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OER Schools Conference - Josie Fraser

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On 29 January 2015, Leicester City Council, in partnership with De Montfort University, held a free day conference for schools focusing on finding, using, creating and sharing Open Educational Resources (OER). The event builds on the council’s recently released OER guidance and resources, which can be downloaded from http://schools.leicester.gov.uk/openeducation

The conference opened with panel presentations and a Q&A session. Josie Fraser reviews the permission provided by Leicester City Council to community and voluntary controlled schools, and discusses how schools can take advantage of this.

On 29 January 2015, Leicester City Council, in partnership with De Montfort University, held a free day conference for schools focusing on finding, using, creating and sharing Open Educational Resources (OER). The event builds on the council’s recently released OER guidance and resources, which can be downloaded from http://schools.leicester.gov.uk/openeducation

The conference opened with panel presentations and a Q&A session. Josie Fraser reviews the permission provided by Leicester City Council to community and voluntary controlled schools, and discusses how schools can take advantage of this.

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OER Schools Conference - Josie Fraser

  1. 1. OER Schools Conference #OERSCH15 29th January 2015
  2. 2. Welcome! Chair: Richard Hall Panel: Bjoern Hassler, Marieke Guy, Josie Fraser, & Miles Berry #OERSCH15
  3. 3. OER Schools: Permission, Policy, Practice Josie Fraser ICT Strategy Lead (Children’s Capital) Leicester City Council
  4. 4. Why has Leicester City Council given permission for staff at community and voluntary controlled schools in the city to openly license the educational resources they produce in the line of their employment?
  5. 5. • Empowering schools and school staff • Promoting & sharing great work • Ensuring Public Value • Equality of access to learning for all • Understanding & modelling copyright • Supporting collaborative & open practice
  6. 6. What does the permission mean? • “Educational resources” • “Openly licence” • Why do we need a local policy in place? • What about voluntary aided schools, foundation schools (or trusts), and academies?
  7. 7. Leicester City Council recommends Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)‘ OER Schools: Permission, Policy, Practice by Josie Fraser/Leicester City Council, is licensed under CC BY 4.0
  8. 8. Key questions for schools • Do staff know about open licensing? • Are all staff aware of the new permission? • Which is your schools preferred open licence? • What resources should/could schools and staff be sharing? • How staff be supported to share work openly?

Editor's Notes

  • OER Schools Conference, 29th January 2015, Leicester UK: http://www.digilitleic.com/?p=652


  • Richard Hall (@HallyMK1 on Twitter) is Professor of Education and Technology at De Montfort University (DMU), Leicester, UK. He is DMU’s Head of Enhancing Learning through Technology and leads the Centre for Pedagogic Research. Richard is a National Teaching Fellow and a co-operator at the Social Science Centre in Lincoln, UK. He writes about life in higher education at: http://richard-hall.org.

    Bjoern Hassler (@bjoernhassler on Twitter) focuses on pedagogy, Open Educational Resources (OER) and digital technology. He led the JISC-funded ORBIT project, which produced an Open Resource Bank on Interactive Teaching for teacher education, focusing on innovative digital technology use in mathematics and science education. He is co-leading the OER4Schools project, introducing interactive teaching and digital technologies in Zambian primary schools.

    Marieke Guy (@mariekeguy on Twitter) is a project co-ordinator at Open Knowledge, a global not-for-profit organisation that wants to open up knowledge around the world and see it used and useful. Over the last two years she has been exploring open data in education and its relationship with open education as part of the LinkedUp Project. Her current projects are PASTEUR4OA , developing and/or reinforcing open access strategies and policies across Europe, and Europeana Space, creating new opportunities for employment and economic growth within the creative industries sector based on Europe’s rich digital cultural resources. Marieke has been working with online information for over 16 years and was previously employed by UKOLN, a centre of expertise in digital information management at the University of Bath. Marieke co-ordinates the Open Education Working Group.

    Josie Fraser (@josiefraser on Twitter) is a UK-based Social and Educational Technologist. Since June 2010, she has lead on technology for Leicester City Council’s multi-million pound Building Schools for the Future (BSF) Programme, one of the most accelerated building programmes in the UK. She is also responsible for setting, promoting and delivering on a city wide agenda for educational transformation in relation to the use of technology within schools. She developed and leads on the DigiLit Leicester staff development project, run in partnership with De Montfort University and the 23 BSF schools. The project achieved recognition as one of five global winners of the Reclaim Open Learning innovation competition, organised by the MacArthur Foundation, The Digital Media and Learning Hub, and MIT Media Lab. 

    Miles Berry  (@mberry on Twitter) is principal lecturer and the subject leader for Computing Education at the University of Roehampton. He teaches initial teacher education courses, and his principal research focus is the role of online communities in the professional formation and development of teachers. Other professional interests include knowledge management in education, use of open source software and principles in schools, provision for the gifted and talented and independent learning. Miles was part of the drafting groups for computing in the 2014 national curriculum. Until 2009, Miles was head of Alton Convent Prep. In his former post as deputy head of St Ives School, Haslemere, he pioneered the use of Moodle and Elgg in primary education. His work on implementing Moodle was documented as the dissertation for Leicester University’s MBA in Educational Management, and won the 2006 Becta ICT in Practice Award for primary teaching.
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