stem-final - a a ae epenthesis before all -CCV and -C endings, as well as a subset of -CVendings, e.g. Iness.Sg. /liikkeC-ss¨ / liikkeess¨ , Gen.Sg. /liikkeC-n/ liikkeen, a aEss.Sg. /liikkeC-n¨ / liikkeen¨ .12 Fifth, when the next segment is a consonant, a athe -C materializes as a copy of it. This happens before those -CV endingswhich retain the unepenthesized -C stem,13 as in Prt.Sg. /liikkeC-t¨ / liikett¨ a aas well as before clitics such as -ko/-k¨ (e.g. liike[kk]¨ ‘the shop?’), in com- o opounds (e.g. liike[kk]atu ‘shopping street’), and in external sandhi as longas there is close contact between the words (e.g. liike[mm]enestyi ‘the shopflourished’). The examples in (23) show how words ending in /-C/ contrastwith words ending in vowels. (23) a. /ei se tuo-tta-C voi-ta/ ei se tuota[v v]oita ‘it does not produce butter’ b. /ei se tuo-ta voitta-C/ ei se tuota voita ‘it won’t beat THAT ONE’ c. /ei se voitta-C tuo-ta/ ei se voita[t t]uota ‘it won’t beat that one’ d. /ei se voi-ta tuo-tta-C/ ei se voita tuota ‘it does not produce BUTTER’ 12 Ultimately, the -e is probably part of the underlying form, for the empirical reasons pre-sented in in Keyser Kiparsky 1984. Thus, the “ghost consonant” is really a “ghost syllable”,in conformity with the constraint that all Finnish stems end in vowels (the Stem Constraint mo-tivated in section 5). 13 Or, if we adopt the analysis of fn. 12, before those -CV endings which allow stem-final -e tobe deleted.
  12. 12. 120 / PAUL K IPARSKY3.2 Optionality and complementarityMovable polysyllabic stems. A stem-final vowel combines with the plu-ral suffix /i/ into a diphthong.14 After underlying diphthongs, Stop Deletionis always blocked: e.g. lauantai-ta ‘Saturday’ (Prt.Sg.). After morphologi-cally derived diphthongs, stops are optionally deleted in a subclass of poly-syllabic stems, and the second half of the diphthong becomes an onset, tak-ing the place of the deleted stop. This is exactly the class of stems we havealready identified through their stress and vowel harmony behavior as MOV-ABLE POLYSYLLABLES . (24) Diphthongs optionally trigger Stop Deletion in movable polysyllables: a. /korjaamo-i-ta/ k´ r.jaa.m` .ja o o ‘repair shops’ (Prt.Pl.) k´ r.jaa.m` i.ta o o b. /kalevala-i-ta/ K´ .le.v` .lo.ja a a ‘Kalevalas’ (Prt.Pl.) K´ .le.va.l` i.ta a o c. /professori-i-ta/ pr´ .fes.s` .re.ja15 o o ‘professors’ (Prt.Pl.) pr´ .fes.so.r` i.ta o e d. /artikkeli-i-ta/ ar.tik.k` .le.ja ´ e ‘articles’ (Prt.Pl.) ar.tik.ke.l` i.ta ´ e(In this section I mark primary and secondary word stress, for reasons whichwill soon become apparent.) In movable polysyllables, the diphthong formed by combining the stem-final vowel with the plural suffix /i/ has another unexpected property. It op-tionally triggers Consonant Gradation of its onset stop, as in the essive andillative plurals in (25). (25) Diphthongs optionally trigger Consonant Gradation in movable poly- syllables: a. /ullakko-i-na/ ul.lak.k` i.na ´ o ‘attic’ (Ess.Pl.) ul.la.k` i.na ´ o b. /ullakko-i-hin/ ul.lak.k` i.hin ´ o ‘attic’ (Ill.Pl.) ul.la.k` i.hin ´ o ´ d. /amerikka-i-na/ A.me.r`k.koi.na ‘America’ (Ess.Pl.) ı ´ A.me.ri.k` i.na o ´ e. /amerikka-i-hin/ A.me.r`k.koi.hin ‘America’ (Ill.Pl.) ı ´ A.me.ri.k` i.hin o 14 Under certain conditions the stem-final vowel is deleted instead, e.g. /matala-i-ta/ matalia‘low’ (Prt.Sg.); see Anttila 1997. 15 Note the lowering of /-i/ to -e in (24c,d). When Stop Deletion applies in the genitive plural,stem-final /-i/ and /-e/ instead appear as /-i/, and the glide is absorbed, e.g. /professori-i-ten/professorien ∼ professoreiden.
  13. 13. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 121 In contrast, Consonant Gradation never applies before a derived diphthongin the second syllable of disyllabic stems. (26) Diphthongs do not trigger Consonant Gradation in disyllabic stems: a. /lakko-i-na/ l´ k.koi.na *l´ .koi.na ‘strike’ (Ess.Pl.) a a b. /lakko-i-hin/ l´ k.koi.hin *l´ .koi.hin ‘strike’ (Ill.Pl.) a aWhen the diphthong is followed by a tautosyllabic consonant, as in (27a-c),Consonant Gradation is obligatory regardless of the syllable count. And, ofcourse, Consonant Gradation is obligatory before a simple VC rhyme, what-ever the length of the stem, e.g. (27d). (27) Obligatory Consonant Gradation: a. l´ .koi.ssa a *l´ k.koi.ssa a ‘strike’ (Ins.Pl.) ´ o ´ b. A.me.ri.k` is.sa *A.me.r`k.kois.sa ı ‘America’ (Ins.Pl.) c. ulla.k` is.sa ´ o *´ llak.k` is.sa u o ‘attic’ (Ins.Pl.) d. ulla.k` s.sa ´ o *´ llak.k` s.sa u o ‘attic’ (Ins.Sg.) The problem, then, is why the systematic variation in (24) and (25) occurs,and why precisely with diphthongs in a subclass of polysyllabic stems.Fixed polysyllabic stems. F IXED POLYSYLLABLES do not show variationin either Consonant Gradation or Stop Deletion (cf. Anttila 1997:20). (28) Diphthongs trigger Stop Deletion in fixed polysyllables: a. k´ .ra.m` l.le.ja *k´ .ra.m` l.lei.ta a e a e ‘candy’ (Prt.Pl.) b. k´ .ra.m` l.li.en *k´ .ra.m` l.lei.den ‘candy’ (Gen.Pl.) a e a e ´ c. A.la.b` .mo.ja a ´ *A.la.ba.m` i.ta o ‘Alabama’ (Prt.Pl.) ´ a ´ d. A.la.b` .mo.jen *A.la.ba.m` i.den o ‘Alabama’ (Gen.Pl.) (29) Diphthongs do not trigger Consonant Gradation in fixed polysyllables: a. p´ ls.ter.n` k.koi.na *p´ ls.ter.n` .koi.na ‘parsnips’ (Ess.Pl.) a a a a b. p´ ls.ter.n` k.koi.hin *p´ ls.ter.n` .koi.hin ‘parsnips’ (Ill.Pl.) a a a a c. b´ l.ˇe.v`k.kei.na o s ı *b´ l.ˇe.v`k.ei.na o s ı ‘bolsheviks’ (Ess.Pl.) d. b´ l.ˇe.v`.kei.hin o s ı *b´ l.ˇe.v`.kei.hin o s ı ‘bolsheviks’ (Ill.Pl.) In fact, fixed polysyllabic stems pattern just like disyllabic stems; compare(28) and (29) with (30): (30) a. /sama-i-ta/ s´ .mo.ja a *s´ .moi.ta a ‘same’ (Prt.Pl.) b. /sama-i-ten/ s´ .mo.jen a *s´ .moi.den a ‘same’ (Gen.Pl.) c. /lakko-i-na/ l´ k.koi.na a *l´ .koi.na a ‘strike’ (Ess.Pl.) d. /lakko-i-hin/ l´ k.koi.hin a *l´ .koi.hin a ‘strike’ (Ill.Pl.) So we have a second mystery compounding the first: why do stems of fouror more syllables stems fall into two different types, movable (patterning liketrisyllables) and fixed (patterning like disyllables)?
  14. 14. 122 / PAUL K IPARSKYComplementarity of Stop Deletion and Consonant Gradation. The twoalternations of Stop Deletion and Consonant Gradation are strictly COMPLE -MENTARY: when the conditions for both are present, one or the other mustapply, but both may not. Thus, when a movable potentially gradating stem iscombined with a suffix in -t, there are always only two forms, never four: (31) Complementarity of Stop Deletion and Consonant Gradation: a. /ullakko-i-ta/ ul.lak.k` .ja ´ o ul.la.k` i.ta ´ o *´ l.lak.k` i.ta u o *´ l.la.k` .ja u o ´ b. /amerikka-i-ten/ A.me.r`k.ko.jen ı ´ A.me.ri.k` i.den o ´ ´ *A.me.r`k.koi.den *A.me.r`.ko.jen ı ıAnd when a fixed potentially gradating stem, such as papiljotti, is combinedwith a suffix in -t, there is always only one form, never two. (32) /papiljotti-i-ta/ p´ pilj` tteja *p´ pilj` teita a o a o ‘hair curlers’ (Prt.Pl.) *p´ pilj` teja *p´ piljot` ita a o a eThis is remarkable considering that each process on its own is optional (e.g.ullakoina ∼ ullakkoina, korjaamoja ∼ korjaamoita). So we have two more mysteries: when both Stop Deletion and ConsonantGradation are applicable, why must at least one of them take effect? And whydo both of them never take effect together?3.3 Another systematically opaque contextDiphthong shortening. As already stated, long vowels trigger neither Con-sonant Gradation before them (see (33)), nor Stop Deletion after them (see(34)). (33) a. /palttoo-ssa/ palt.toos.sa *pal.toos.sa ‘overcoat’ (Ins.Sg.) b. /hakkatV-u-n/ hak.kuun *ha.kuun ‘chopping’ (Gen.Sg.) c. /rakkasV-lla/ rak.kaal.la *ra.kaal.la ‘dear’ (Ads.Sg.) (34) a. /palttoo-ta/ palt.too.ta *palt.too.a ‘overcoat’ (Prt.Sg.) b. /hakkatV-u-ta/ hak.kuu.ta *hak.kuu.a ‘chopping’ (Prt.Sg.) c. /suklaa-ta/ suk.laa.ta *suk.laa.a ‘chocolate’ (Prt.Sg.)Superheavy (three-mora) diphthongs are categorically excluded in Finnish,and when they arise in the morphology they are always shortened, as whenthe plural /-i/ is added to /-VV/ stems: (35) a. /puu-i-ssa/ puis.sa *puuis.sa ‘tree’ (Ins.Pl.) b. /voi-i-ssa/ vois.sa *voiis.sa ‘butter’ (Ins.Pl.) c. /suklaa-i-ssa/ suk.lais.sa *suk.laais.sa ‘chocolate’ (Ins.Pl.)The behavior of shortened diphthongs. The shortened diphthongs are pro-nounced like original short diphthongs. Still, a following tautosyllabic con-sonant triggers no Consonant Gradation before them, and a following single
  15. 15. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 123stop does not undergo Stop Deletion after them. (36) a. /palttoo-i-ssa/ palt.tois.sa *pal.tois.sa ‘overcoats’ (Ins.Pl.) b. /hakkat-u-i-ssa/ hak.kuis.sa *ha.kuis.sa ‘choppings’ (Ins.Pl.) c. /rakkasV-i-lla/ rak.kail.la *ra.kail.la ‘dear’ (Ad.Pl.) (37) a. /palttoo-i-ta/ palt.toi.ta *pal.toi.ta ‘overcoats’ (Prt.Pl.) b. /hakkat-u-i-ta/ hak.kui.ta *ha.kui.ta ‘choppings’ (Prt.Pl.) c. /rakkasV-i-ta/ rak.kai.ta *ra.kai.ta ‘dear’ (Prt.Pl.)This contrasts with ordinary diphthongs formed with a short vowel plus aplural i. For example, the retained geminates in (36) are in exactly the sameoutput environments as the degeminated ones in (38), and the retained stopsin (37) are in exactly the same output environments as the deleted stops in(39) . (38) a. /taltta-i-ssa/ tal.tois.sa *tal.ttois.sa ‘chisels’ (Ins.Pl.) b. /akku-i-ssa/ a.kuis.sa *ak.kuis.sa ‘batteries’ (Ins.Pl.) c. /lakko-i-lla/ la.koil.la *lak.koil.la ‘strikes’ (Ad.Pl.) (39) a. /taltta-i-ta/ tal.tto.ja *talt.toi.ta ‘chisels’ (Prt.Pl.) b. /akku-i-ta/ a.kku.ja *ak.kui.ta ‘batteries’ (Prt.Pl.) c. /lakko-i-ta/ la.ko.ja *lak.koi.ta ‘strikes’ (Prt.Pl.)This gives mystery number five: why are Stop Deletion and Consonant Gra-dation opaquely conditioned? Why do shortened diphthongs block these pro-cesses, in contexts phonetically indistinguishable from those that otherwisetrigger them?A stratal OT solution. We concluded first that polysyllabic stems in Finnishfall into two subclasses, fixed stems such as palsternakka, and movable stemssuch as Amerikka. Fixed polysyllables always keep their secondary stress onthat syllable. Movable polysyllables receive a rhythmic secondary stress onthe third or fourth syllable, depending on syllable weight in accord with the `LH effect. Now we have seen that the two types of polysyllables differ withrespect to two other core processes of the stem phonology: Stop Deletion andConsonant Gradation. Fixed stems display no optionality with respect to theseprocesses, whereas movable stems show systematic optionality with respectto both. The analysis proposed here is that fixed polysyllables differ from movablepolysyllables in having an obligatory fixed secondary stress at the stem level.All the differences between the two types of polysyllables follow from thisbasic stress difference. Some of them are conditioned by stress directly, oth-ers indirectly via syllable structure. The key point is that rhythmic secondarystress by (6) is assigned optionally (subject to certain weight constraints) inthe stem phonology, and obligatorily (regardless of syllable weight) in the
  16. 16. 124 / PAUL K IPARSKYword phonology. Stop Deletion and Consonant Gradation are conditioned bystem-level stress and by stem-level syllable structure. In the output, stem-levelstresses and stem-level syllabification are masked by word-level rhythmicstress and resyllabification, which are irrelevant to Stop Deletion and Conso-nant Gradation. These conclusions translate directly into evidence for stratalOT and against parallelism, for the separation between stem-level and wordphonology on which the analysis depends is not available in fully parallel OT. In sum, word-initial stress and fixed medial stress always assigned at thestem level, while movable medial stress may be assigned either at the stemlevel or at the word level. It would be desirable to base this generalizationon some principle (rather than simply on the data of the language). Distinc-tiveness is irrelevant: initial primary stress, visible in the stem phonology, isas predictable as rhythmic secondary stress, which is not. One reason whyinitial main stress is obligatorily assigned in the stem phonology may bethat prosodic phonology requires a word to consist of at least a foot, whichis its prosodic head (peak). This is a very common and perhaps universalprosodic licensing requirement. On the other hand, many languages (for ex-ample, Cairene Arabic) reportedly do not require that words be parsed intobinary feet by secondary stresses ( “conflation”, Hayes 1995:119). The optionlies precisely in whether Finnish imposes this requirement at the stem level, ornot. Formally, the variation results from free ranking in the stem phonology ofthe constraint that prohibits secondary stress with a constraint demanding al-ternating stress. For present purposes, let us assume that the constraint againstsecondary stress is simply *S TRESS (for more sophisticated alternatives, seeCrowhurst 1996 and de Lacy 1998). The antagonistic constraint that forcesa full metrical parse of the word is presumably *L APSE (or L ICENSE - , inconcert with undominated F OOT-B IN). In the word phonology, the ranking isfixed so that alternating rhythmic stress is obligatory. Additional differences between the stem phonology and the word phonol-ogy will emerge as we go on to develop the constraint system behind thesedescriptive generalizations.3.4 Stress and syllable structureStress-to-Weight. In the stem phonology, S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT (“stressedsyllables are heavy”) dominates the constraints that assign alternating sec-ondary stress. They are themselves dominated by the constraint that requiresthe word-initial syllable to bear primary stress. They are also dominated by*C LASH and by the Faithfulness constraint M AX(Stress). (40) *C LASH, L EFT- HEADEDNESS, A LIGN -L EFT, M AX(Stress) S TRESS - TO -W EIGHTThe ranking in (40) has important corollaries, to which I now turn.
  17. 17. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 125 The dominant status of S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT precludes light syllablesfrom getting rhythmic stress in the stem phonology (except in initial position,where A LIGN -L EFT forces it). Being always word-level, the rhythmic stressof light syllables is invisible to stem phonology, and so cannot block StopDeletion. That is why Stop Deletion is obligatory after short vowels even ifthey bear rhythmic secondary stress:16 (41) a. /paperi-ta/ paperia *paperita ‘paper’ (Prt.Sg.) b. /ullakko-ta/ ullakkoa *ullakkota ‘attic’ (Prt.Sg.) c. /salama-ta/ salamaa *salamata ‘lightning’ (Prt.Sg.) When a stem-final short vowel is combined with the plural marker -i, adiphthong results, which is eligible to bear stress. Optional assignment ofrhythmic stress in the stem-level phonology then generates the systematicalternation treated above, and illustrated again in (42), where the optionalStop Deletion reflects the stress option. (42) /ullakko-i-ta/ ullakkoja ullakoita ‘attic’ (Prt.Pl.) We have now uncovered yet another difference between lexical and rhyth-mic secondary stress. Rhythmic stress is assigned in the stem phonology onlyto heavy syllables, because of high-ranking S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT. Lexicalstress, however, can be lexically marked on light syllables as well, as in (10a),in consequence of the ranking M AX(Stress) S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT.17W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS and the structure of nuclei. As for the complemen-tary constraint W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS, its high rank in the stem-level phonol-ogy excludes unstressed long nuclei in the stem phonology. Somewhat shock-ingly, it turns out that apparent unstressed diphthongs in Finnish are phono-logically monomoraic, and apparent unstressed long vowels are phonologi-cally disyllabic sequences. This is the key to understanding the complemen-tarity between Stop Deletion and Consonant Gradation. Recall that the output of /mellakka-i-ta/ is either mellakkoja, with StopDeletion, or mellakoita, with Consonant Gradation, but not *mellakoja or*mellakkoita. When both processes have scope, one of them must apply, butboth cannot apply together — even in environments where each is otherwiseoptional. The reason is that both processes are obligatory, but require incom-patible structural conditions, whose presence is itself subject to variation. The 16 The statement in the text holds strictly for contemporary standard Finnish. In certain dialectsand sometimes in the standard language of the 19th century and earlier, -t is retained after poly-syllabic stems in /-a/ and /-¨ /, e.g. salamata, but not *paperita, *ullakkota. Since a, a are the a ¨most sonorous of the vowels, this dialectal variation adds support for our analysis which ties theblocking of Stop Deletion to stem-level stress controlled by S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT. 17 Of course, light final syllables cannot have lexical stress because N ON -F INAL is undomi-nated, so that no monomoraic feet are permitted anywhere in Finnish.
  18. 18. 126 / PAUL K IPARSKYparameter of variation was identified in Wiik 1967 as the syllabification ofthe stem-final diphthong, which (in line with the phonological theory of thetime) he represented as oi and oj, respectively. In Keyser Kiparsky 1984these alternative syllabifications were analyzed in terms of rhyme structure,itself derived from the independently motivated variation in secondary stressdescribed above. Specifically, we argued that stressed diphthongs (Wiik’s oi)have two moras, while unstressed diphthongs (Wiik’s oj) have one mora, andwe showed that this structural difference explains the incidence of ConsonantGradation and Stop Deletion. Monosyllabic and disyllabic stems exhibit no variation because their stresspattern is fixed. The initial (or only) syllable of a word always bears mainstress, so a diphthong in the first syllable of a word is always bimoraic. Be-cause of *C LASH, the second syllable is always unstressed, so a diphthong inthe second syllable is always monomoraic. This determines the shape of boththe onset and of the following desinence. As stated in (14), Consonant Grada-tion takes place before branching (VC) rhymes, and Stop Deletion takes placeafter light unstressed syllables. An unstressed diphthong, forming a simplerhyme, does not trigger Consonant Gradation by itself (see (43a,b,e,f)). Ofcourse, if it is followed in the rhyme by a consonant which closes the sylla-ble, Consonant Gradation takes place (see (43c,d,g,h)). By the same token, anunstressed diphthong obligatorily triggers Stop Deletion (see (43i,j)): (43) a. /lakko-i-na/ l´ k.koi.na a (No C.G.) ‘strikes’ (Ess.Pl.) b. /lakko-i-hin/ l´ k.koi.hin a (No C.G.) ‘strikes’ (Ill.Pl.) c. /lakko-i-n/ l´ .koin a (C.G.) ‘strikes’ (Instr.Pl.) d. /lakko-i-ssa/ l´ .kois.sa a (C.G.) ‘strikes’ (Iness.Pl.) e. /sattu-i/ s´ t.tui a (No C.G.) ‘happened’ (3.Sg.) f. /sattu-i-vat/ s´ t.tui.vat a (No C.G.) ‘happened’ (3.Pl.) g. /sattu-i-t/ s´ .tuit a (C.G.) ‘happened’ (2.Sg.) h. /sattu-i-mme/ s´ .tuim.me a (C.G.) ‘happened’ (1.Pl.) i. /lakko-i-ta/ l´ k.ko.ja a (Stop Del.) ‘strikes’ (Prt.Pl.) j. /lakko-i-ten/ l´ k.ko.jen a (Stop Del.) ‘strikes’ (Gen.Pl.) The behavior of polysyllabic stems is also predicted. Polysyllabic stemswith fixed lexical stress on the penult syllable function exactly like disyllabicstems with respect to Consonant Gradation and Stop Deletion, as was alreadydocumented in (28) and (29). Polysyllabic stems of the movable type have aone-mora or two-mora final diphthong in the stem phonology, depending onwhether rhythmic stress is assigned in the stem phonology or not, an optionwhich yields the respective structures in (44). (44) a. Stressed diphthong, two moras: m´ l.la.k[` µ iµ ]- e o b. Unstressed diphthong, one mora: m´ l.lak.k[oi]µ- e
  19. 19. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 127On the stress option (44a), diphthongs trigger Consonant Gradation (e.g.Prt.Pl. m´ llak` ita). On the no-stress option (44b) they trigger Stop Deletion e o(e.g. Prt.Pl. m´ llakk` ja). Since these are the only two options, one of the e otwo processes must apply: the reason there are not two more partitive plu-rals (*m´ llakk` ita, *m´ llak` ja) is that stress obligatorily determines syllable e o e ostructure and the syllabic conditions on Consonant Gradation and i-Deletionare mutually incompatible. Both their apparent optionality, and their comple-mentarity, are thus explained. To complete the story, it remains to show how exactly W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS governs syllable structure, and to generalize the analysis from diph-thongs to long vowels.Deriving the syllable structure of diphthongs and long vowels. The gen-eralization that stressed noninitial diphthongs in Finnish have two moras andunstressed diphthongs have one mora in the stem phonology is a consequenceof a constraint which prohibits unstressed bimoraic nuclei, a special case ofW EIGHT- TO -S TRESS.
  20. 20. 128 / PAUL K IPARSKY (45) W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS *Nucw (where Nucw denotes an unstressed syllable nucleus)The stem-level prohibition of unstressed two-mora nuclei is enforced for longvowels as well. However, there it is implemented in a different way. Whereasunstressed diphthongs are compressed into short nuclei, long vowels are ex-panded into two syllables.18 (46) The implementation of W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS a. Unstressed diphthongs Stressed diphthongs | | | o i o i b. Unstressed long vowels Stressed long vowels | | a a Why are unstressed diphthongs accommodated to (45) by becoming mono-moraic, whereas unstressed long vowels are accommodated to (45) by be-coming disyllabic? Because the bimoraicity of long vowels is distinctive,being the defining property of length itself. A “monomoraic long vowel” is acontradiction in terms. Bimoraicity is not a defining property of diphthongs,however. In most languages diphthongs are redundantly bimoraic, and somelanguages have “monomoraic diphthongs”, short vocalic nuclei affiliated with ´two melodies, e.g. English (Harris 1994:278), Icelandic (Arnason 1992), andGere (Paradis 1997:532). Therefore, the constraint M AX-V, which pos-tulates that an input vocalic mora must be have an output correspondent,prevents long vowels and long diphthongs from shortening, but it does not 18 The splitting of long vowels into two syllables under the compulsion of metrical constraintsis familiar from Southern Paiute and other languages.
  21. 21. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 129prevent regular diphthongs from being realized as monomoraic. This is thedesired outcome. In sum: in the stem-level syllabification of Finnish, all unstressed diph-thongs are monomoraic, and all stressed diphthongs are bimoraic, in satisfac-tion of W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS and S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT. These constraintsare however dominated by M AX-V. The only way unstressed long vowelscan satisfy W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS without violating M AX-V is by being splitinto two short syllables, even though this incurs an O NSET violation. Diph-thongs, on the other hand, can be reconciled with the constraints simply bybeing assigned one mora rather than two.19 Thus, the structure of unstressed syllables is given by the three constraintsin (47), where (47a,b) (47c).20 (47) a. W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS A heavy nucleus must be stressed. b. M AX-V An input vocalic mora must be realized in the output. c. O NSET A syllable must have an onset. Unstressed diphthongs, long vowels, and long diphthongs (the latter twospecified as bimoraic in the input), are respectively syllabified as in (48). 19 Note that the diphthongs we are concerned here are derived from a stem-final vowel plusthe plural affix -i-. Diphthongs formed by stem-final vowels plus the past tense affix -i-, andunderlying diphthongs, behave differently, as we will see below. 20 The pairs of representations (a) and (b) (where α is a set of features defining a segment) areassumed to be indistinguishable (OCP):(a) and | V W (b) and | | α αα α α α
  22. 22. 130 / PAUL K IPARSKY (48) Diphthongs: /oi/ W T- TO -S TR M AX-V O NSET a. w | C o i b. w * | | C o i c. | | * | | C o i Long vowels: /oo/ W T- TO -S TR M AX -V O NSET a. w | * | C o b. w * C o c. | | * C o
  23. 23. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 131 Long diphthongs: /ooi/ W T- TO -S TR M AX-V O NSET a. w | * C o i b. w * | | C o i c. | | * | | C o iConsonant Gradation reformulated. The above result has another imme-diate payoff. It explains all seemingly arbitrary properties of Consonant Gra-dation. The opaque conditioning in (36) and (38), which brings about sur-face contrasts such as palttoissa vs. taltoissa, is due to the fact that Conso-nant Gradation is defined on the stem-level syllabification. In the stem-levelsyllabification, unstressed long diphthongs form separate short nuclei, andconsequently do not trigger Consonant Gradation, even when followed by asyllable-closing consonant. For example, the cited examples are respectivelysyllabified as palt.to.ois.sa and tal.tois.sa at the stem level, so that the envi-ronment of Consonant Gradation is satisfied only in the latter. In fact, we can now clean up the right context of Consonant Gradationand remove the arbitrary stipulations from it. Instead of the previous messycontext (49a), we now have simply (49b). (49) a. Old formulation: In the onset of a syllable whose rhyme ends in a consonant, except if it has a long vowel or a shortened diphthong, or which consists of a diphthong with lexical stress, and optionally in the onset of a syllable whose rhyme consists of a diphthong with rhythmic stress. b. New formulation: In the onset of a heavy syllable.Defined at the stem level, (49b) captures the exact conditions under whichthe process applies. It is no longer necessary to exclude long vowels fromthe triggering environment of Consonant Gradation, or to list the contexts inwhich diphthongs trigger it. So simplified, Consonant Gradation (at least the degemination part of it)can be seen to be a special case of the quantititive dissimilation constraint*HH, which is proposed, and extensively motivated for Finnish, by Anttila
  24. 24. 132 / PAUL K IPARSKY1997.Stop Deletion reformulated. The context of Stop Deletion also becomessimpler and more natural. Instead of the messy formulation (50a) we canhave (50b). (50) a. Old formulation: Between an unstressed short vowel and a vowel, or between an unstressed underlying short diphthong and a vowel, and optionally between a short diphthong with rhythmic stress and a vowel. b. New formulation: (i) Between a short unstressed vowel and a vowel. (Or even: (ii) Between short unstressed vowels.)Further simplifications are probably possible. The reason the preceding vowelmust be short is that onsetless syllables are excluded after long syllables inFinnish stems (as Anttila points out). For example, Stop Deletion applies in/puku-ta/ pu.ku.a but not in /puu-ta/ puu.ta (see (18)) because pu.ku.a con-forms to the canonical shape of stems (e.g. saippua ‘soap’, pors.tu.a ‘porch’,while *puua is not a possible stem.3.5 Interim summaryThe analysis in outline. The distinction between stem stress and word stressis essential to understanding Finnish morphophonology. Initial main stressand fixed secondary stress are always visible in the stem-level phonology,while rhythmic secondary stress is optionally visible in the stem phonol-ogy, and then only on heavy syllables, because of high-ranking S TRESS -TO -W EIGHT . Optional rhythmic stress in the stem phonology results from `movable ranking of L ICENSE - . In addition to triggering the LH effect, theconstraints S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT and W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS cause unstresseddiphthongs to be parsed as single Vs, and unstressed long vowels to be parsedas disyllables. In the word phonology, rhythmic stress is obligatory because*L APSE dominates *S TRESS. Consonant Gradation (pp, tt, kk → p, t, k, and p, t, k → v, d, ∅) appliesin the onset of a heavy syllable. E.g. /lakko+n/ → la.kon, /m´ llakk` -i-na/ → e om´ l.la.k` i.na (oi is stressed, therefore bimoraic) but /l´ kko-i-na/ → l´ kkoina e o a a(oi is unstressed, therefore monomoraic by W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS, so grada-tion fails). Stop Deletion applies after a short unstressed nucleus. E.g. /lakko+ta/ →lakkoa. Prt.Pl. /m´ llakk` -i-ta/ → m´ l.la.k` i.ta (oi is stressed, so Stop Deletion e o e ofails) but /l´ kko-i-ta/ → lakkoja (oi is unstressed, and parsed into a single V aslot, so Stop Deletion applies). We derive the variability of Consonant Gradation and Stop Deletion fromthe optionality of secondary stress via syllable structure, and explain theircomplementarity by the fact that they require inconsistent syllable structures.
  25. 25. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 133 Functionally, lexical secondary stresses pattern with predictable word-initial primary stresses in being obligatorily visible in the stem phonologyand morphology. Rhythmic secondary stress stands apart in being optionallyvisible in the stem-level phonology and morphology, due to the free rankingof *L APSE and *S TRESS.Illustrative tableaux. (51) shows the invariant patterning of disyllabicwords and of fixed polysyllabic stems, on the (convenient but nonessen-tial) assumption that the latter have an underlying lexically marked stress.How the free ranking generates variation in movable polysyllables is seenin (52) and (53) (where the two freely ranked constraints are boldfaced).Keep in mind that (in observance of the constraints in (47), omitted from thetableaux), unstressed diphthongs are monomoraic and stressed diphthongsare bimoraic.
  26. 26. 134 / PAUL K IPARSKY (51) Derivation of lakkojen ‘strikes’ (Gen.Pl.) and almanakkojen ‘almanacs’ (Gen.Pl.) under the ranking *S TRESS *L APSE: M AX -S TRESS S TR - TO -W T C ONS G RAD A LL -F T-L M AX -S EG S TOP D EL *S TRESS A LIGN -L M AX -C *C LASH *L APSE U NI -P K Stem-Level Input: lakko-i-ten 1a. l´ k.k` i.den a o * ** * 1 1b. l´ .k` i.den a o * ** * 1 * 1c. l´ k.k` .jen a o * ** * 1 1d. l´ .k` .jen a o * ** * * 1 * 1e. l´ k.koi.den a * * 1f. l´ .koi.den a * * * * 1g. l´ k.ko.jen a * * 1h. l´ .ko.jen a * * * * Input: alman´ kka-i-ten a 2a. al.ma.n` k.koi.den ´ a ** * 2 2b. al.ma.n` .koi.den ´ a ** * * 2 * 2c. al.ma.n` k.ko.jen ´ a ** * 2 2d. al.ma.n` .ko.jen ´ a ** * * 2 * 2e. al.ma.n` k.k` i.den ´ a o * *** * 2,3 2f. al.ma.n` .k` i.den ´ a o * *** * 2,3 * 2g. al.ma.n` k.k` .jen ´ a o * *** * * 2,3 2h. al.ma.n` .k` .jen ´ a o * *** ** * 2,3 * 2i. al.ma.nak.koi.den ´ * * * * * 2j. al.ma.na.koi.den ´ * * * * * * 2k. al.ma.nak.ko.jen ´ * * * * * 2l. al.ma.na.ko.jen ´ * * * * * * 2m. al.ma.nak.k` i.den ´ o * ** * 3 2n. al.ma.na.k` i.den ´ o * ** 3 * 2o. al.ma.nak.k` .jen ´ o * ** * * 3 2p. al.ma.na.k` .jen ´ o * ** * * 3 * 2q. al.ma.n´ k.ko.jen a * ** * 2 2r. al.ma.n´ k.ko.jen ´ a * ** * 2In this case, the opposite ranking *L APSE *S TRESS would yield the sameresult. In other word types, the ranking of these constraints makes a differ-ence, as the next tableaux show.
  27. 27. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 135(52) Derivation of mellakkojen ‘riots’ (Gen.Pl.) and Amerikkojen ‘Ameri- cas’ (Gen.Pl.) under the ranking *S TRESS *L APSE: M AX -S TRESS S TR - TO -W T C ONS G RAD A LL -F T-L M AX -S EG S TOP D EL *S TRESS A LIGN -L M AX -C *C LASH *L APSE U NI -P KStem-levelInput: mellakka-i-ten3a. m´ l.lak.k` i.den e o ** * 23b. m´ l.la.k` i.den e o ** 2 *3c. m´ l.lak.k` .jen e o ** * * 23d. m´ l.la.k` .jen e o ** * * 2 *3e. m´ l.lak.koi.den e * * *3f. m´ l.la.koi.den e * * * *3g. m´ l.lak.ko.jen e * * *3h. m´ l.la.ko.jen e * * * *Input: amerikka-i-ten4a. a.me.rik.k` i.den ´ o ** * * 34b. a.me.ri.k` i.den ´ o ** * 3 *4c. a.me.r`k.koi.den ´ ı ** * * 24d. a.me.r`.koi.den ´ ı ** * ** 2 *4e. a.me.r`k.ko.jen ´ ı ** * * 24f. a.me.r`.ko.jen ´ ı ** ** * 2 *4g. a.me.rik.k` .jen ´ o ** ** 34h. a.me.ri.k` .jen ´ o ** ** * 3 *4i. a.me.rik.koi.den ´ * * * *4j. a.me.ri.koi.den ´ * * * * *4k. a.me.rik.ko.jen ´ * * * *4l. a.me.ri.ko.jen ´ * * * * *
  28. 28. 136 / PAUL K IPARSKY (53) Derivation of mellakoiden ‘riots’ (Gen.Pl.) and Amerikoiden ‘Ameri- cas’ (Gen.Pl.) under the ranking *L APSE *S TRESS: M AX -S TRESS S TR - TO -W T C ONS G RAD A LL -F T-L M AX -S EG S TOP D EL *S TRESS A LIGN -L M AX -C *C LASH *L APSE U NI -P K Stem-level Input: mellakka-i-ten 3a. m´ l.lak.k` i.den e o ** * 2 3b. m´ l.la.k` i.den e o ** 2 * 3c. m´ l.lak.k` .jen e o ** * * 2 3d. m´ l.la.k` .jen e o ** * * 2 * 3e. m´ l.lak.koi.den e * * * 3f. m´ l.la.koi.den e * * * * 3g. m´ l.lak.ko.jen e * * * 3h. m´ l.la.ko.jen e * * * * Input: amerikka-i-ten 4a. a.me.rik.k` i.den ´ o ** * * 3 4b. a.me.ri.k` i.den ´ o ** * 3 * 4c. a.me.r`k.koi.den ´ ı ** * * 2 4d. a.me.r`.koi.den ´ ı ** * ** 2 * 4e. a.me.r`k.ko.jen ´ ı ** * * 2 4f. a.me.r`.ko.jen ´ ı ** ** * 2 * 4g. a.me.rik.k` .jen ´ o ** ** 3 4h. a.me.ri.k` .jen ´ o ** ** * 3 * 4i. a.me.rik.koi.den ´ * * * ** 4j. a.me.ri.koi.den ´ * * * * * 4k. a.me.rik.ko.jen ´ * * * * 4l. a.me.ri.ko.jen ´ * * * * *Conclusion. The upshot is that the core alternations seen in Finnish inflec-tion are governed by phonological constraints relating to stress and syllablestructure. The data already show clearly that they are located specifically inthe stem phonology, but in the next section I add two pieces of evidence thatshould remove any lingering doubt on this score. The first is that stem-levelsecondary stress conditions what is unquestionably an allomorphic alterna-tion. The second is that it is sensitive to the morphological composition of theaffected diphthong.
  29. 29. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 1373.6 Morphological and lexical evidenceStress-conditioned illative allomorphy. The illative case ending displaysa distribution of allomorphs which independently confirms the above analy-sis of stress. There are two basic forms, the short form (the elsewhere allo-morph), and the long form. The short form is /-hVn/, with a variant /-Vn/ dueto phonological deletion of h after unstressed simple vowels. Chameleon-like,the short form’s V always matches the color of the preceding vowel. The longform is /-sVVn/, where V matches a preceding /i/, else is /e/. This distributionis illustrated by the Illative Singular forms in (54). (54) Short form of the Illative: -hVn, -Vn a. maa-han ‘land’, puu-hun ‘tree’, tee-hen ‘tea’, tie-hen ‘road’, hai-hin ‘shark’ b. mi-hin ‘into what’, t¨ -h¨ n ‘into this’ a a c. sama-an ‘same’, latu-un ‘ski trail’, talo-on ‘house’, salama-an ‘lightning’, ullakko-on ‘attic’, Amerikka-an ‘America’The long form of the illative appears after “contracted stems”, that is, stemswhose output form ends in a long unstressed vowel, which as shown in 3.4 isa disyllabic sequence in the stem-level phonology. It has two morphologicallyconditioned allomorphs, /-seen/ in the singular and /-siin/ in the plural. (55) Long form of the Illative: -seen, -siin a. Sg. /-VV-seen/: vapaaseen ‘free’, terveeseen ‘healthy’, palt- tooseen ‘overcoat’ b. Pl. /-VV-i-siin/: vapaisiin ‘free’, terveisiin ‘healthy’, palttoisiin ‘overcoats’In view of the stem-level disyllabicity of unstressed vowels, we can say thatthe long form is selected after two syllables which are affiliated with the samevowel melody, and the short form is selected elsewhere. Considering the factthat the short form’s vowel is obligatorily affiliated with the stem’s vowelmelody, the basis of this distribution seems to be a constraint which prohibitsthe configuration (56) w w αwhere α is a feature complex defining a vowel. Whatever the formulation,the descriptive generalization is in any case not in doubt. It is independentlymotivated by the allomorphy of the third person possessive suffix. The suffixhas two allomorphs, -nsa and -(h)Vn. In the latter, just as in the short form
  30. 30. 138 / PAUL K IPARSKYof the illative, h is deleted except after primary stress, and V is a copy of thepreceding vowel. The form -nsa occurs in all contexts, and -(h)Vn occurs asan optional variant after case endings ending in vowels, e.g. talo-ssa-nsa ∼talo-ssa-an ‘in his/her/their house’ (but not after bare stems, e.g. kissa-nsa,*kissa-an ‘his/her/their cat’). The point of interest is that, just like the -(h)Vnallomorph of the illative, the -(h)Vn allomorph of the 3.Sg. possessive alsodoes not appear after an unstressed long vowel (even if the second mora ofthe long vowel is a case ending). For example, the 3.Sg. possessive form of/tupa-ta/ tupaa can only be tupaansa, not *tupaahan or *tupaaan. This isanother instantiation of the constraint (56). Moreover, the distribution of the long and short forms of the illative issensitive to a stylistic vowel contraction process, exemplified by the free vari-ants in (57a) (Anttila 1999). As (57b) shows, case allomorphy obligatorilydepends on the stem’s output form. (57) a. kor.ke.a (three syllables) ∼ kor.kee (two syllables) ‘high’, le.ve.¨ a ∼ le.vee ‘broad’ (Nom.Sg.) b. kor.ke.a-an ∼ kor.kee.-seen ‘high’, le.ve.¨ -¨ n ∼ le.vee.-seen aa ‘broad’ (Ill.Sg.)The Illative Plural. After diphthongs formed by the combination of stem-final vowels with plural -i, the distribution of -hin and -siin is reveals theeffect of optional rhythmic stress in the stem phonology. After stressed diph-thongs and after short unstressed diphthongs, the form -hin is obligatory (see(58a,b)). But after long diphthongs, /-siin/ and /-hin/ are both possible (see(58c)). (58) Illative plurals: a. /CVV-i-/: /puu-i-hin/ puihin ‘trees’, /tie-i-hin/ teihin ‘roads’, /tee-i-hin/ teihin ‘teas’, /hai-i-hin/ haihin ‘sharks’ b. /-CV-i-/: /tapa-i-hin/ tapoihin ‘customs’, similarly latuihin ‘ski trails’, taloihin ‘houses’, korjaamoihin ‘repair shops’ c. /-VV-i-/: /vapaa-i-hin/ ∼ /vapaa-i-siin/ vapaihin ∼ vapaisiin ‘free’, similarly terveihin ∼ terveisiin ‘healthy’, palttoihin ∼ palttoisiin ‘overcoats’ (contracted -VV stems)The pattern in (58) is exactly what is predicted by our proposal about sec-ondary stress. Consider vapaaseen and its plural variants vapaihin ∼ va-paisiin. Underlying /vapaa/ receives initial stress; /-paa/ cannot be a stressedsyllable because of *C LASH, and it cannot be an unstressed syllable becauseof W EIGHT- TO -S TRESS. So it must be two syllables, both of them unstressedby S TRESS - TO -W EIGHT (see (46)), the former also by *C LASH. Thus theoutput of the stem phonology is v´ .pa.a. This is an instance of the context athat requires the long illative /-sVVn/. The respective nominative and illative
  31. 31. F INNISH N OUN I NFLECTION / 139singular forms surface in the word phonology as v´ .paa, v´ .paa.seen. a a In the plural, the affix /-i/ combines with the third syllable of the stemv´ .pa.a- into a diphthong -ai-, which according to the constraint system de- aveloped above receives optional secondary stress in the stem phonology. the ´resulting plural stem is either v´ .pa.ai- (CV.CV.V-, a context requiring the a ´ `long illative) or v´ .pa.` i- (CV.CV.VV-, a context requiring the short illative). a aThe respective illative plural output forms are v´ .pai.siin and v´ .pai.hin. a a The data in (59) epitomize the illative pattern discussed in the precedingparagraphs with the Illatives of vapaa ‘free’, raitis ‘sober’, and maa ‘land’. (59) Illative Singular Illative Plural a. *vapaahan vapaaseen vapaihin vapaisiin b. *raittiihin raittiiseen raittiihin raittiisiin a. maahan *maaseen maihin *maisiinInherently heavy nuclei. Certain stems ending in unstressed long vowelsor diphthongs, mostly non-native, behave like stems ending in stressed longvowels or diphthongs. The data in (60) demonstrate their behavior with re-spect to illative allomorphy. The stems rokokoo ‘rococo’, revyy ‘revue’, andblinii ‘pancake’ in (60a,b,c)) show this pattern obligatorily, and the stemskamee ‘cameo’, veesee ‘toilet’, and suklaa ‘chocolate’ in in (60d,e,f) show itoptionally. (60) Illative Singular Illative Plural a. rokokoohon *rokokooseen rokokoihin *rokokoisiin b. revyyhyn *revyyseen revyihin *revyisiin c. bliniihin *bliniiseen bliniihin *bliniisiin d. kameehen kameeseen kameihin kameisiin e. veeseehen veeseeseen veeseihin veeseisiin f. suklaahan suklaaseen suklaihin suklaisiinThe stems Tokoi (name), Petroskoi ‘Petrozavodsk’, samurai ‘samurai’, lauan-tai ‘Saturday’, and maumau ‘maumau’ in (61) show that stem-final underly-ing diphthongs behave consistently like heavy syllables. (61) Partitive Singular Genitive Plural a. Tokoita *Tokoja Tokoiden *Tokojen b. Petroskoita *Petroskoja Petroskoiden *Petroskojen c. samuraita *samuraja samuraiden *samurajen d. lauantaita *lauantaja lauantaiden *lauantajen e maumauta *maumaua *maumauiden *maumaujen21 21 For phonological reasons, stems that end in a -Vu diphthong, such as (61e), have no pluralforms at all. This is the case even if the diphthong is stressed; for example, there is no such formas *tiuissa for the Inessive Plural of tiu ‘a collection of 20’.

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