Rethinking Processes, Retrofitting Equipment anda Better Way to Monitor Board PerformanceCONVERTING THE NEW LIGHTWEIGHTS  ...
AGENDA Consolidation, Economic Metrics, Lightweights—  The New Industry Dynamics Quality and Consistency—We Can Do Bette...
Same Old, Same Old or Finally a Different Take?THE NEW INDUSTRY DYNAMICS
Consolidation RecapCONTAINERBOARD’S CHANGINGLANDSCAPE                            4
2011—A BANNER YEAR FOR TRANSACTIONS RKT/SSCC; IP/TIN   – Long-term positive for the industry   – But a lot has to happen ...
WHAT’S NEXT? G-P/PCA?   – Cultural history   – Attractive geography   – But what does Koch want?   – If ain’t it broke… ...
NEW INDY CONTAINERBOARD—THE NEWNORMAL? Oxnard and Ontario CA mills produce 550,000 tons Together Schwarz Partners and Ra...
CONTAINERBOARD SHARE BY COMPANY                Greif Brothers   Longview Fibre    Green Bay                               ...
Access to New Local Markets, Plant Consolidations,or Both?REGIONAL CONVERTING IMPLICATIONS                                ...
SIZE MATTERS For the large integrateds, it’s usually about scale and synergies   –   IP had 140 plants after Weyco, close...
THE ‘CURRENT’ ROCK TENN Even more capacity along the Route 95  corridor—MA, NJ and into the Carolinas Legacy Rock Tenn p...
ALL OVER THE EASTERN US AND CANADA                                     12
THE ‘NEW’ IP—BOX PLANT NETWORK Southern CA and Chicagoland ‘thickets’ of box  plants Northern CA, upper Midwest, eastern...
SEEING RED?              14
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR THE EVERYONE ELSEIN THE INDUSTRY? For converters, not really about reducing capacity For consoli...
Please Check the Security of your Seatbelt…INDUSTRY KEY DRIVERS                                              16
US BOX SHIPMENTS FELL 13% 2007 – 2009 Steepest decline for the market since the 1970s Shipments recovered 3.5% 2010, far...
CONTAINERBOARD EXPORT MARKETS WERE VOLATILE IN 2009-2010, BOOMED IN FIRST HALF 2011, STABLE NOW? 2009-2010 due to numerou...
OPERATING RATES INCREASED DRAMATICALLY IN 2010, EASED IN2011, STABLE GOING FORWARD? 1.03 1.00 0.97 0.94 0.91 0.88 0.85 0.8...
2011 CONTAINERBOARD INVENTORIES ‘BALANCED’, WEEKS OF SUPPLY SWELLED, THEN DECLINED IN 2012Million Short Tons              ...
When the Economics Shift, So Does the StoryVIRGIN VERSUS RECYCLED                                              21
IF ASIAN DEMAND WEAKENS, SO WILL US OCCPRICES, OR NOT?$/Short Tons   250   200   150   100    50      0          90 91 92 ...
How Does This All Play Out?CONTAINERBOARD PRICES                              23
ARE PRICES ON THE WAY UP, STAGNANT…                  …OR UNSUSTAINABLE?                                       24
What’s News?LIGHTWEIGHT CONTAINERBOARDUPDATE                             25
MAJOR LIGHTWEIGHT INITIATIVES SINCE 2006KapStone is also focused on lightweight kraft linerboard and Longviewmarkets lower...
GREENPAC BASICS Partnership which includes   – Norampac (60%): Canadian based, 6 machines, primarily     recycled, ~3% sh...
WHY WOULD THEY DO IT? Separate what’s good for the industry from what’s  good for the company 3% of the market, will be ...
LIGHTWEIGHTS—SOME MIGRATION, NOINFLUX…YET The Norampac machine is 12 months away—not too soon  for them to be developing ...
LIGHTWEIGHTS–TAKEAWAYS The case for lightweighting Technological considerations Lightweights are mainstream in Europe ...
We Can Do It Better!QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY
WHY SHOULD I BE INTERESTED? Continued consolidation-reduced supply Containerboard price fluctuations coming Internation...
QUOTE FROM GENERAL MILLS “…We realized that most of that innovation that  was happening was coming from small  companies....
WHY ULTRA LIGHTWEIGHTS? Europe linerboards tons <35# at 45% + US linerboard tons below 35# at 17% European paper making...
RECENT INDUSTRY HEADLINES--USA Converting plants energy self-sufficient Solar panel fields at RFC and Maxco OCC prices ...
WHERE ARE LIGHTWEIGHTS PRODUCED?   Atlantic Packaging and Rock-Tenn Solvay   IP Pensacola (all export) UFS machine   SP...
Engineering Parameters for 20# Linerboard-a working document                                          Unit           BEST ...
Single Stream Waste Headed Where?                                    38
NEW FIBRES TO NORTH AMERICAN CONTAINERBOARDS  Sugar Cane  Ground wood (newsprint)  Eucalyptus  Hemp  Northern Europea...
LEADING EDGE CORRUGATOR TECHNOLOGY Automatic web tension controls IR temperature sensors at six locations Crews, qualit...
LEADING EDGE CORRUGATOR TECHNOLOGY Precise glue applicator gravure rolls. Containerboard from only two paper machines  w...
STATE OF ART: CONVERTING Three minute change anilox rolls Ink control systems: now temperature Bobst PolyJoiner, AMS’s ...
STATE OF ART: CONVERTING Flexos 15,000-20,000 blanks/hour Continuous run, set up while running Non-crush converting-Emb...
SHELF-READY AND RETAIL-READY PACKAGING          Courtesy of Mid-Atlantic Packaging                                        ...
REQUIRES INNOVATION AND REDESIGN Doublewall: E/B, B/B, E/E, E/F Design for smaller boxes, boxes with master  pack, RRP, ...
CHALMERS TORSION TESTER                          46
AICC EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES47
THIRD EDITION: END USER NEEDS                                48
STAYING INFORMED                   49
EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES                        50
RESOURCE: 2ND SCIENCE OF PAPER SCHOOL                                        51
EVEN MORE RESOURCES                      52
It’s All About Crushing the BoardMD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS AND BOXPERFORMANCE
WHAT DOES THIS RAILWAY BRIDGE……AND A PIECE OF CORRUGATED BOARD HAVE IN COMMON?                                            ...
CORRUGATED BOARD Caliper           Bending Stiffness = Tensile Stiffness of the           Liners x Board Caliper²         ...
MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS Why is MD Torsional Stiffness Important? 1. MD Torsional Stiffness is a measure of the    “Structur...
WHAT PROPERTY BEST DEFINES ‘STRUCTURE’MD Torsional Stiffness                Unstrained board flute profile                ...
MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESSThere are three important times when you needto know about MD Torsional Stiffness1. When you are mak...
MD Torsional Stiffness TestingAn easy and accurate way to measure MD TorsionalStiffness using a natural resonance techniqu...
BUILDING IN TORSIONAL STIFFNESS:CORRUGATOR INFLUENCES   Selection of liners and mediums – type, quality, basis weight   ...
CORRUGATOR LABYRINTH – THE CONVERTOR’S INPUT                                               61
FLUTE PROFILE        C4 more triangular than C2        C4 better bracing, higher MDTS        Lower ECT and takeup facto...
FLUTE SHAPE EFFECTS                                             --------------MDTS bpi----------------Construction, #s   C...
CORRUGATING ROLL WEAR – C FLUTE                 14                 13                 12                         New modul...
PERFORMANCE – BASIS WEIGHT VS. TORSIONALSTIFFNESS MEASURE                          180                          160       ...
B/C DW – PITCH RATIOS            BC flute with conventional pitch ratio of 11/9              BC flute with adapted pitch r...
TYPICAL IMPROVEMENTS ON CORRUGATOR USINGMD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS                                  Kiwi Fruit Board Grade BPI...
BOARD PROPERTIES VS CRUSH                            68
C FLUTE CRUSH VS MDTS AND CALIPER            100                90                                  Caliper               ...
MDTS BEFORE & AFTER CONVERTING - USA                 16                 14                 12                 10    DST (b...
USA DATA                   DST (bpi)             Caliper                  ECT           % Change board to boxSample   Flut...
HOW PRINTING AFFECTS CRUSH                             72
TCY40 PRINTER                                                                After gap adjustments           16           ...
MDTS AND STACKING PERFORMANCE                                74
EFFECT OF CRUSH                  75
COST SAVINGS MODEL                                                                                                  Medium...
WHO IS TESTING MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS? Australia             Estonia   Hungary            Poland Austria               Eng...
MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS IS:   The missing major strength property of corrugated board   The property that tells you how w...
IMPLEMENTING AN MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESSPROGRAM WILL ALLOW YOU TO:   Improve the quality of corrugated board off the corrug...
Rethinking Processes, Retrofitting Equipmentand a Better Way to Monitor BoardPerformanceCONVERTING THE NEWLIGHTWEIGHTS    ...
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Aicc meeting 12_converting_lightweights

  1. 1. Rethinking Processes, Retrofitting Equipment anda Better Way to Monitor Board PerformanceCONVERTING THE NEW LIGHTWEIGHTS Sarilee Norton, President Ralph Young, AICC Technical Director Randy Banks, President, Sharp-International
  2. 2. AGENDA Consolidation, Economic Metrics, Lightweights— The New Industry Dynamics Quality and Consistency—We Can Do Better Crushing the Board--What Do We Really Know About Where We’re Losing It? 2
  3. 3. Same Old, Same Old or Finally a Different Take?THE NEW INDUSTRY DYNAMICS
  4. 4. Consolidation RecapCONTAINERBOARD’S CHANGINGLANDSCAPE 4
  5. 5. 2011—A BANNER YEAR FOR TRANSACTIONS RKT/SSCC; IP/TIN – Long-term positive for the industry – But a lot has to happen first ‘Discipline in the containerboard and corrugated box markets’ – TIN and SSCC—5th and 6th out of six – Someone has to do it – TIN—better cost structure and high integration strategy Kapstone and Boise What else? What’s next? 5
  6. 6. WHAT’S NEXT? G-P/PCA? – Cultural history – Attractive geography – But what does Koch want? – If ain’t it broke… Pratt marches to its own tune Boise, a buyer or a seller? Still a lot of 1-2% players out there Multi-plant independents and sheet feeders 6
  7. 7. NEW INDY CONTAINERBOARD—THE NEWNORMAL? Oxnard and Ontario CA mills produce 550,000 tons Together Schwarz Partners and Rand-Whitney operate more than 20 converting facilities If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em—benefits of scale and supply source ownership “This investment represents a generational commitment by both families to the industry. We have been looking for opportunities to grow, and these two California mills are located in what we believe to be a very strategic market for the future of our industry. They represent two assets that would be very difficult, if not impossible, to replicate today.” 7
  8. 8. CONTAINERBOARD SHARE BY COMPANY Greif Brothers Longview Fibre Green Bay All Other 2% 2% 2% 7% International Paper Shown in 3 unlabeled wedges:Rand Whitney+ 34% Schwarz Interstate Resources 2%Boise Atlantic/New Forest 1.0-1.5% each 2%Kapstone Simpson Paper 2%Pratt 3% Shown in ‘All Other’:Norampac Orange County Cont. 3% Hood Industries 0.5-1.0% each PCA Sonoco Products 7% Durango Group Rock-Tenn Georgia-Pacific 20% 11% 8
  9. 9. Access to New Local Markets, Plant Consolidations,or Both?REGIONAL CONVERTING IMPLICATIONS 9
  10. 10. SIZE MATTERS For the large integrateds, it’s usually about scale and synergies – IP had 140 plants after Weyco, closed over a dozen – Smurfit-Stone ~110 in 2008, RKT less than 100 today – TIN closed several, IP has closed four more already  Pick the best facility in overlapping local markets or shut down and start over For smaller integrateds and regionals, a good way to enlarge capabilities and extend geographic reach For the independents, a great time reinforce quality, service and responsiveness you provide 10
  11. 11. THE ‘CURRENT’ ROCK TENN Even more capacity along the Route 95 corridor—MA, NJ and into the Carolinas Legacy Rock Tenn presence in TN, GA, AL Mega resources in Chicago-to-Milwaukee stretch Only US based supplier with major position in Canada 11
  12. 12. ALL OVER THE EASTERN US AND CANADA 12
  13. 13. THE ‘NEW’ IP—BOX PLANT NETWORK Southern CA and Chicagoland ‘thickets’ of box plants Northern CA, upper Midwest, eastern PA, the Carolinas, northwest GA, TN, central FL and LA-TX are also capacity pockets. Except for the Dakotas, the Rocky Mountain states and sparse coverage in New England, they are EVERYWHERE! And 10 box plants in Mexico 13
  14. 14. SEEING RED? 14
  15. 15. WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR THE EVERYONE ELSEIN THE INDUSTRY? For converters, not really about reducing capacity For consolidators, ‘synergies’ imply fixed cost reductions—headcount, bricks and mortar, services, property obligations, inventory baseload Where are the two major networks saturated? Shutdowns always put some accounts in jeopardy For most customers, this is still a local business For the containerboard supply, may be fewer mills, but capacity not likely to shrink 15
  16. 16. Please Check the Security of your Seatbelt…INDUSTRY KEY DRIVERS 16
  17. 17. US BOX SHIPMENTS FELL 13% 2007 – 2009 Steepest decline for the market since the 1970s Shipments recovered 3.5% 2010, far more subdued than the growth in manufacturing Since 2010, essentially flat through the third quarter 2012, continued strong headwinds for the US economy will prevail before market accelerates to 3% (?) growth in 2013 and 2014 Long-term, box shipments may average 1.5% – Containerboard to grow at a more sedate 1.0% rate – Shift to lightweight liner takes hold in North America 17
  18. 18. CONTAINERBOARD EXPORT MARKETS WERE VOLATILE IN 2009-2010, BOOMED IN FIRST HALF 2011, STABLE NOW? 2009-2010 due to numerous factors – Global credit crisis and economic shocks – Black liquor credit for US mills – Shortages that developed following capacity closures – Fluctuating domestic demand By and large, exports supported containerboard prices at higher levels than the historical norm but growth in China’s capacity may have a dampening impact going forward Latin America a growing export market, but can it make enough of a difference 18
  19. 19. OPERATING RATES INCREASED DRAMATICALLY IN 2010, EASED IN2011, STABLE GOING FORWARD? 1.03 1.00 0.97 0.94 0.91 0.88 0.85 0.82 0.79 0.76 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19
  20. 20. 2011 CONTAINERBOARD INVENTORIES ‘BALANCED’, WEEKS OF SUPPLY SWELLED, THEN DECLINED IN 2012Million Short Tons Weeks of Supply 3.2 Million Tons 6.0 Weeks of Supply (R) 3.0 5.5 2.8 5.0 2.6 4.5 2.4 4.0 2.2 3.5 2.0 3.0 1.8 2.5 J99 J00 J01 J02 J03 J04 J05 J06 J07 J08 J09 J10 J11 J12 20
  21. 21. When the Economics Shift, So Does the StoryVIRGIN VERSUS RECYCLED 21
  22. 22. IF ASIAN DEMAND WEAKENS, SO WILL US OCCPRICES, OR NOT?$/Short Tons 250 200 150 100 50 0 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 22
  23. 23. How Does This All Play Out?CONTAINERBOARD PRICES 23
  24. 24. ARE PRICES ON THE WAY UP, STAGNANT… …OR UNSUSTAINABLE? 24
  25. 25. What’s News?LIGHTWEIGHT CONTAINERBOARDUPDATE 25
  26. 26. MAJOR LIGHTWEIGHT INITIATIVES SINCE 2006KapStone is also focused on lightweight kraft linerboard and Longviewmarkets lower basis weight grades Company Location Capacity Material OriginInternational Pensacola, FL 500,000 Kraft linerboard Conversion fromPaper uncoated free sheetNew Forest Scarborough, ON 250,000 Recycled liner/ Greenfield mediumPratt Industries Shreveport, LA 350,000 Recycled liner/ Greenfield mediumKPAQ St. Francisville, LA 220,000 Kraft linerboard Conversion from fine paperAbitibi Bowater Coosa Pines, AL 100,000 Recycled Conversion fromSP Newsprint Dublin, GA ? containerboard/ newsprint paperGreenpac Niagara Falls, NY 540,000 Recycled New machine adjacent linerboard to existing site 26
  27. 27. GREENPAC BASICS Partnership which includes – Norampac (60%): Canadian based, 6 machines, primarily recycled, ~3% share of North America – Jamestown Container, Containerboard Partners and affiliated box plants – Integration of newly purchased Bird Packaging 328-inch multi-fourdrinier recycled linerboard machine; 540,000 tons capacity; will represent almost 2% of N.A. linerboard capacity in 2013. Basis weight range 20-35#; will trim 3-out to meet modern corrugator requirements 27
  28. 28. WHY WOULD THEY DO IT? Separate what’s good for the industry from what’s good for the company 3% of the market, will be 6th, after PCA and Pratt 5 mills; 1.1 million tons, mainly recycled (inc. Trenton) – No virgin liner capabilities – Machines are narrower, slower, older – Will trim only 2 or on some just 1 roll for 98- and 110-inch corrugators – Highest cash costs of the top six 28
  29. 29. LIGHTWEIGHTS—SOME MIGRATION, NOINFLUX…YET The Norampac machine is 12 months away—not too soon for them to be developing customer opportunities and marketing strategy Pratt is producing lightweight recycled liner and medium at three mills, day in, day out Kapstone, Longview, Atlantic and others are marketing lightweight grades Reports that additional companies are quietly running lighter weights for specific customers Some Europeans would love to find a way to serve the US market. 29
  30. 30. LIGHTWEIGHTS–TAKEAWAYS The case for lightweighting Technological considerations Lightweights are mainstream in Europe The pull of global CPGs and retailers  Virgin versus recycled—who wins? Will Norampac be the first or the only? 30
  31. 31. We Can Do It Better!QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY
  32. 32. WHY SHOULD I BE INTERESTED? Continued consolidation-reduced supply Containerboard price fluctuations coming International companies buying in Europe Elevated combining and converting technologies new flutes M, R, S, and T Methods to evaluate sheet suppliers New packaging designs Prepare for shelf and retail ready packaging Financial savings could be substantial 32
  33. 33. QUOTE FROM GENERAL MILLS “…We realized that most of that innovation that was happening was coming from small companies.” “Most of the innovation is also happening outside the U.S” “We want to drive cost savings through a focus on performance needs.” Joe Piton , Buyer, FBA 2012 Annual Meeting 33
  34. 34. WHY ULTRA LIGHTWEIGHTS? Europe linerboards tons <35# at 45% + US linerboard tons below 35# at 17% European paper making and combining highly sophisticated Australians are here, Europeans are coming— fifteen years ahead of us Cost effectiveness and sustainability 34
  35. 35. RECENT INDUSTRY HEADLINES--USA Converting plants energy self-sufficient Solar panel fields at RFC and Maxco OCC prices still high, wood unchanged Collection of OCC at 91%-an all time high Export of US OCC now over 40% Recovered fibre inclusion in containerboard at 46%- all time high in US, Europe 85% Mills reduce fresh water usage, burn biofuels 35
  36. 36. WHERE ARE LIGHTWEIGHTS PRODUCED? Atlantic Packaging and Rock-Tenn Solvay IP Pensacola (all export) UFS machine SP Newsprint-GA Kapstone-NC and SC Converted SBS machines- KPAQ-LA Norampac (GreenPac) Niagara Falls Grupo Unipak Mexico? Longview Fibre: Port Townsend-WA On the drawing board-newsprint Imports? 36
  37. 37. Engineering Parameters for 20# Linerboard-a working document Unit BEST TEST TAPPI of IN LINER TEST Longview KPAQ SP KapStone Greenpac Rock-Tenn Measurement CLASS 2 PROCEDURE Newprint SolvayPHYSICAL PROPERTIESMoisture Content Percent T-412 target 8 8 7 7 8 7 CD variation +/- 1.5 +/- 2.0 +/- 1.5 +1.75/-2.6 nr moisture streakInternal Bond (Z tensile) 0.001 ft lbs/in2 138 100Cobb (sizing) T-441 Top 2 minute min/max g/m2 32 28 50 and 105 30 and 65 50 25 and 70 Bottom 2 minute min/max g/m2 TBD 112 50 and 105 30 and 65 50 35 and 75Smoothness- Sheffield units 280 TBD T-538 360 target 390 365Porosity-Gurley sec/100 cc 50 36 T-460 50-200 18 20Burst- Mullen lb-f/in2 67 31 T-807 60 55 45 60RC lb-f/6 in or units T-822 36 25STFI 11.4 6.9 T-826 11.5 12.5 9.5 12.6MD Slide Angle degrees 18 min TBD T-815 26 target 20 25MD Tensile Strength ft-lbs/in 58 TBD T-494CD Tensile Strength ft-lbs/in 29 TBD T-494MD Stiffness ft-lbs/in 5543 TBD T-494CD Stiffness ft-lbs/in 2229 TBD T-494MD Tear gf TBD 1.61 T-494CD Tear gf TBD 2.26 T-414Luminous Reflectance L value TBD TBD T-414Hard Caliper 0.001 inches 5.1 7.6 T-411 6.5 6.2Basis Weight #/msf 20 T-410 20 +/- 1# 20.5 20.5 20Scuff # strokes TBD TBD target 30Wax Pick Dennison # 16 TBD T459Dirt mm2/m2 TBD TBD T-563Date of document 2/18/2011 RAY RAY 1/1/2012 1/14/2011 5/11/2012 6/15/2012 TBD TBD© 2012 Association of Independent Still InCorrugated Convertors develop-ment 37
  38. 38. Single Stream Waste Headed Where? 38
  39. 39. NEW FIBRES TO NORTH AMERICAN CONTAINERBOARDS  Sugar Cane  Ground wood (newsprint)  Eucalyptus  Hemp  Northern European hardwoods  Mixed office waste with coatings Challenges to waste paper dealers, papermakers, combiners, converters, and corrugated users 39
  40. 40. LEADING EDGE CORRUGATOR TECHNOLOGY Automatic web tension controls IR temperature sensors at six locations Crews, quality personnel, or lab technicians that conduct temperature audits every shift. Moisture sensors at two locations and a manual moisture analyzer for combined board at the dry end of the machine Speed sensitive warp arm adjusters on the preheaters and preconditioners. 40
  41. 41. LEADING EDGE CORRUGATOR TECHNOLOGY Precise glue applicator gravure rolls. Containerboard from only two paper machines with specific fibre length and sheet formation. Automatic load controls on the double facer Concise recipes (machine settings) for each board combination Controls to monitor and adjust adhesive temperature and viscosity 41
  42. 42. STATE OF ART: CONVERTING Three minute change anilox rolls Ink control systems: now temperature Bobst PolyJoiner, AMS’s Tri-Feeder New prefeeder systems Lighter weight back anvil covers 42
  43. 43. STATE OF ART: CONVERTING Flexos 15,000-20,000 blanks/hour Continuous run, set up while running Non-crush converting-Emba and others Robotic bundle handling-Automatän Optical scanners: adhesion and slots 43
  44. 44. SHELF-READY AND RETAIL-READY PACKAGING Courtesy of Mid-Atlantic Packaging 44
  45. 45. REQUIRES INNOVATION AND REDESIGN Doublewall: E/B, B/B, E/E, E/F Design for smaller boxes, boxes with master pack, RRP, SRP, counter displays, headers Faster merging of small flute and folding carton applications Greater opportunities for small flute now that emerging containerboards are available. Carton within a carton 45
  46. 46. CHALMERS TORSION TESTER 46
  47. 47. AICC EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES47
  48. 48. THIRD EDITION: END USER NEEDS 48
  49. 49. STAYING INFORMED 49
  50. 50. EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 50
  51. 51. RESOURCE: 2ND SCIENCE OF PAPER SCHOOL 51
  52. 52. EVEN MORE RESOURCES 52
  53. 53. It’s All About Crushing the BoardMD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS AND BOXPERFORMANCE
  54. 54. WHAT DOES THIS RAILWAY BRIDGE……AND A PIECE OF CORRUGATED BOARD HAVE IN COMMON? 54
  55. 55. CORRUGATED BOARD Caliper Bending Stiffness = Tensile Stiffness of the Liners x Board Caliper² 55
  56. 56. MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS Why is MD Torsional Stiffness Important? 1. MD Torsional Stiffness is a measure of the “Structure” of the whole board but especially the flutes 2. MD Torsional Stiffness failure leads to Bending Stiffness Failure 3. Bending Stiffness Failure leads to Compression Failure 4. Compression Failure leads to Box Failure 5. Box Failure leads to very unhappy clients 6. If you don’t measure it you can not control it 56
  57. 57. WHAT PROPERTY BEST DEFINES ‘STRUCTURE’MD Torsional Stiffness Unstrained board flute profile Liner movement indicated by arrows 57
  58. 58. MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESSThere are three important times when you needto know about MD Torsional Stiffness1. When you are making it2. When you are destroying it3. When you are guaranteeing your box performance 58
  59. 59. MD Torsional Stiffness TestingAn easy and accurate way to measure MD TorsionalStiffness using a natural resonance technique 59
  60. 60. BUILDING IN TORSIONAL STIFFNESS:CORRUGATOR INFLUENCES Selection of liners and mediums – type, quality, basis weight Corrugating temperature, moisture, friction, drag Corrugating rolls – profile, size, wear Glue application – film thickness, evenness, quality Adhesion – pressure roll, tack development, temperature Pressure rolls during drying Slitting Feed rolls anywhere 60
  61. 61. CORRUGATOR LABYRINTH – THE CONVERTOR’S INPUT 61
  62. 62. FLUTE PROFILE  C4 more triangular than C2  C4 better bracing, higher MDTS  Lower ECT and takeup factor (TUF) 62
  63. 63. FLUTE SHAPE EFFECTS --------------MDTS bpi----------------Construction, #s Construction, grammes Model est. C2 C4 ECT C2 ECT C4 36/31/36 K175(D150)K175 14.4 12.2 16.1 6.1 6.2 42/31/39 K205(D150)K190 15.6 13.3 17.9 7.0 6.1 42/31/42 K205(D150)K205 16.1 13.3 19.3 6.9 5.7 42/39/39 K205(M190HP)K190 21.2 17.7 23.2 8.1 8.0 42/39/39 K205(M190HP)K205 21.6 17.8 23.4 8.6 8.2 Averages 17.8 14.9 20.0 7.3 6.8 % Differences -16.4 12.4 -6.8 C4 is 34% Stiffer than C2 63
  64. 64. CORRUGATING ROLL WEAR – C FLUTE 14 13 12 New module BPI 11 BPI and ECT 10 9 8 Worn module 7 6 5 ECT 4 9-Nov 19-Nov 29-Nov 9-Dec 19-Dec 29-Dec 8-Jan 18-Jan 64
  65. 65. PERFORMANCE – BASIS WEIGHT VS. TORSIONALSTIFFNESS MEASURE 180 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Combined Basis Box Performance Weight (#s/MSF) Index (BPI) Lightweight B/C DW 96.3 14.2 (24.6/16.4M/16.4M/18.4M/20.5) Standard B/C DW 159 15.3 (42.0/23.0M/29.0/23.0M/42.0)
  66. 66. B/C DW – PITCH RATIOS BC flute with conventional pitch ratio of 11/9 BC flute with adapted pitch ratio of 4/3 BC flute with adapted pitch ratio of 3/2
  67. 67. TYPICAL IMPROVEMENTS ON CORRUGATOR USINGMD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS Kiwi Fruit Board Grade BPI Comparisons # Paper Make up Comments BPI 1 DCK170(M190HP)K175(D115)K230-BE 2011 Grade 31.6 CONTROL MLs MBs 2011 Exisiting B SC adds 9.2% BPI ambient even 2 DCK170(SC180)K135(D115)K230-BE 34.8 9.2% flute Rolls after reduction of middle liner. New B fresh rolls (no flank or New B flute Rolls 6.6% 3 DCK170(SC180)K135(D115)K230-BE 37.1 profile change) adds a further 13.3.12 (14.8%) 6.6% 4 DCK170(M190HP)K175(D115)K275-BE 2011 Grade 31.4 CONTROL I Ts 2011 Exisiting B SC adds 9.2% BPI ambient even 5 DCK170(SC180)K135(D115)K275-BE 34.8 9.8% flute Rolls after reduction of middle liner. New B fresh rolls (no flank or New B flute Rolls 14.3% 6 DCK170(SC180)K135(D115)K275-BE 40.6 profile change) adds a further 13.3.12 (29.3%) 14.3% Ian, im sending this to you in confidence. F.Y.I. and you may find interesting. The calipers have also increased & ECT only marginally. M The xls is pretty self explanatory but we have 3 sets of figures from numerous tests Dec 11 though to last week in 412 comparing old 2011 CONTROL & failing Kiwi Fruit Trays to new Semi Chem data & recently new B flute rolls installed 13.3.12 ..NOTE the new B flute is not a new flank clearance/profile/T//Up its just a straight replacement.Without knowing the MDTS, these impressiveimprovements would not be identified 67
  68. 68. BOARD PROPERTIES VS CRUSH 68
  69. 69. C FLUTE CRUSH VS MDTS AND CALIPER 100 90 Caliper 2 R = 0.9627 80 70 60 Vaule (%) 50 DST 40 30 20 R2 = 0.9903 10 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Crush (% ) 69
  70. 70. MDTS BEFORE & AFTER CONVERTING - USA 16 14 12 10 DST (bpi) 8 6 4 2 0 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10 Sample Number 100 80 DST % Retained 60 40 20 0 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10 Sample Number 70
  71. 71. USA DATA DST (bpi) Caliper ECT % Change board to boxSample Flute Board Box Board mm Box mm Board Box DST Caliper ECT 1 C 11.02 6.96 4.34 4.06 66.84 51.03 -36.8 -6.4 -23.7 2 C 5.74 3.32 3.89 3.63 36.32 33.65 -42.2 -6.5 -7.4 3 C 14.28 11.58 4.17 4.19 50.14 50.42 -18.9 0.6 0.6 4 C 9.16 1.5 4.04 3.73 40.86 37.81 -83.6 -7.5 -7.5 5 C 8.52 7.52 3.96 3.99 37.8 34.52 -11.7 0.6 -8.7 6 C 8.28 5.52 4.14 4.09 48.48 49.69 -33.3 -1.2 2.5 7 C 6.86 6 3.81 3.78 33.84 33.99 -12.5 -0.7 0.4 8 C 11.68 7.24 4.11 3.97 45.1 42.7 -38.0 -3.5 -5.3 9 C 10.52 7.62 4.11 3.99 48.81 43.76 -27.6 -3.1 -10.3 10 C 10.06 4.84 4.16 3.86 47.3 41.4 -51.9 -7.2 -12.5 Ave 9.6 6.2 4.1 3.9 45.5 41.9 -35.7 -3.5 -7.2 Min 5.7 1.5 3.8 3.6 33.8 33.7 -83.6 -7.5 -23.7 Max 14.3 11.6 4.3 4.2 66.8 51.0 -11.7 0.6 2.5 71
  72. 72. HOW PRINTING AFFECTS CRUSH 72
  73. 73. TCY40 PRINTER After gap adjustments 16 Corri Increase in MDTS = 35.6% Caliper mm 14 13.5 13.6 13.6 13.6 Corri BPI 12.2 BPI Log—Conv. Print Caliper 11.9 12 11.2 10.8 10 Conv Exponential—Conv. Print BPI Plain Caliper 7.9 mm 8 7.6 Conv Plain BPI 6 Caliper 4.01 3.98 3.95 4.12 4.12 4.08 4.08 4.02 4.1 3.9 4.1 Conv 4 Print Caliper Exponential--Conv. mm Plain BPI 2 Conv Print BPI 0 Feed ex Corrugator TCY 40 no setting 1st TRIAL increased 2nd TRIAL increased 3rd TRIAL decreased # 4th TRIAL decreased # changes as we found it. Infeed rollers 0.75 to 1.7 stacker infeed from 7.5 1 print station Green 2.7 2 print station Blue 2.8 to (not calibrated) BPI not to 9.0 to 3.5 3.2 recorded. Estimate between 7.6 to 7.9 Trial Action 73
  74. 74. MDTS AND STACKING PERFORMANCE 74
  75. 75. EFFECT OF CRUSH 75
  76. 76. COST SAVINGS MODEL Medium Offset Actual = tested DST ALTER board grades & prices Use -5.057 lbs to gsm x = 4.882 RF -5.057 SC -2.057 USA Board Grade - C Flute Cost/1000ft² DB Medium SF Actual Theory DST Old Board $ 27.44 Now 35 23 35 9 11.0 New Board $ 25.20 New 31 23 31 10.0 Cost Savings $ 2.24 Cost % savings 8% Weight savings (lbs) 8 Wgt % savings 8%
  77. 77. WHO IS TESTING MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS? Australia Estonia Hungary Poland Austria England Ireland Scotland Belgium Fiji Italy Spain Chile France Lithuania Sweden Czech Republic Germany New Zealand Thailand Denmark Holland Papua New Guinea USA 26 Australasia/Pacific 88 Europe USA - ? 77
  78. 78. MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESS IS: The missing major strength property of corrugated board The property that tells you how well you make your board The property that tells you how badly you crushed your board The property that tells you how well your board will perform in the service environment The property that leads to box failures in a stack The major property you need for quality control The property that allows you to optimize board grade performance 78
  79. 79. IMPLEMENTING AN MD TORSIONAL STIFFNESSPROGRAM WILL ALLOW YOU TO: Improve the quality of corrugated board off the corrugator. Improve the quality of finished boxes off the RDC/FFG. Reduce damage during conversion Setup a QC system to guarantee optimal performance Reduce board weight Shift money from raw material cost to the bottom line Reduce customer complaints Keep an eye on your competition 79
  80. 80. Rethinking Processes, Retrofitting Equipmentand a Better Way to Monitor BoardPerformanceCONVERTING THE NEWLIGHTWEIGHTS Sarilee Norton, President Ralph Young, AICC Technical Director Randy Banks, President, Sharp-International

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