Official Report                Published by theX TH O LYMPIADE C OMMITTEE OF THE GAMES OF LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 1932, LTD.
COPYRIGHT, 1933                                            XTH OLYMPIADE COMMITTEE                                OF THE G...
DedicatedTo the Principles and Ideals           of    Modern Olympism
ForewordT       HE ORGANIZING COMMITTEE of the Games of the Xt h       Olympiad fulfils its final obligation by presenting...
Honorable Herbert Hoover       PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICAHONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE GAMES OF THE XTH OLYMPIAD
Founding of the Modern GamesT       HE revival of the modern Olympic Games, the first of which were celebrated in       At...
Baron Pierre de CoubertinFOUNDER AND LIFE HONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES
By Baron Pierre de Coubertin, Founder of Modern Olympism"       HE main issue in life is not the victory but the fight ; t...
Count de Baillet-LatourPRESIDENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE
Count de Baillet-Latour                           Organizer of the Modern Games  I      PROMISED at Prague to discuss this...
The Olympic StructureT       HE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTE E is the central world-governing       body to the extent t...
International Olympic Committee             FOUNDER . . . . . . . BARON PIERRE DE COUBERTIN                 LIFE HONORARY ...
R. C. ALDAO                R. COOMBES                      JAMES TAYLOR          DR. THEODORE SCHMIDT              COUNT D...
BARON DE LAVELEYE               ARNALDO GUINLE                 DR. FERREIRA SANTOS             JAMES G. MERRICK           ...
National Olympic Committees         ARGENTINE                               GERMANY                               MEXICOHo...
HORACIO BUSTOS MORÓN (h)           CARMELO CALARCO               JAMES    TAYLOR              JAMES    S.   W.   EVE      ...
SIR HAROLD BOWDEN, Bt., G.B.E.     EVAN A. HUNTER, O.B.E.              JEAN DROSSOPOULOS            MICHEL RINOPOULOS     ...
BRIG. GEN.  TlRSO HERNÁNDEZ              ALFONSO ROJO DE LA VEGA                    RT. HON. G. W. FORBES                 ...
International Sports FederationsINTERNATIONAL ATHLETIC FEDERATION                         INTERNATIONAL MODERN PENTATHLON ...
J. SIGFRID EDSTRÖM                      BO EKELUND                     OSCAR SÖDERLUND                  VAL BARKER        ...
HERBERT HOOVER                                                   BARON PIERRE DE COUBERTIN                             Pre...
WILLIAM MAY GARLAND                              WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY                       PresidentLOUIS B. MAYER        ...
The Organizing Committee              of the Games of the                  Xth Olympiad                                   ...
HARRY J. BAUER   FRANK J. BELCHER, JR.      ARTHUR S. BENTDR. FRANK F. BARHAM                             Treasurer       ...
T h e G a m e s o f     t h e X t h O l y m p i a d       The Games of the Xth OlympiadT      HE GAMES of the Xth Olympiad...
X t h   O l y m p i a d   L o s   A n g e l e s   1 9 3 2       It must be remembered that the Olympic movement has no for...
776 B. C.—1932 A. D.:—THE GREAT SEQUOIASTHE REDWOOD TREES OF CALIFORNIA ARE THE ONLY LIVING THINGS WHICH WERE ALIVE       ...
T h e   G a m e s   o f   t h e   X t h   O l y m p i a dof preparations, without neglecting any of her specific Olympic o...
“ THE OLYMPIC CITY ”
O r g a n i z a t i o n   o f   t h e   G a m e s    Organization of the Games of the              Xth OlympiadI   T IS th...
ABANDONED HORSERACING COURSE IN EXPOSITION PART (OLYMPIC PARK) PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF THE             LOS ANGELES MEMORI...
O r g a n i z a t i o n   o f   t h e   G a m e s                         PERISTYLE AND EXCAVATION FOR STADIUM BOWL, 1922a...
X t h   O l y m p i a d   L o s   A n g e l e s   1 9 3 2                             THE STADIUM TAKES FORMsojourn with h...
Organization of the Gameswas informed that although the Games of the VIIIth Olympiad (Paris, 1924) hadbeen definitely awar...
X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2and enthusiastically gave a rising vote of endorsement to the suggestion....
X t h    O l y m p i a d   L o s    A n g e l e s   1 9 3 2        The California Olympiad Bond Act of 1927 involved an am...
Organization of the Gamesrequirements in respect to active preparations, and the innumerable important de-tails, constitut...
X t h O l y m p i a d o f A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2      In the spring of 1928 the General Secretary instituted a campaign to ...
FACSIMILE OF OFFICIAL INVITATION SENT TO ALL NATIONS
X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2                                                 In the election of Novem...
Organization of the Games 1932      It was necessary that the Olympic Committees in all countries should bebrought as clos...
X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2      to this procedure, the State Department at Washington transmitted a...
O r g a n i z a t i o n   o f   t h e   G a m e sLos Angeles, together with the tentative programme and arrangement of eve...
X t h    O l y m p i a d   L o s   A n g e l e s   1 9 3 2fulfillment of one of the most fundamental ideas or ideals incor...
O r g a n i z a t i o n   o f   t h e    G a m e s tion, filling one position after another as the months elapsed and the ...
X th Olym pi ad L os A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2        The Control Committee met regularly, throughout the period of intensive ...
Organization of the Games appointment of an Attaché, native to that country but resident in Los Angeles, and acquainted wi...
Management of the Games                                  THE ORGANIZING COMMITTEE                                       Co...
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932
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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932

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Why were the 1932 Olympics the first Olympic Games to create a profit? And how was this done at the peak of the Great Depression?

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The Official Report of the Games of the Xth Olympiad Los Angeles, 1932

  1. 1. Official Report Published by theX TH O LYMPIADE C OMMITTEE OF THE GAMES OF LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 1932, LTD.
  2. 2. COPYRIGHT, 1933 XTH OLYMPIADE COMMITTEE OF THE GAMES OF LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 1932, LTD. Printed byWOLFER PRINTING COMPANY, INC. Los Angeles, California Printed and Bound in U. S. A.
  3. 3. DedicatedTo the Principles and Ideals of Modern Olympism
  4. 4. ForewordT HE ORGANIZING COMMITTEE of the Games of the Xt h Olympiad fulfils its final obligation by presenting this Official Report of its organization of the Games . To allow an event of such perma-nent interest to remain only in the memories of participants and observerswould be to impair the achievement; and it is therefore wise that the prepa-ration and circulation of a permanent record are prescribed as part ofthe work of the Committee in connection with the Games. The Committee takes pleasure in the performance of this duty, andin presenting the result to the International Olympic Committee, theNationa1 Olympic Committees, the International Sports Federations, and tothe State of California, whose people bonded themselves for the supportof the Games. To all these the Committee expresses its gratitude for help-ful co-operation. In order that the combined magnitude and beauty of the Games of1932 may be faithfully represented, it is necessary that the Report be com-prehensive and pictorial; and in order that the experience gained in theorganization of these Games may be of value hereafter, it is necessary thatthe Report be particular. It has been the purpose of the Committee toomit nothing which is pertinent and to add nothing which is superfluous.It ventures the hope that the Report may be found to approach as nearlyas possible the ideal thus proposed. Xth Olympiade Committee of the Games of Los Angeles, U.S.A. 1932, Ltd.
  5. 5. Honorable Herbert Hoover PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICAHONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE GAMES OF THE XTH OLYMPIAD
  6. 6. Founding of the Modern GamesT HE revival of the modern Olympic Games, the first of which were celebrated in Athens, in 1896, was due to the idealism and enterprise of Baron Pierre de Coubertin, who forsook a political career to devote his energies to the introductionof sport into the educational life of the youth of his native country, France. To this end,he traveled widely in America and England to study the organization of sport and itsimportance in the activities of the people of those countries. It was in 1892 that he first propounded his desire for a new era in international sport.At a meeting that year of the Union des Sports Athletiques in France, he made his firstpublic announcement as follows : “Let us export our oarsmen, our runners, our fencers, into other lands. That is thetrue Free Trade of the future; and the day it is introduced into Europe the cause of Peacewill have received a new and strong ally. It inspires me to touch upon the further step Inow propose, and in it I shall ask that the help you have given me hitherto you will extendagain, so that together we may attempt to realize, upon a basis suitable to the conditions ofour modern life, the splendid and beneficent task of reviving the Olympic Games.” For a time there was no perceptible result, but two years later, a circular to all AthleticAssociations, pointing out “the necessity to preserve in sport those characteristics of nobilityand chivalry which have distinguished it in the past, so that it may continue to play the samepart in the education of the peoples of today as it played so admirably in the days of AncientGreece,” brought together in the Amphitheatre of the Sorbonne, in June, 1894, enoughdelegates from various countries to organize the International Olympic Committee. At thismeeting Baron de Coubertin proposed that the first Games of the new era be celebrated inAthens, which met with the unanimous approval of the newly-formed Committee, thuslaunching the series of Modern Olympiads the Xth of which was celebrated in Los Angeles.
  7. 7. Baron Pierre de CoubertinFOUNDER AND LIFE HONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES
  8. 8. By Baron Pierre de Coubertin, Founder of Modern Olympism" HE main issue in life is not the victory but the fight ; the essential is not to have won but to have fought well. To spread these pre-cepts is to pave the way for a more valiant humanity, stronger, and con-sequently more scrupulous and more generous. These words extendacross whole domains and form the basis of a healthy and happy philosophy. “The Olympic movement gives the world an ideal which reckons withthe reality of life, and includes a possibility to guide this reality toward thegreat Olympic Idea : ‘Joie des muscles, culte de la beauté, travail pour leservice de la famille et de la société ; ces trois éléments unis en un faisceauindissoluble.’ “May joy and good fellowship reign, and in this manner, may theOlympic Torch pursue its way through the ages, increasing friendly under-standing among nations, for the good of a humanity always more enthu-siastic, more courageous and more pure.”
  9. 9. Count de Baillet-LatourPRESIDENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE
  10. 10. Count de Baillet-Latour Organizer of the Modern Games I PROMISED at Prague to discuss this matter and I keep my word so that hence- forth no one can ignore it.” ” The speaker was Count de Baillet-Latour, and the meeting referred to was the Olympic Congress held in Prague in 1925, at whichtime he was elected President of the International Olympic Committee. The quoted words constitute the opening paragraph of a remarkable document bythe hand and over the signature of Count de Baillet-Latour, a pronouncement which makesits author and modern Olympic history inseparable, because it marked the beginning ofthe first orderly arrangement and organic control of the Olympic movement throughoutthe world. In a few hundred words, simply phrased but thoughtfully constructed, embracing allof the fundamentals, this document has provided the foundation for what may properlybe termed the Constitution and Laws governing modern Olympism. By its tenets are theOlympic Games organized and administered . Under its sound principles will the idealsand purposes of the Games be fostered and protected for the future. If the written wordis fated to survive the human frailties, then this document and the Games will live as dothe stones of the mountains. Count de Baillet-Latour, President of the International Olympic Committee, carriesa great weight of responsibility and personifies the self-sacrifice and unselfish devotion tothe Olympic principles manifested by all members of the International Olympic Committee,the many National Olympic Committees , the International Sports Federations and theOrganizing Committees, on the administrative side of the Olympic movement, and of theathletes and other entrants on the competitive side of the movement.
  11. 11. The Olympic StructureT HE INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTE E is the central world-governing body to the extent that it “"directs the rules of the Games, draws up the general programme and decides the qualifications of the amateur athletes chosen to takepart ; settles the place where each Olympiad is to be celebrated, its Executive Committeeconstituting the Jury of Honor during the Games. "” In each Olympic country there is a National Olympic Committee which joins theSports Associations of that country in qualifying its competitors for the Games.These committees enforce the decisions of the Jury of Honor and organize the financing,transport, housing, and general management of the teams. The National Olympic Com-mittee of a country also has the responsibility, when the Games are awarded to its country,of providing the facilities and of organizing and managing the Games (except for technicaladministration) or it may delegate its duties and authorities so to do to a special Organiz-ing Committee, which shall thereupon assume these responsibilities, thus eliminating theNational Olympic Committee from such matters. Each of the authorized Olympic sports is governed by an International Federation.These Federations have branches for their sport in all Olympic countries, and they makethe rules for their sport (in keeping with the amateur definition as prescribed by the Inter-national Olympic Committee), decide the programme of their sport jointly with the Execu-tive Committee of the International Olympic Committee, control all sports equipment, andadminister the technical side of the events, appoint the Ground Judges (officials) and theJudges of Appeal, and deal finally with all complaints. Thus, we have the International Olympic Committee surrounded by the NationalOlympic Committees and the International Sports Federations, the three groups constitutingthe self-perpetuating structure of world-wide control of the Olympic movement. Thesegroups meet periodically in what is known as the Olympic Congress to settle questions putin the Agenda by the International Olympic Committee for improvement of the procedures.These Congresses afford the opportunity of hearing from the Organizing Committee of thecountry in which the Games are being held as to the adequacy of its plans and preparations. The Olympic Congresses, by means of their representatives among the nations, incollaboration with the National Olympic Committees, strive to play their part by urgingin every possible way the physical development of youth and the culture of sport, so thatrespective discipline and the spirit of sportsmanship will lead to peace, unity and happinessamong the different groups, as among the different peoples.
  12. 12. International Olympic Committee FOUNDER . . . . . . . BARON PIERRE DE COUBERTIN LIFE HONORARY PRESIDENT OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES PRESIDENT . . . . . . COUNT DE BAILLET-LATOUR SECRETARY . . . . . . . . COLONEL A. G. BERDEZ ARGENTINE ESTONIA LATVIA M. de Alvear Dr. F. Akel Janis Dikmanis R.C. Aldao FINLAND MEXICO AUSTRALIA Ernst Krogius Dr. M. Saenz R. Coombes FRANCE MONACO James Taylor E. Albert Glandaz Count Gautier-Vignal AUSTRIA Marquis de Polignac NEW ZEALAND Dr. Theodore Schmidt Count Clary Cecil J. Wray GERMANY BELGIUM NORWAY Dr. Theodor Lewald Count de Baillet-Latour Thomas Fearnley (Pres. I.O.C.) Duke Adolf Fridrich Von Baron de Laveleye Mecklenburg-Schwerin PERU Dr. Karl Ritter von Halt Alfredo Benavides BRAZIL GREAT BRITAIN POLAND R. de Rio Branco Arnaldo Guinle Brigadier General R. Kentish Ignace Matuszewski Dr. Ferreira Santos Lord Rochdale Dr. Stanislaw Rouppert Lord Aberdare BULGARIA PORTUGAL GREECE Count de Penha-GarciaStephan G. Tchaprachikov N. Politis ROUMANIA CANADA HOLLAND Georges A. Plagino James G. Merrick Lt. Col. P. W. ScharrooSir George McLaren Brown Baron A. Schimmelpenninck SOUTH AFRICA van der Oye Lt. Col. Henry Nourse CENTRAL AMERICA Pedro Jaime de Matheu HUNGARY SPAIN Count Géza Andrássy Baron de Güell CHILE Senator Jules De Muzsa Count de Vallellano Alfredo Ewing INDIA SWEDEN CHINA G. D. Sondhi, M. A., I.E.S. Count Clarence von Rosen Dr. C. T. Wang J. Sifrid Edström IRELAND CUBA J. J. Keane SWITZERLAND Porfirio Franca Baron Godefroy de Blonay ITALY CZECHOSLOVAKIA General Carlo Montù TURKEYCounsellor Dr. Jiri Count Bonacossa Kemaleddin Sami Pacha Jarkovsky JAPAN UNITED STATES DENMARK Prof. Jigoro Kano William May Garland H. R. H. Prince Axel of Dr. S. Kishsi General Charles H. Sherrill Denmark Ernest Lee Jahncke JUGOSLAVIA EGYPT General S.S. Djoukitsch URUGUAY Angelo C. Bolanachi Prof. Dr. Franjo Dr. F. Ghigliani
  13. 13. R. C. ALDAO R. COOMBES JAMES TAYLOR DR. THEODORE SCHMIDT COUNT DE BAILLET-LATOUR Member for Argentine Member for Australia Member for Australia M e m b e r f o r A u s t r ia President And Member for Belgium PEDRO JAIME DE MATHEU DR. C. T. WANG PORFIRO FRANCA COUNSELLOR DR. JIRI GUTH- ANGELO C. BOLANACHIMember for Central America Member for China Member for Cuba JARKOVSKY Member for Egypt Member for CzechoslovakiaDUKE ADOLF FRIEDRICH VON LORD ABERDARE N. POLITIS LT. COL. P.W. SCHARROO DR. KARL RITTER VON HALTMECKLENBURG-SCHWERIN Member for Great Britain M e m b e r f o r G r e e ce Member for Holland Member for Germany Member for Germany COUNT BONACOSSA PROF. JIGORO KANO DR. S. KISHI PROF. DR. FRANJO BUCAR JANIS DIKMANIS Member for Italy Member for Japan Member for Japan Member for Jugoslavia Member for Latvia LT. COL. HENRY NOURSE BARON DE GÜELL COUNT DE VALLELLANO COUNT CLARENCE VON ROSEN J. SIGFRID EDSTRÖM Member for South Africa Member for S p a in Member for S p a in Member for Sweden Member for Sweden International Olympic Committee
  14. 14. BARON DE LAVELEYE ARNALDO GUINLE DR. FERREIRA SANTOS JAMES G. MERRICK SIR GEORGE MCLAREN BROWN Member for Belgium Member for Brazil Member for Brazil Member for Canada Member for Canada ERNST KROGIUS E. ALBERT GLANDAZ MARQUIS DE POLIGNAC DR. THEODOR LEWALD COUNT CLARY Member for Finland Member for France Member for France Member for Germany Member for France BARON A. SCHIMMELPENNINCK COUNT GÉZA ANDRÁSSY SENATOR JULES DE MUZSA G. D. SONDHI, M.A., I.E.S. GENERAL CARLO MONTÙ VAN DER OYE Member for Hungary Member for Hungary Member for India Member for Italy Member for Holland CECIL J. WRAY THOMAS FEARNLEY IGNACE MATUSZEWSKI DR. STANISLAW ROUPPERT COUNT DE PENHA-GARCIAMember for New Zealand M e m b e r f o r N o r w ay M e m b e r f o r P o l a nd Member for Portugal M e m b e r f o r P o l a ndBARON GODEFROY DE BLONAY KEMALEDDIN SAMI PACHA WILLIAM MAY GARLAND GENERAL CHARLES H. SHERRILL ERNEST LEE, JAHNCKE Member for Switzerland M e m b e r f o r T u r k ey Member for United States Member for United States M e m b e r f o r U n i t e d S t a t es International Olympic Committee
  15. 15. National Olympic Committees ARGENTINE GERMANY MEXICOHoracio Bustos Morón (h) Dr. Theodore Lewald, President Brig. General Tirso Hernández President Dr. Carl Diem, General Secretary PresidentCarmelo Calarco, Secretary Alfonso Rojo de la Vega, GREAT BRITAIN Secretary AUSTRALIA His Grace the Duke ofJames Taylor, President Sutherland, K.T., President MONACOJames S. W. Eve, Sir Harold Bowden, Bt., G.B.E., Charles Bellando de Castro, Honorary Secretary Chairman British Olympic Council President Evan A. Hunter, O.B.E., Prévert Dominique AUSTRIA General Secretary Honorary SecretaryDr. Theodore Schmidt, PresidentDirector Hans Pfeiffer, GREECE NEW ZEALAND General Secretary Jean Drossopoulos, President Rt. Hon. G. W. Forbes, President BELGIUM Michel Rinopoulos, H. McCormick, L.L.B., General Secretory Honorary SecretaryCount de Baillet-Latour, PresidentAlfred Verdyck, General Secretary GUATEMALA NORWAY BOLIVIA Miguel Ravela, Secretary Major Jörgen Jensen, PresidentUlysses Saucedo, Director of Sports HAITI Captain Helge Lövland (No Official Committee) General Secretary André Chevallier, President BRAZIL PERU HOLLANDArnaldo Guinle, President Alfredo Larrañaga, President Baron A. Schimmelpenninck J. Victor Eguiguren, Secretory BULGARIA van der Oye, PresidentGénéral de la Reserve V. Major George van Rossem, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS Lasaroff, President General Secretary Manuel L. Quezon, PresidentDr. Theodore Suboff, Dr. Regino R. Ylanan, General Secretary HUNGARY General Secretary Senator Jules de Muzsa, Chairman CANADA Dr. Andrew Lázár, President POLANDP. J. Mulqueen, President Dr. Nicholas Mártonffy, Secretary Lt. Col. Kazimierz Glabisz,M. M. Robinson, President Honorary Secretary ICELAND Wincenty Forys, General Secretary CHILE Ben G. Waage, President Kjartan Thorvardsson, Secretary PORTUGALRichard Müller Hess, PresidentAbraham Ortega, General Secretary INDIA Dr. José J. F. Pontes, President F. Nobre Guedes, General Secretary CHINA Major General His Highness SirDr. C. T. Wang, President Bhupindera Singh Mohinder ROUMANIA Bahadur, PresidentWm. Z. L. Sung, Dinu Cesiano, General Secretary Honorary General Secretary G. D. Sondhi, M.A., I.E.S., Honorary Secretary SOUTH AFRICA COLOMBIA IRELAND Lt. Col. Henry Nourse;Dr. F. Henriquez, President Life President General E. ODuffy, President CUBA Captain H. Cannon, A. V. Lindbergh, ChairmanBrigadier W. I. Consuegra, Honorary Secretary Ira G. Emery, General Secretary President ITALY SPAIN CZECHOSLOVAKIA Leandro Arpinati, President Marquis De Lamadrid, PresidentDr. Joe Gruss, President Prof. Cesare Grattarola, J. Mesalles Estivill, SecretaryDr. František Widimský, General Secretary General Secretary SWEDEN DENMARK JAPAN Gustaf Adolf, the Crown PrinceRear Admiral Carl Carstensen, Dr. S. Kishi, President of Sweden, President President Fumio Takashima, Captain Tor Wibom,Peter Jaeger, Honorary Secretary Honorary Secretary General Secretary ECUADOR JUGOSLAVIA SWITZERLANDCarlos Manrique Izquieta, Dr. Stevan Hadzi, President William Hirschy, President President Miroslav Dobrin, Dr. F. M. Messerli, EGYPT Honorary Secretary General SecretaryH. H. Prince Omar Tousson, LATVIA President TURKEYAngelo C. Bolanachi, Secretary Janis Dikmanis, President Kemaleddin Sami Pacha, President Pauls Polis, General Secretary Captain Ekrem Rüstü Bey, ESTONIA Honorary General SecretaryDr. F. Akel, President LITHUANIAA. Anderkopp, General Secretary J. Vileišis, President UNITED STATES FINLAND J. Treinys, Honorary Secretary Dr. Graeme M. Hammond,Ernst Krogius, President President Emeritus LUXEMBOURG Avery Brundage, PresidentJ. O. Söderhjelm, Secretary Gustave Jaquemart, President Frederick W. Rubien, Secretary FRANCE Nicholas Schmit, General Secretary Count Clary, President URUGUAY Marcel Delabre, General Secretary MALTA Dr. F. Ghigliani, President Charles Denis, Secretary P. Giorgio, General Secretary Alfredo L . Laens, Secretary
  16. 16. HORACIO BUSTOS MORÓN (h) CARMELO CALARCO JAMES TAYLOR JAMES S. W. EVE DR. THEODORE SCHMIDT Pres. Argentine Olympic Sec. Argentine Olympic Pres. Australian Olympic Hon. Sec. Australian Olympic Pres. Austrian Olympic Committee Commitee Federation Federation Committee COUNT DE BAILLET-LATOUR ALFRED VERDYCK ARNALDO GUINLE P. J. MULQUEEN DR. C. T. WANG Pres. Belgian Olympic Gen. Sec. Belgian Olympic Pres. Brazilian Olympic Pres. Canadian Olympic Pres. China National Amateur Committee Committee Committee Committee Athletic Federation WM. Z. L. SUNG DR. JOE GRUSS DR. FRANTIŠEK WIDIMSKÝ REAR ADMIRAL CARL CARSTENSEN PETER JAEGER Hon. Gen. Sec. China Nat. Pres. Czechoslovakian Olympic Gen. Sec. Czechoslovakian Pres. Danish Olympic Hon. Sec. Danish OlympicAmateur Athletic Federation Committee Olympic Committee Committee Committee CARLOS MANRIQUE IZQUIETA ANGELO C. BOLANACHI A. ANDERKOPP J.O. SÖDERHJELM ERNST KROGIUS Pres. Olympic Committee of Sec. Egyptian Olympic Gen. Sec. Estonian Olympic Pres. Finnish Olympic Sec. Finnish Olympic Ecuador Committee Committee Committee Committee COUNT CLARY HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF MARCEL DELARBRE DR. THEODORE LEWALD DR. CARL DIEM SUTHERLAND, K.T. Pres. French Olympic Gen. Sec. French Olympic Pres. German Olympic Gen. Sec. German Olympic Committee Pres. British Olympic Committee Committee Committee Association National Olympic Committees
  17. 17. SIR HAROLD BOWDEN, Bt., G.B.E. EVAN A. HUNTER, O.B.E. JEAN DROSSOPOULOS MICHEL RINOPOULOS BARON A. SCHIMMELPENNlNCK Chairman British Olympic Hon. Sec. British Olympic Pres. Grecian Olympic Gen. Sec. Grecian Olympic VAN DER OYE Council Association Committee Committee Pres. Netherlands Olympic ComMAJOR GEORGE VAN ROSSEM SENATOR JULES DE MUZSA DR. ANDREW LÁZÁR DR. NICHOLAS MÁRTONFFY MAJ. GEN. H. H. SIR Gen. Sec. Netherlands Chairman Hungarian Olympic Pres. Hungarian Olympic Sec. Hungarian Olympic BHUPINDERA SINGH MOHlNDER Olympic Committee Committee Committee BAHADUR, Pres. Indian Ol. Assn Committee G.D. SONDHI, M.A., I.E.S. GENERAL E. ODUFFY CAPTAIN H. CANNON LEANDRO ARPINATI PROF. CESARE GRATTAROLA Hon. Sec. Indian Olympic Pres. Irish Olympic Council Hon. Sec. Irish Olympic Pres. Italian Olympic Gen. Sec. Italian Olympic Association Council Committee Committee DR. S. KISHI FUMIO TAKASHIMA DR. STEVAN HADZI MIROSLAV DOBRIN JANIS DIKMANIS Pres. Japanese Amateur Hon. Sec. Japanese Amateur Pres. Jugoslav Olympic Hon. Sec. Jugoslav Pres. Latvian Olympic Athletic Federation Athletic Federation Committee Olympic Committee Committee PAULS POLIS J. VILEIŠIS J. TREINYS GUSTAVE JACQUEMART NICHOLAS SCHMIT Gen. Sec. Latvian Olympic Pres. Central Committee of Hon. Sec. Central Committee Pres. Olympic Committee of Gen. Sec. Olympic Committee Committee Lithuanian Sport League of Lithuanian Sport League Luxembourg of Luxembourg National Olympic Committees
  18. 18. BRIG. GEN. TlRSO HERNÁNDEZ ALFONSO ROJO DE LA VEGA RT. HON. G. W. FORBES H. McCORMICK, LL.B. MAJOR JÖRGEN JENSEN Pres. Mexican Olympic S e c . M e x i c a n O l y m p ic Pres. New Zealand Olympic H o n . S e c . N e w Z e a l a nd Pres. Norwegian Olympic Committee Committee Association Olympic Association Committee CAPTAIN HELGE LÖVLAND DR. REGINO R. YLANAN LT. COL. KAZIMIERZ GLABISZ WlNCENTY FORYS DR. JOSÉ J. F. PONTES Gen. Sec. Norwegian Olympic Gen. Sec. Philippine Amateur P r e s . P o l i s h O l y m p ic Gen. Sec. Polish Olympic Pres. Olympic Committee Committee Athletic Federation Committee Committee of Portugal F. NOBRE GUEDES LT. COL. HENRY NOURSE A. V. LINDBERGH IRA G. EMERY MARQUIS DE LAMADRID Gen. Sec. Olympic Committee L i f e P r e s . S o u t h A f r i c an Chairman South African Gen. Sec. South African P r e s . S p a n i s h O l y m p ic of Portugal Olympic Games Association Olympic Games Association Olympic Games Association Committee J. MESALLES ESTIVILL GUSTAF ADOLF, THE CROWN CAPTAIN TOR WIBOM WILLIAM HIRSCHY DR. F. M. MESSERLI S e c . S p a n i s h O l y m p ic PRINCE OF SWEDEN Gen. Sec. Swedish Olympic Pres. Swiss Olympic G e n . S e c . S w i s s O l y m p ic Committee Pres. Swedish Olympic Com. Committee Committee Committee KEMALEDDIN SAMI PACHA CAPTAIN EKREM RÜSTÜ BEY DR. GRAEME M. HAMMOND AVERY BRUNDAGE FREDERICK W. RUBIEN Pres. Turkish Olympic Hon. Gen. Sec. Turkish Pres. Emeritus American Pres. American Olympic Sec. American Olympic Committee Oly mpic Co mmittee Olympic Association Committee Committee National Olympic Committees
  19. 19. International Sports FederationsINTERNATIONAL ATHLETIC FEDERATION INTERNATIONAL MODERN PENTATHLON J. SIGFRID EDSTRÖM, President FEDERATION Bo EKELUND , Honorary Secretary COUNT DE BAILLET-LATOUR, President CAPTAIN TOR WIBOM , Honorary SecretaryINTERNATIONAL BOXING FEDERATION OSCAR SÖDERLUND , President INTERNATIONAL ROWING FEDERATION VAL BARKER, Honorary Secretary RICO FIORONI, President GASTON MÜLLEGG , Honorary SecretaryINTERNATIONAL CYCLING FEDERATION LÉON BRETON, President INTERNATIONAL SHOOTING FEDERATION PAUL ROUSSEAU , General Secretary JEAN CARNOT, President ANDRÉ PARMENTIER, SecretaryINTERNATIONAL EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION MAJOR GENERAL GUY V. HENRY , President INTERNATIONAL SWIMMING FEDERATION COMMANDANT GEORGES HECTOR , E. G. DRIGNY , President General Secretary DR. LEO DONÁTH , Honorary SecretaryINTERNATIONAL FENCING FEDERATION INTERNATIONAL WEIGHTLIFTING Eugène M. EMPEYTA , President FEDERATION ANTOINE ALBERT, General Secretary JULES ROSSET , President A. BOURDONNAY -SCHWEICH , General SecretaryINTERNATIONAL GYMNASTIC FEDERATION CHARLES CAZALET, President INTERNATIONAL WRESTLING FEDERATION J. DALBANNE, Secretary V. SMEDS , President PERCY LONGHURST , Honorary SecretaryINTERNATIONAL HOCKEY FEDERATION M. CSILLAG , Honorary Secretary, ALBERT DEMAUREX , Secretary Greco-Roman Section INTERNATIONAL YACHTING FEDERATION MAJOR B. HECKSTALL -SMITH, Secretary Olympic Attachés ARGENTINE ESTONIA JUGOSLAVIA Dr. Henry C. Niese Charles E. Kodil Michael Rokich AUSTRALIA FRANCE LATVIA Reginald L. Baker Robert D. Farquhar H. P. Rising AUSTRIA FINLAND MEXICO Frederick Oskar Martin Runar Ohls Enrique Mexia M. BELGIUM GERMANY NEW ZEALANDCount Franç ois de Buisseret Dr. W. Rammelt C. George Krogness BRAZIL GREAT BRITAIN NORWAY J. M. Sheridan Henry Young Dr. Albert Soiland CHILE GREECE POLAND Arturo Rios Talavera George Smainis John Roman CHINA GUATEMALA PORTUGAL Snowpine Liu John E. Rodriguez A. George Simas COLOMBIA HAITI SOUTH AFRICA Dr. Luis A. Marino Colonel Arthur T. Marix C. Forbes Ridland COSTA RICA HOLLAND SPAIN C. E. Bobertz Adrian Hartog Marquis Villa Alcazar CUBA HUNGARY SWEDEN Dr. J. A. Torralbas Francis Proiszl G.W. Olson CZECHOSLOVAKIA INDIA SWITZERLAND Dr. Felix B. Janovsky Lal Chand Mehra Hans W. Schneider DENMARK ITALY URUGUAY Ryan A. Grut Joseph E. Pagliano, Jr. Robert E. Tracey EGYPT JAPAN VENEZUELA Curtis V. Crellin Dr. Ken Nakazawa Pedro J. de Larralde
  20. 20. J. SIGFRID EDSTRÖM BO EKELUND OSCAR SÖDERLUND VAL BARKER LÉON BRETON Pres. International Athletic Hon. Sec. International Pres. International Boxing Hon. Sec. International Pres. International Cycling Federation Athletic Federation Federation Boxing Federation Federation PAUL ROUSSEAU MAJOR GENERAL GUY V. HENRY COMMANDANT GEORGES HECTOR EUGÈNE M. EMPEYTA ANTOINE ALBERTGcn. Sec. International Pres. International Equestrian Gen. Sec. International Pres. International Fencing Gen. Sec. International Cycling Federation Federation Equestrian Federation Federation Fencing Federation CHARLES CAZALET COUNT DE BAILLET-LATOUR CAPTAIN TOR WIBOM RICO FIORONI GASTON MÜLLEGGPres. International Gymnastic Pres. International Modern Hon. Sec. International Pres. International Rowing Hon. Sec. International Federation Pentathlon Federation Modern Pentathlon Federation Federation Rowing Federation ANDRÉ PARMENTIER E. G. DRIGNY DR. LEO DONÁTH JULES ROSSET JEAN CARNOT Sec. International Shooting Pres. International Swimming Hon. Sec. International Pres. International Weight- Pres. International Shooting Federation Federation Federation Swimming Federation lifting Federation A. BOURDONNAY-SCHWEICH V. SMEDS PERCY LONGHURST M. CSILLAG MAJOR B. HECKSTALL-SMITH Gen. Sec. International Pres. International Wrestling Hon. Sec. International Hon. Sec. Greco-Roman Sec. International Yachting Weightlifting Federation Federation Wrestling Federation Section Intcrnational Federation Wrestling Federation International Sports Federations
  21. 21. HERBERT HOOVER BARON PIERRE DE COUBERTIN President of the United States Founder and Life Honorary President of America of the Olympic Games HONORARY PRESIDENTS CHARLES CURTIS JOHN N. GARNER CHARLES EVANS HUGHES Vice-President of the United States Speaker of the House of RepresentativesChief Justice, Supreme Court of the United States of America of America HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS JAMES ROLPH, JR. HENRY W. WRIGHT JOHN C. PORTER Governor of the State of California Mayor of the City of Los Angeles Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, County of Los Angeles HONORARY MEMBERS Honorary Committee
  22. 22. WILLIAM MAY GARLAND WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY PresidentLOUIS B. MAYER MALCOLM MCNAGHTEN JOHN C. PORTER JOHN W. MALTMAN WARREN B. BOVARD Legal Counsel (In Memoriam 1930) California Olympiad Commission
  23. 23. The Organizing Committee of the Games of the Xth Olympiad RUSSELL H. BALLARDE. MANCHESTER BODDY WILLIAM A. BOWEN FREDERICK W. BRAUN H. B. R. BRIGGS HERBERT FLEISHHACKER WILLIAM MAY GARLAND R. B. HALE D. A. HAMBURGER President MAYNARD McFIE HENRY S. MCKEE HENRY M. ROBINSON LEROY SANDERS Vice-President Vice-President
  24. 24. HARRY J. BAUER FRANK J. BELCHER, JR. ARTHUR S. BENTDR. FRANK F. BARHAM Treasurer HARRY CHANDLER EDWARD A. DICKSON ZACK J. FARMER A. M. CHAFFEY Secretary FRED W. KIESEL HENRY S. MACKAY, JR. DR. ROBERT A. MILLIKANWILLIAM F. HUMPHREY Vice-President PAUL SHOUP C. C. TEAGUE WALTER K. TULLER G. G. YOUNG
  25. 25. T h e G a m e s o f t h e X t h O l y m p i a d The Games of the Xth OlympiadT HE GAMES of the Xth Olympiad have come and gone. They are now a page of history. To us who were participants in their activities, their memories are still very real and vivid, memories of a splendid spectacle,splendidly staged, splendidly acted. But in a very short while these memories will lose their sharpness. They willbe softened, and as time passes they will gradually become merged into a recol-lection almost dreamlike, as of a ship that passes in the night. And as this dream-like picture recurs to us in future times, proudly shall we participants recall ourparticipation and as proudly shall we say, “Of all this was I a part.” This volume is prepared by, and primarily for, the participants in this quad-rennial celebration of the modern prototype of the ancient Grecian festival. Theseare not alone the young men and young women who actually competed in theevents. Among the participants in the Olympiad are the members of the NationalOlympic Committee of each entered country, the representatives of the Interna-tional Federations governing the technical administration of the fourteen Sports,the members of the International Olympic Committee, which is the central world-governing body of modern Olympism , and the Organizing Committee with itsmanagerial personnel. These are the members of the modern Olympic family, whose influence isspreading over the five continents and affectin g the sentiments of millions. Notall the members of the named groups could be here for the celebration of the Gamesbut all had their share in bringing about the celebration. Forty nations actuallysent their representatives, to sustain the flame of the Olympic Torch and to carveagain in imperishable form the inspiring Olympic doctrine of good sportsmanshipand peace and better understanding among the peoples of the earth. To us the matter is one of reverential sentiment. We make this statementwithout fear of those who may scoff at such an idea in this materialistic age. Senti-ment, moulded from the finest of human emotions, rests at the very foundationof the Olympic movement. Sentiment achieved the glorious success of the Gamesof the Xth Olympiad. Sentiment sustained the whole Olympic family in carryingon, in a period of world-wide economic depression and political strife, and evenat the cost of extreme self-sacrifice, in the determination to make the Games ofthe Xth Olympiad an outstanding success. 29
  26. 26. X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2 It must be remembered that the Olympic movement has no form of establishedfinancial subsidy. The talents of competitors, the labor of officials, and the effortsof all are given without hope of reward other than the honor which they may bringto their country, to their sport, and to themselves. The story of the success of the Games of the Xth Olympiad is carved in thedepths of a dark abyss of world depression. But the spirit of Olympism has illum-inated that abyss, and those who came to the Games from all the far corners ofthe earth have taken home with them something of a new hope engendered by afiner understanding of and a more intimate friendship for their fellow man, regard-less of race or creed. We who are writing this chronicle are members of the Organizing Committeein the city in which the Games were held. It is natural that we should be proudof the credit that has come to our Country, to our State and to our City from thesuccess of this great international event. It is our purpose here, however, torecord the simple but important fact that our own efforts amount to but a smallpart of the whole story. With vision and pardonable ambition, Los Angeles sought the award of theGames, by the International Olympic Committee, twelve years before the year ofthe Xth Olympiad. The city’s request was granted three years later. The childof modern Olympism was born in Europe, and nourished there by the leadingOlympic countries, whose ministrations to the well-being and growth of the childcould more easily be applied until it should have that strength. that comes withmaturity. Our hope to secure the Games was not more audacious than was thecourageous decision of the young Olympic giant to leave the regions with whichhe had become so familiar and to travel great distances to a new Olympia. With the award of the Games to a city on the far western shore of the NorthAmerican Continent, at the very border of the waters of the Pacific, the Olympicfamily undertook an effort that was destined to tax its spirit to the utmost. LosAngeles fully understood and deeply appreciated this fact, and prepared to do herpart in such a manner as to merit the confidence that had been shown. The record of our city’s conception of its responsibility, and of its prepara-tions from beginning to end, discloses one fundamental and guiding principle,which was to adhere strictly to the Olympic ideals and to make such contributionsin its organization of the Games as would strengthen and perpetuate those ideals.Not a single note of commercialism was allowed to permeate the consummationof the task. In the years 1930 and 1931, when the ugly head of depression loomed upbefore the eyes of all, Los Angeles could have retrenched in her broad programme30
  27. 27. 776 B. C.—1932 A. D.:—THE GREAT SEQUOIASTHE REDWOOD TREES OF CALIFORNIA ARE THE ONLY LIVING THINGS WHICH WERE ALIVE IN THE DAYS OF THE ANCIENT OLYMPIC GAMES
  28. 28. T h e G a m e s o f t h e X t h O l y m p i a dof preparations, without neglecting any of her specific Olympic obligations. It wasdetermined, however, that preparations should continue as scheduled, to the endthat everything should be as nearly perfect as possible for the celebration of theGames, even though general participation of the nations was doubtful and liberalpatronage by a financially depressed public hardly to be expected. These things are frankly stated as a testimonial to the Olympic spirit and anexplanation of what it did for our city . We were inspired by the confidence theOlympic nations had placed in us and we knew intimately, day by day, the greatstruggles being made by the Olympic organizations throughout the world to honorour city by their presence and their participation. What insufferable ingrates we should have been to conceive our responsibilityother than we did. That, perhaps, is th e great beauty of it all, the inspiration thatcomes to individuals, organizations , cities and entire peoples, who once have adefinite contact with the principles and ideals of Olympism. One and all have been kind enough to bestow great praise upon Los Angelesfor her complete and thoughtful preparations for the Games and for their admin-istration. That is all deeply appreciated but, after all, does it mean so much afterone has sat in the stand and watched a youth who has been for years preparingbody and mind at great self-sacrifice, who has yielded his annual holidays forseveral years in order to obtain a leave of ten weeks’ absence from his employment,who has parted from friends and family and traveled half way round the world,carrying in his heart the honor of his country — to see this boy at the end of it allcome struggling down the track, givin g the utmost that is in him, and facingdefeat with a smile. Such boys challenge the spirit and soul of any city or nation and that chal-lenge well met is certainly none too much as a return. When, in the Opening Ceremony of the Games, the Parade of Nations camedown the track, until some two thousand participants from forty different countrieshad received the acclaim of the tumultuous crowd, few among the spectators knewthe story of self-sacrifice that lay behind that scene. By their presence within her walls Los Angeles has been honored as havefew cities, and this honor was accentuated by the condition of the times in whichthe event occurred. Therefore, Los Angeles desires here and now to record herdeep appreciation of the distinction thus conferred upon her, and in this we feelthat we are expressing also the sentiments of the people of the State of Californiaand of the United States of America. 31
  29. 29. “ THE OLYMPIC CITY ”
  30. 30. O r g a n i z a t i o n o f t h e G a m e s Organization of the Games of the Xth OlympiadI T IS the desire of governing Olympic bodies that this Report be a chronicle of the entire history of the organization of the Games of the Xth Olympiad. We shall therefore confine ourselves to the facts and take no editorial license otherthan endeavor to arrange the facts in narrative form, as interestingly as possible,continuing to serve the principal objective, which is to be informative. The Olympic Protocol provides for what is known as the Organizing Com-mittee, to which is given full responsibility for the organization and general admin-istration of each celebration of the Games . In the Los Angeles Games, the XthOlympiade Committee of the Games of Los Angeles U. S. A. 1932 Ltd. was theOrganizing Committee. The entire Olympic family has become well acquaintedwith this organization during the four years of its work. Few know, however, of theevents occurring since 1920 which led up to, and had an important part in, thecreation subsequently of the Organizing Committee. These events, and the menassociated with them, were in fact the foundation upon which the preparations forthe Games of the Xth Olympiad finally rested. In the year 1919 there was formed in Los Angeles, at the instance of thepublishers of the daily newspapers of the city, the California Fiestas Association,for the purpose of reviving the old Spanish fiestas typical of the history and atmos-phere of our State and City. In preparing for this undertaking, it became obvious almost immediately thatthe contemplated project could not proceed without there first being provided thefacilities of a stadium. Thus it was that the plan was first approached, for whatlater became the Los Angeles Memorial Colosseum, now known to the Olympicworld as the Olympic Stadium. The California Fiestas Association was dissolved in 1920 and its memberssubsequently formed the Community Development Association. This organizationwas incorporated as a non-profit association, with an allowed maximum of twenty-one members and directors. Its personnel consisted of outstanding leaders in thecivic and business life of the community. The Association immediately engaged in ajoint plan with the governments of the city and county of Los Angeles under whichit financed and erected the Los Angeles Memorial Colosseum in Exposition Park, 33
  31. 31. ABANDONED HORSERACING COURSE IN EXPOSITION PART (OLYMPIC PARK) PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF THE LOS ANGELES MEMORIAL COLOSSEUM (OLYMPIC STADIUM) AND OTHER FACILITIES
  32. 32. O r g a n i z a t i o n o f t h e G a m e s PERISTYLE AND EXCAVATION FOR STADIUM BOWL, 1922and agreed to administer the structure for a period of years, at the end of which timethe structure would pass to the city and county of Los Angeles, jointly, together withall revenues derived from its usage, in excess of the cost of maintenance and im-provements, and the carrying on of the stated purposes of the Association. For several years there had been a growing consciousness in local sports cir-cles of the possibility of holding the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. At a meetingof the California Fiestas Association held November 26, 1919, Maximilian F.Ihmsen, one of the directors, presented the suggestion that later resulted in thefirst formal application by the City of Los Angeles to the International OlympicCommittee for the award of the Games. The then President of the Association, William May Garland, had planned to MAYNARD MCFIE A. M. CHAFFEY EDWARD D. LYMAN Chairman COLOSSEUM BUILDING AND ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEE 35
  33. 33. X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2 THE STADIUM TAKES FORMsojourn with his family in Europe in the summer of 1920. He agreed to visit theGames at Antwerp and present to the proper Olympic body such official invitationsas might be prepared. When Mr. Garland left for Europe he carried with him theofficial invitation of the City of Los Angeles, of the County of Los Angeles, of theState of California, and of the Community Development Association, with expres-sions from leading civic organizations . He also took with him plans for the pro-jected stadium and data concerning the natural attractiveness of Los Angeles as acity in which to hold the Games. Upon his arrival in Antwerp, Mr. Garland was introduced to the InternationalOlympic Committee, then in session, and presented his documents and orally urgedan award to Los Angeles. He was very courteously received by the Committee and COMPLETED IN 1923 WITH 75,000 SEATS36
  34. 34. Organization of the Gameswas informed that although the Games of the VIIIth Olympiad (Paris, 1924) hadbeen definitely awarded and a tentative commitment made for the IXth Olympiad(Amsterdam, 1928)) the invitation of Los Angeles would be given every considera-tion in respect to future awards. It should be stated that Baron Pierre de Coubertin, founder, and now LifeHonorary President of the Olympic Games, who was in these earlier years Presidentof the International Olympic Committee, evidenced a strong personal support ofthe invitation of Los Angeles. Baron de Coubertin some years previously hadvisited California and the State had won for itself a warm place in his heart andhis esteem. Thus it may fairly be said that Baron de Coubertin was the first manto begin moulding what has since become a world-wide Olympic friendship forLos Angeles and California, for which this commonwealth will ever be mostgrateful. Following the meeting at Antwerp, Mr. Garland was honored by being electedto membership by the International Olympic Committee as one of the three rep-resentatives for the United States of America. This post Mr. Garland has sinceheld, and throughout the years he has attended virtually all meetings of the Com-mittee and is at this time the senior member for the United States. At the meeting of the International Olympic Committee in Rome in 1923,Mr. Garland formally suggested consideration of the award of the Games of theXth Olympiad to the United States for the year 1932. His colleagues unanimously ENLARGED TO 105,000 SEATS: OLYMPIC STADIUM, 1932 37
  35. 35. X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2and enthusiastically gave a rising vote of endorsement to the suggestion. Thereimmediately followed a similar action designating the city of Los Angeles spe-cifically for the honor of the Xth Olympiad. The award proved to be inspirational to Los Angeles. The Memorial Colos-seum had just been finished by the Community Development Association, and im-mediately other civic and private organizations, and the populace itself, becameOlympically minded with a splendid realization of the responsibility that lay aheadthrough the award of the Games to the city. An early result of this spirit was the construction of the Olympic Auditoriumas a private enterprise, to be operated in behalf of suitable sports in the interveningyears, but with the definite objective of the structure becoming a useful facility inthe Games. It will now be recalled that all of the weightlifting, boxing, and wrest-ling competitions were held in this Auditorium. Privately owned country clubs were inspired to expand their plans for polo andother equestrian sports, and as a consequence of this movement the Riviera CountryClub later provided a magnificent site for the equestrian sports of the Games. Several athletic clubs with complete facilities were developed subsequent tothe award of the Games and the City government expanded its playground andrecreational facilities and equipment. All of these developments laid the founda-tion upon which the Organizing Committee later assumed its great task. The Community Development Association, through its stadium project andits efforts in securing the Games, became logically the organization to contemplatemost seriously the responsibilities that are those of an Organizing Committee. Butthe Association realized that little could or should be done until after the Games ofthe IXth Olympiad in Amsterdam (1928)) and during the four years that followedthe award of the Games in 1923 it therefore devoted itself to numerous other civicprojects of major importance to the community. In 1927 the Community Development Association took the first step in prep-aration for the Games by presenting to the Legislature of the State of California thenecessity of financial aid from the State. This resulted in the passage of a measuregenerally known as the California Olympiad Bond Act of 1927. The principalprovisions of this Act were (1) for the issuance and sale of State bonds in the sumof one million dollars, to yield a fund to be administered specifically in behalf ofthe expenses of preparing for and the holding of the Games of the Xth Olympiad;and (2) the creation of the California Olympiad Commission of five members toadminister the fund to the “Olympiad Corporation” mentioned in the Act, whichcorporation, under the words of the Act, was contemplated and designed tobecome what is known under the Olympic Protocol as the Organizing Committee.38
  36. 36. X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2 The California Olympiad Bond Act of 1927 involved an amendment to theconstitution of the State of California. It was necessary, therefore, that the samebe approved by the voters of the State at the ensuing general election, to be heldNovember 6, 1928. The Community Development Association realized that the work of present-ing this question to the voters would constitute the first major Olympic activity. Ittherefore decided to incorporate under the laws of California a non-profit associa-tion which would meet the requirements of the Olympic Protocol for an OrganizingCommittee as well as to become the “Olympiad Corporation” contemplated in thewording of the Act. On February 10, 1928, such a corporation was formed and became the Or-ganizing Committee, legally known as the Xth Olympiade Committee of the Gamesof Los Angeles U. S. A. 1932 Ltd., a title evolved through correspondence withCount de Baillet-Latour, President of the International Olympic Committee. Themembership of the Organizing Committee was as follows: Russell H. Ballard Harry Chandler Dr. Robert A. Millikan Dr. Frank F. Barham Louis M. Cole Henry S. MacKay, Jr. Harry J. Bauer Edward A. Dickson Maynard McFie Frank J. Belcher, Jr. Zack J. Farmer Henry S. McKee Arthur S. Bent Herbert Fleishhacker Henry M. Robinson E. Manchester Boddy William May Garland LeRoy Sanders William A. Bowen R. B. Hale Paul Shoup F. W. Braun D. A. Hamburger C. C. Teague H. B. R. Briggs William F. Humphrey Walter K. Tuller A. M. Chaffey Fred W. Kiesel G. G. Young Early in 1928 the Organizing Committee decided that its major activities inthat year would be to secure a favorable vote by the people of the State on thefinancing plan previously referred to, and to make a study of the Olympic organismas it might be disclosed at the Games of the IXth Olympiad at Amsterdam. It is proper at this point to set forth the basic policies established by theOrganizing Committee for the carrying out of its task. It was necessary, first, for the Committee to decide upon the type of organ-ization that would be built and enlarged upon from time to time, to assume themanifold departmental activities incident, first, to complete preparations for theGames, and second, for their actual management and administration. It was recog-nized immediately that responsibility automatically rested with the Committee andwould rest there in the last analysis. The great number and complexity of major40
  37. 37. Organization of the Gamesrequirements in respect to active preparations, and the innumerable important de-tails, constituted a formidable picture of effort and responsibility. Reduced to its simplest terms, the task was of such dimensions as to dictatethe necessity for a carefully selected, closely-knitted, and highly efficient executivestaff, upon whom would be placed the entire responsibility of the work, guided bythe fundamental policies of the Committee and under constant liaison between theCommittee and such staff. The Committee realized that a simple but strong formula of procedure, whichshould at once provide protection to the Committee in its responsibility to thecommunity and the world-wide Olympic family and at the same time not constitutean interference in the effectiveness of the work of the staff, was advisable. TheCommittee chose from among its own membership one of its Directors, Zack J.Farmer, and appointed him General Manager, and to him also was affixed theestablished Olympic title of General Secretary.AMSTERDAM, 1928 — LOS ANGELES, 1932. THE TWO GENERAL SECRETARIES, MAJOR G. VAN ROSSEM AND ZACK J. FARMER, CONFERRING IN LOS ANGELES, 1930 41
  38. 38. X t h O l y m p i a d o f A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2 In the spring of 1928 the General Secretary instituted a campaign to effecta favorable vote by the people of the State of California on the million dollar bondissue. Later in that year the Committee sent the General Secretary to Amsterdam,where he made a careful study of the organization of the Games and made theinitial contacts with the various Olympic groups which were to become so import-ant later in carrying on his work so far from the seats of the various governingOlympic bodies. Several weeks were spent in Amsterdam, where the fullest co-operation was extended by the Dutch Committee, its President, Baron Schimmel-penninck van der Oye, and the General Secretary, Major G. van Rossem. Mr. Garland attended the Games at Amsterdam in his capacity as Presidentof the Organizing Committee and as senior member of the International OlympicCommittee for the United States. In Amsterdam the Olympic officials were intensely busy preparing for theGames, and this precluded as intensive a survey of organization as had been hopedfor, although the surface examination and general observations made proved laterto be invaluable. The Games of the IXth Olympiad were an outstanding success. During theyears of their organization the Dutch Committee brought into tangible form whathad become almost a lost record of procedure in the organization of previousGames. As a consequence of the great fidelity of the Dutch Commitee to Olympicprinciples and an appreciation of the seriousness of its task, an organization recordwas established that could well be taken as a basis upon which to build forthe Games of the Xth Olympiad. In this connection, it is a fact that eachOlympiad, through the spirit of co-operation of all branches of the Olympic family,has profited from the experiences of preceding Games and has contributed to thework of succeeding Games. While in Amsterdam the General Secretary recognized in Major G. vanRossem, General Secretary of the Dutch Committee and a veteran of many previousOlympiads, one of the best informed of students of Olympic law, and practice.Therefore, in his first work of getting the full dimensions of the task ahead, theGeneral Secretary arranged to have Major van Rossem visit Los Angeles for a periodof several months in 1929 and 1930. This visit proved to be of great fundamental value, effecting a definite con-necting link between the Games of Amsterdam and those to be held in Los Angeles,just as it is hoped that the Games of Los Angeles will form a contributorylink with the coming Games of Berlin, and so on, through the years, evolvinginto a tangible, progressive movement for the organization of the Games inthe Olympiads to come.42
  39. 39. FACSIMILE OF OFFICIAL INVITATION SENT TO ALL NATIONS
  40. 40. X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2 In the election of November 6, 1928, the people of the State of Califor- nia overwhelmingly voted their approval of the Olympiad Bond Act, thus definite- ly recording the Olympic spirit of the State and the intention to meet all the ob- ligations imposed in the award of the Games, and giving assurance of complete physical preparation and hospitality. It is interesting here to note that while it was thought at the time that considerably more financing would be required, the Committee ultimately managed to carry through the entire project of the Games without any form of financial contribu- tion or subsidy other than the money yielded by the bond issue.WILLIAM MAY GARLAND SIGNING During 1928 the General Secre- THE INVITATIONS tary set the nucleus of the executive or-ganization that was to follow. With two secretarial assistants, he carried on thework of the Committee until December, 1929, when the first steps of staff expan-sion were taken, following which the organization grew steadily as the respectivedepartmental activities were established in the chronological order that had pre-viously been arranged. The Games were to be held on the shores of the Pacific Ocean for the firsttime in the history of the ancient or modern Olympic eras. This fact precipi-tated the first major problem, involving the ability of participating nations tomeet a greater cost than they had been accustomed to, as well as the extendedlength of time participating athletes would have to be away from home. Here-tofore the majority of nations had been able to participate with comparativeease and with a minimum of expense, through the holding of the Games inEurope. At this time the world generally was in a comparatively prosperous condition,but the new problem was still a formidable one. The first effort, therefore, was tocapture the confidence of Olympic nations in behalf of Los Angeles by a con-vincing demonstration of the determination that every possible aid would begiven participating nations, and that the preparations would be of such magni-tude as to warrant every effort toward participation.44
  41. 41. Organization of the Games 1932 It was necessary that the Olympic Committees in all countries should bebrought as close as possible to the pulsations of the Olympic city during the yearsof advance preparations. To accomplish this it was decided that the first organizeddepartment should be the Press Department, to serve as a bureau of informationto Olympic groups as well as a news disseminating agency for the World Press. The Press Department was organized in December, 1929, and immediatelyinstituted what probably was the first systematic world news service during thepreparatory period of an Olympiad. The Department extended its news service toreach all Olympic groups regularly, and this method of constantly spreading thenews of the preparations going forward in Los Angeles accomplished the purposeof bringing the nations closer to the Olympic city in respect to their interest in theforthcoming Games, and of increasing that interest, and thus assisted the NationalOlympic Committee in each country in its ultimate arrangements for the participa-tion of its athletes. The Press Department later directed the constructive publicitythat preceded and accompanied the sale of tickets of admission to the public; andits final activity was, logically, that of rendering co-operative service to the greatnumber of correspondents who came to Los Angeles to report the Games throughthe World Press. On the first of February, 1930, invitations were sent by the Organizing Com-mittee to all countries in general, inviting their participation in the Games of theXth Olympiad. In countries where there was a National Olympic Committeethe document was transmitted to that Committee through the senior member ofthe InternationalOlympic Committeefor that country, ordirect to the Com-mittee in the absenceof an InternationalOlympic Committeemember, and in thecase of countrieshaving no officialOlympic connectionthe document wastransmitted throughthat country’s repre-sentative at Wash-ington. In addition INTERNAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE IN SESSION, OLYMPIC CONGRESS, BERLIN, 1930 45
  42. 42. X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2 to this procedure, the State Department at Washington transmitted an official com- munication to the United States Ambassador or similar representative in each country, requesting him to call to the attention of the government to which he was accredited the fact that invitations had been issued by the Organizing Committee of the Games of the Xth Olympiad inviting that country’s participation in the event. Immediately following the dispatch of the invitations, the attention of the Committee turned to the forthcoming Olympic Congress, to be held in Ber- lin, in May, 1930. This Congress, which is held in a designated city approximately two years before the Games of each Olympiad, con- sists, first, of a series of executive sessions of the International Olympic Committee and the various International Sports Federations, for the consideration of matters coming within their particular authority, after which these groups consolidate, with the delegates sent from the National Committee in each coun- try, into the general Olympic Congress, where decisions are made on all matters per- taining to the forthcoming Games that have arisen subsequent to the last preceding cele- bration. One of the principal purposes of the Con- gress is to hear and consider the report on prep- arations by the Organizing Committee for theHON. C. C. YOUNG, FORMER GOVERNOR OF forthcoming Games. This is wisely provided CALIFORNIA, WHO AIDED OLYMPIC LEGISLATION for in order that the Olympic organizations may, at a sufficiently early date, learn definitely that the Olympic city has properly and fully undertaken its task, giving warrant of success, or subject itself to decision of the Congress in the failure of such war- ranty. The Organizing Committee of the Xth Olympiad, therefore, crystallized all of its plans for adequate preparations in as definite a manner as possible so far in advance of the Games. A complete report was prepared and submitted to the Con- gress, through the International Olympic Committee, and this report was aug- mented by an exhibit of photographs, architects’ designs, motion picture records of stadiums and other facilities in Los Angeles, and a budget of costs for traveling expenses of the participating groups, with plans for the housing, feeding, local transportation, entertainment, and so forth, of the athletes and officials while in 46
  43. 43. O r g a n i z a t i o n o f t h e G a m e sLos Angeles, together with the tentative programme and arrangement of events asprovided for under the Protocol. The Committee realized, from the beginning of its task, that the properhousing, cuisine, and general accommodations for the athletes while in Los Angeleswere matters of paramount importance. It was felt that the particular needs ofthe athletes under training called for a special housing arrangement, departingfrom hotels or similar types of existing facilities characteristic of all urban cen-ters. In its research of this subject the Committee decided upon the OlympicVillage plan, which later was to become an outstanding feature of the Games.Exceeding the requirements under the Olympic Protocol, the Committee, in afurther effort to reduce the costs for participants, decided to offer all of thefacilities and advantages of the Olympic Village to the participants on a basis ofcharges considerably less than actual cost. A rate of two dollars per day wasfixed for each Village occupant toward the cost of his housing, dining service, localtransportation, entertainment and general care. This charge, together with the reduced transportation rate, made it possiblefor the Committee to submit in its report to the Congress a suggested budget of fivehundred dollars or less for each participant from European shores, covering hisjourney to Los Angeles, his stay in the city for thirty days, and his return home,as against preliminary estimates by various countries averaging as high as fifteenhundred dollars. The Congress immediately observed, through the report of the OrganizingCommittee, that Los Angeles already had taken such steps as would solve the big-gest problems facing the participating countries. The report was enthusiasticallyreceived and had the effect of inspiring complete confidence in the preparations ofthe Olympic city and stimulated the determination of the delegates to return to theirrespective countries and win national support for liberal participation. The suggested man-unit budget of costs for each country, and the OlympicVillage plan, as disclosed in the report, created great interest in the Congress. Itwas difficult for the members to believe that the Organizing Committee was preparedto build an entirely new, specially designed, and completely equipped international“city” for the sole use of athletes and officials participating in the Games. The costwas obviously so great as to exceed very materially the total income to be derivedfrom the nominal charge proposed for each resident. The problems of meeting the special requirements of various nationalities,and of insuring the exclusive and disciplinary type of accommodation found in thepast to be necessary in the training period for the teams, were so well known asto be considered insurmountable. It was recognized that the plan involved actual 47
  44. 44. X t h O l y m p i a d L o s A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2fulfillment of one of the most fundamental ideas or ideals incorporated in thefounding of the modern Games, but there had been no previous demonstrationin history of the feasibility of “bringing the nations together to share a commonlife under a single roof.” The delicacy as well as the magnitude of the plan suggested by the OrganizingCommittee made a deep impression upon the Congress. It is amazing that theCongress, composed of men of practical experience in matters affected by the plan,so promptly and unanimously adopted the Village plan. That action of the Con-gress appears to the now more experienced Organizing Committee of Los Angelesas having been a naive expression of confidence by men who had reasons to bedoubtful of something that they hoped could be achieved but which possessed allthe elements of failure. Perhaps, too, the Organizing Committee had a child-likefaith that the Olympic doctrine would surmount the obstacle of international doubtnaturally to be expected upon the launching of such a plan. It may truly be said,therefore, that the members of the Olympic Congress in Berlin joined with theOrganizing Committee of Los Angeles, through adoption of the Olympic Villageplan, in a test of the strength of the Olympic doctrine and in a determination toshow the world that Olympism as an instrument for physical and cultural advance-ment is impregnable to the prosaic prejudices of race or creed, The Congress officially designated the period for the Games of the Xth Olym-piad to be July 30 to August 14, inclusive, 1932. Before departing for the Berlin Congress, the General Secretary prepared ananticipatory budget of all operations which, together with the proposed report tothe Congress, was approved by the Organizing Committee. This action of the Com-mittee was the “casting of the die” in its assumption of responsibility for the com-munity which had been awarded the Games, and laid the foundation for the Execu-tive Staff to carry out the entire programme of preparations in continuous motion,following the Congress. Governor C. C. Young, of the State of California, previous to the Congress,had appointed the California Olympiad Commission provided for under the Cali-fornia Olympiad Bond Act, for the purpose of administering the State fund to theOrganizing Committee and of co-operating with the Committee in carrying out thepurposes for which the fund had been provided. This Commission held itsfirst meeting October 12, 1929. The members of the California OlympiadCommission were the following : William May Garland Louis B. Mayer John C. Porter William F. Humphrey Malcolm McNaghten Warren B. Bovard Thus, in the summer of 1930, upon his return from the Congress, the GeneralSecretary immediately proceeded with the appointment of an Executive Organiza-48
  45. 45. O r g a n i z a t i o n o f t h e G a m e s tion, filling one position after another as the months elapsed and the burden of the work required it. The Executive Council of five was formed of heads of several departments. Its members were: Zack J. Farmer Gwynn Wilson H. O. Davis William M. Henry J. F. Mackenzie There has been liberal comment regarding the character and efficiency of the organization of the Games. The principle of the Executive Council, together with the type of men comprising it, probably was most responsible for this. The Executive Council laid the foundation for all departments before they were organized, later selecting their personnel and furnishing the working form- ulae. All plans and policies emanated from this Council, and as the many depart- ments came into existence their work was guided by the Council up to, and includ- ing, the period of the Games, the Council consummating the post Games work and concluding their activities with the preparation of this Report. The manager of the Press Department, W. M. Creakbaum, closely associated himself with all activities in order that informative reports might go forward regularly to the Olympic world during the period of preparations. Following the formation of the Executive Council the Organizing Committee appointed a Control Committee composed of three of its members, as follows: Harry J. Bauer Frederick W. Braun Maynard McFie Subsequently, another member, LeRoy Sanders, was added. The Control Committee assumed the very important responsibility of acting as liaison between the Executive Organization, which had been given full authority to proceed, and the Organizing Committee, which was responsible for the acts of the Executive Organization.HARRY J. BAUER FREDERICK W. BRAUN MAYNARD McFIE LEROY SANDERS Chairman CONTROL COMMITTEE 49
  46. 46. X th Olym pi ad L os A n g e l e s 1 9 3 2 The Control Committee met regularly, throughout the period of intensive preparations, in the office of the General Secretary, and thus kept itself constantly informed through the Executive Council of the work of the Executive Organization, and of the status of the budget, which the General Secretary had undertaken from the beginning and which, because of the many flexible items thereon, required con- stant and careful balancing as the preparations matured or assumed definite pro- portions. The Control Committee also acted as a clearing house for suggestions emanating from the Executive Organization and the Organizing Committee and constituted at all times a well informed and sound court of final decision on any debatable questions. This plan made it possible for the Organizing Committee to confine itself to fundamentals and at the same time enabled the Executive Organization to proceed without delays, providing for all concerned a feeling of security as to the correctness of the course being followed in all matters. From the beginning of its work the Executive Organization functioned also under another important principle of operation. An internationally known firm of Certified Public Accountants was appointed to keep the books and all other financial records. Mr. William A. Bowen, a member of the Organizing Committee, acted as Legal Counsel. The work of the Executive Organization, insofar as it involved commitments in any form, received, on the one hand, preliminary examination, advice and deci- sion by Legal Counsel and, on the other hand, independent recording and account- ing in respect to all receipts and expenditures of money. Comprehensive systems and strict rules were established by the Executive Council to effect constant control by the accountants and legal counsel in respect to all matters properly coming under their purview. Early in the work careful study was given to the complexities of the problem of adequate insurance. Many different types of property and forms of activity required the protection of insurance in the interests of the participants as well as of the Organizing Committee and of other corporate and governmental entities involved, includ- ing the interests of spectators at the Games. As a conse- quence, a most thorough and complete line of insurance was effected which adequately protected the interests of all con- cerned in the Games. In order to facilitate arrangements between the Organiz- ing Committee and the representatives of each nation the Organizing Committee, acting under the Protocol, arranged with the National Olympic Committee in each country for theWILLIAM A. BOWEN LEGAL COUNSEL 50
  47. 47. Organization of the Games appointment of an Attaché, native to that country but resident in Los Angeles, and acquainted with the language and customs of that country. In some instances the resident consul was selected. The Attachés served an important purpose following the arrival of the delegations, by acting as liaisons between the managements of the teams and the various departments of the Games organization. They also arranged many entertainments for athletes and officials through the various foreign societies in Los Angeles. Up to this point in this chronicle, it has been the intent to present a simple outline picture of the fundamental elements underlying the organization of the Games. In succeeding pages, the chronicle will become departmentalized under various subject heads and in greater detail. As a matter of policy minutiae have been purposely omitted wherever possible in order to prevent the text from becoming confusing. Considerable detail, of course, will be found in some subjects where it is felt a purpose is served. In some instances, where the average reader might expect to find intensive detail but where it is absent, such detail has been omitted, for the reason that it is felt that while it might be interesting it would be misleading in respect to future Olympiads because of the difference of conditions that will obtain. HUGO BALLIN WESLEY M. BARR W. M. BOWEN L. E. DIXONGEORGE E. FARRAND EDWARD D. LYMAN DONALD B. PARKINSON JOHN PARKINSON ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON PREPARATIONS ORGANIZATION — ARCHITECTURE — ENGINEERING — DECORATIONS 51
  48. 48. Management of the Games THE ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Control Committee Harry J. Bauer, Chairman Maynard McFie, F. W. Braun Leroy Sanders William A. Bowen, Legal Counsel Zack J. Farmer, General Secretary EXECUTIVE COUNCIL Zack J. Farmer Gwynn Wilson H.O. Davis Willliam M. Henry J. F. Mackenzie I GENERAL SECRETARY- SPORTS TECHNICAL OLYMPIC VILLAGE MANAGER DEPARTMENT H. O. Davis Zack J. Farmer William M. Henry Managing Director Julia C. Mayer, Assistant Director Grace Dominick, Secretary Hortensia Elizondo, Secretary R. M. Donaldson ASSOCIATE MANAGER Operating Manager Gwynn Wilson ASSOCIATES Frank Miller F ELICIA S PILLARD , Secretary Al Parmenter Assistant Communications and Programme Harry C. SchmidtOPERATING DEPARTMENT E. M. Beers Steward Gwynn Wilson Statistics and Records H. H. Barter Manager Col. John A. Barry Director of Works Lieut. Charles J. Barrett, Jr. ASSOCIATES Equestrian and Modern Pentathlon PRESS DEPARTMENT Willis O. Hunter Hal Barron W. M. Creakbaum Traffic and Olympic Park Olympic Village Manager Arnold Eddy JO H N G. Fox FRANCES M. GILLAND , Secretary Olympic Stadium Training Facilities ASSOCIATES William W. Monahan Sid Foster Joel Y. Rickman Rowing Stadium Olympic Stadium Events Jack Stratton Stephen W. Cunningham Frank Holborow Equestrian Stadium C. P. L. Nichols ENTERTAINMENT Silas Masters Swimming DEPARTMENT Olympic Auditorium Charles W. Keppen Jean Galloway, Secretary H. Z. Musselman Olympic Auditorium Events SPECIAL ASSIGNMENTS Cycling Stadium Don S. Doig Norman Manning Leo Adams Kenneth Keefe Manager Swimming Stadium Stuart Williams Ed Zuchelli Oliver Chatburn Nye Williams Fencing Stadium Cross Country Events ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT J. Phil Ellsworth Douglas Radford Rumley DeWitt Football Demonstration Yachting Earl F. Campbell H. G. Feraud ARCHITECTURAL Fencing DEPARTMENT OLYMPIC STADIUM Charles H. Hunt Stanley R. Gould Rowing Wilbur F. Bettis R. O. Chick Superintendent Earl Ricker GENERAL OFFICE Eber Jaques Cycling H. W. Odell Assistant Superintendent Sergeant John March Manager J. A. Felton Shooting H. J. Wood Grounds Manager Associate Manager MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS Frank M. Banks WOMEN’S HOUSING Harold Wm. Roberts Assistant Director Grace D. Walker J. Arthur Lewis SECRETARIES TICKET DEPARTMENT Director of Chorus Loro M. Martin John T. BouDreau Edward Goedeck J.F.Mackenzie Director of Bands Thérèse Pierre Manager Agnes James, Secretary OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC OFFICIAL REPORT Raymond P. Roberts DEPARTMENT By the Executive Council Manager, Ticket Office Eyre Powell Gwynn Wilson, Supervisor Ethel I. Mayer, Secretary Supervisor F. G. Browne, Editor

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