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Poems Through The
Seasons
By Lori Caminiti
INTRODUCTION
Ah poetry. It is a mystery to some, a wonder
to others, and a little bit of both to most of
us all. Poetry ca...
Introducing the poem
Start by reading the poem line by line, showing the students only one line at a time. Student
engagem...
Vocabulary
Five vocabulary words were chosen to go along
with each poem. A PDF document is included for
easy access to and...
Fall
Contents:
	 	 School	by	Winifred	C.	Marshall		
In	Autumn	by	Winifred	C.	Marshall	
Who	Has	Seen	the	Wind	by	Christina	...
School
School bells are ringing, loud and clear;
Vacation’s over, school is here.
We hunt our pencils and our books,
And s...
In Autumn
They’re coming down in showers,
The leaves all gold and red;
They’re covering the little flowers,
And tucking th...
Who Has Seen the Wind?
Who has seen the wind?
Neither I nor you:
But when the leaves hang trembling,
The wind is passing t...
The Morns are Meeker Than They Were
The morns are meeker than they were -
The nuts are getting brown -
The berry’s cheek i...
Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving comes but once a year,
But when it comes it brings good cheer.
For in my storehouse on this day
...
Winter
	
	
Contents:
	
The	Star	by	Jane	Taylor	
Stopping	By	the	Woods	on	a	Snowy	Evening	by	Robert	Frost	
Two	Little	Kitte...
The Star
Twinkle, twinkle, little star,
How I wonder what you are!
Up above the world so high,
Like a diamond in the sky.
...
Stopping By the Woods on a Snowy Evening
Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will...
Two Little Kittens
Two little kittens, one stormy night,
Began to quarrel, and then to fight;
One had a mouse, the other h...
January
The days are short,
The sun a spark,
Hung thin between
The dark and dark.
Fat snowy footsteps
Track the floor.
Mil...
My Shadow
I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me,
And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.
He i...
Spring
	
Contents:
Daffodils	by	William	Wordsworth		
The	Lamb	by	Sara	Hale		
A	Fuzzy	Fellow	Without	Feet	by	Emily	Dickinso...
Daffodils 	
I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host,...
The Lamb
Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow,
And everywhere that Mary went The lamb was sure to go;
He f...
A Fuzzy Fellow Without Feet
A fuzzy fellow, without feet,
Yet doth exceeding run!
Of velvet, is his Countenance,
And his C...
Caterpillar
Brown and furry
Caterpillar in a hurry,
Take your walk
To the shady leaf, or stalk,
Or what not,
Which may be ...
The Violet
Down in a green and shady bed,
A modest violet grew,
Its stalk was bent, it hung its head,
As if to hide from v...
Summer
Contents:
Bed	in	Summer	by	Robert	Louis	Stevenson			
Clouds	by	Christina	Georgina	Rossetti	
Tumbling	(Anonymous)	
A...
Bed in Summer 	
In Winter I get up at night
And dress by yellow candle light.
In Summer, quite the other way,
I have to go...
Clouds
White sheep, white sheep,
On a blue hill,
When the wind stops,
You all stand still.
When the wind blows,
You walk a...
Tumbling
In jumping and tumbling We spend the whole day,
Till night by arriving Has finished our play.
What then?
One and ...
Afternoon On a Hill
I will be the gladdest thing
Under the sun!
I will touch a hundred flowers
And not pick one.
I will lo...
The Cow
The friendly cow all red and white,
I love with all my heart:
She gives me cream with all her might,
To eat with a...
Biographies
Winifred C. Marshall
v There are no photos of Winifred. She
lived in a time when the camera,
while invented, was difficult...
Christina Georgina
Rossetti
v While her poetry may seem simple,
it is complex in terms of
rhythm, rhyme, and meter.
v She ...
Anonymous
Anonymous? Who is that you might ask? Often times, poems are
found and published
without a name.
Sometimes the p...
Robert Frost
v Robert Frost won four Pulitzer Prizes.
The Pulitzer Prize is an award given
out yearly for good literature....
Emily Dickinson
v Emily had a friend who
introduced her to the
poetry of William
Wordsworth (Daffodils).
After reading his...
Thornton Burgess
v Burgess wrote over 10o books and
many more short stories.
v He had a newspaper series called
Bedtime St...
William Wordsworth
v Wordsworth began writing poetry in
grammar school.
v He was very good friends with the
poet Samuel Ta...
Edna St. Vincent Millay
v Edna St. Vincent Millay could
speak six languages.
v She married at the age of 31, and
her husba...
Jane Taylor
	
	
v Taylor’s poem, The Star was set to a
French tune and became the song
Twinkle Twinkle Little Star that we...
Robert Louis
Stevenson
v Stevenson studied
law at the University of
Edinburg but never
practiced it.
v Many of his books a...
Sarah Josepha Hale
v Hale is known as the “mother of
Thanksgiving” for her push to make
the celebration a national holiday...
John Updike
v John Updike won the Pulitzer Prize for
literature two times.
v He wrote for New Yorker magazine for
several ...
Poems Through the Seasons
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Poems Through the Seasons

  1. 1. Poems Through The Seasons By Lori Caminiti
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION Ah poetry. It is a mystery to some, a wonder to others, and a little bit of both to most of us all. Poetry can be an excellent tool in the classroom in the aid of reading. Studies show that any good literature program contains phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and text comprehension. Most teachers do a good job of developing these skills with their students in their classroom; however, it can be difficult and time consuming to come up with lessons in all of these instructional components. Using a poem is a quick, engaging way that can easily address these five areas. This book is designed to aid the teacher in using poetry in the classroom to enhance literacy. The poems in this book were carefully chosen to be age-appropriate and relevant to the student. These poems can be used with students within the 7-12 age range. The Basics When using poetry in the classroom, it is helpful to have some background knowledge about poetry in general. Below are some key words and definitions. • Poetry: a type of literature that uses artistic writing in an attempt to stir a reader's imagination or emotions. The poet does this by carefully choosing and arranging language for its meaning, sound, and rhythm. • Rhythm: Rhythm is the beat in a poem. It can also be called meter. Each syllable in the words of the poem contributes to the rhythm. When lines of poems have the same of similar number of syllables, it helps to create a smooth rhythm and beat to the poem. It is very important for the flow of words. • Rhyme: A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds (or the same sound) in two or more words, most often in the final syllables of lines in poems and songs.
  3. 3. Introducing the poem Start by reading the poem line by line, showing the students only one line at a time. Student engagement is increased when the poem is introduced this way. Student love the inquisitive nature of this, and are excited to get to the end of the poem to put together the lines to figure out the meaning. To introduce a poem line by line, a copy can be placed under a document camera and the lines not being read can be covered with a sheet of paper. An alternative method would be to write the poem on sentence strips and introduce the lines that way. Comprehension As each line is introduced, stop and ask the students what they think it means. Stop and talk about the vocabulary words they may be unfamiliar with. Talk about decoding strategies when encountering difficult words. Talk about the meaning of the word in context. Finally, at the end of the poem put it all together and ask the question: What do you think the poet wants us to know after reading this poem? Phonics and Phonemic Awareness When all the lines have been introduced: ask the children to find the rhyming words. Circle them if using a document camera or write them on the board. Increase phonemic awareness by leaving off the beginning sound of the rhyme and having the students repeat it. A favorite activity is to have the students clap out and count the syllables in each line of the poem. Next to the line write down how many syllables that line contains. Students are always amazed and get really excited to “discover” that the poem used exactly the same number of syllables in each line, or that a pattern was used. When discussing syllables, it is a great time to talk about the rhythm of poetry.
  4. 4. Vocabulary Five vocabulary words were chosen to go along with each poem. A PDF document is included for easy access to and printing of the cards. Once printed, the vocabulary cards can be displayed in the room. The students can work on learning the meanings, using them in sentences and drawing pictures of the words. Since the vocabulary words are by nature a bit more complex, the words can be used for reading instruction as well in decoding. Biographies The biographies included in this book were written so the students would be able to read about the poet and connect to them with a picture. The biographies can be printed out for each individual student to read, discuss and understand. They can also be added to the book at the end of the year. An alternative would be to read the biography to the students and discuss key points. Student work After the poem has been thoroughly discussed, it can then be given to students to illustrate. Before letting them illustrate, brainstorm about the types of things (related to the poem) that they may draw. It is always amazing to hear what the kids come up with. The poems they illustrate can be kept in a student folder throughout the year. At the end of the year the teacher or a parent volunteer can organize the poems in the way they were introduced and bind them with inexpensive binding combs and construction paper covers. Biographies can be included if desired. The student will then have a keepsake to take home with them at the end of the year. Students can also practice the poem several times and recite the poem to the class. This will help to build speaking and fluency skills.
  5. 5. Fall Contents: School by Winifred C. Marshall In Autumn by Winifred C. Marshall Who Has Seen the Wind by Christina Rossetti The Morns are Meeker Than They Were by Emily Dickinson Thanksgiving by Thornton Burgess
  6. 6. School School bells are ringing, loud and clear; Vacation’s over, school is here. We hunt our pencils and our books, And say goodbye to fields and brooks, To carefree days of sunny hours, To birds and butterflies and flowers. But we are glad school has begun, For work is always mixed with fun. When autumn comes and the weather is cool, Nothing can take the place of school. By Winifred C. Marshall
  7. 7. In Autumn They’re coming down in showers, The leaves all gold and red; They’re covering the little flowers, And tucking them in bed They’ve spread a fairy carpet All up and down the street; And when we skip along to school, they rustle ‘neath our feet! By Winifred C. Marshall
  8. 8. Who Has Seen the Wind? Who has seen the wind? Neither I nor you: But when the leaves hang trembling, The wind is passing through. Who has seen the wind? Neither you nor I: But when the trees bow down their heads, The wind is passing by. By Christina Rossetti 1872
  9. 9. The Morns are Meeker Than They Were The morns are meeker than they were - The nuts are getting brown - The berry’s cheek is plumper - The rose is out of town. The maple wears a gayer scarf - The field a scarlet gown - Lest I sh'd be old-fashioned I’ll put a trinket on. Emily Dickinson
  10. 10. Thanksgiving Thanksgiving comes but once a year, But when it comes it brings good cheer. For in my storehouse on this day Are piles of good things hid away. Each day I’ve worked from early morn To gather acorns, nuts and corn, Till now I’ve plenty and to spare Without a worry or a care. So light of heart the whole day long, I’ll sing a glad Thanksgiving song.” By Thornton Burgess
  11. 11. Winter Contents: The Star by Jane Taylor Stopping By the Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost Two Little Kittens (Anonymous) January by John Updike My Shadow by Robert Louis Stevenson
  12. 12. The Star Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are! Up above the world so high, Like a diamond in the sky. When the blazing sun is gone, When he nothing shines upon, Then you show your little light, Twinkle, twinkle, all the night. Then the traveller in the dark Thanks you for your tiny sparks; He could not see which way to go, If you did not twinkle so. In the dark blue sky you keep, And often through my curtains peep, For you never shut your eye 'Till the sun is in the sky. As your bright and tiny spark Lights the traveller in the dark, Though I know not what you are, Twinkle, twinkle, little star. By Jane Taylor
  13. 13. Stopping By the Woods on a Snowy Evening Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sound’s the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. By Robert Frost
  14. 14. Two Little Kittens Two little kittens, one stormy night, Began to quarrel, and then to fight; One had a mouse, the other had none, And that's the way the quarrel begun. "I'll have that mouse," said the biggest cat; "You'll have that mouse? We'll see about that!" "I will have that mouse," said the eldest son; "You shan't have the mouse," said the little one. I told you before 'twas a stormy night When these two little kittens began to fight; The old woman seized her sweeping broom, And swept the two kittens right out of the room. The ground was covered with frost and snow, And the two little kittens had nowhere to go; So they laid them down on the mat at the door, While the old woman finished sweeping the floor. Then they crept in, as quiet as mice, All wet with the snow, and cold as ice, For they found it was better, that stormy night, To lie down and sleep than to quarrel and fight. Anonymous Circa 1880
  15. 15. January The days are short, The sun a spark, Hung thin between The dark and dark. Fat snowy footsteps Track the floor. Milk bottles burst Outside the door. The river is A frozen place Held still beneath The trees of lace. The sky is low. The wind is gray. The radiator Purrs all day. By John Updike
  16. 16. My Shadow I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me, And what can be the use of him is more than I can see. He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head; And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed. The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow— Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow; For he sometimes shoots up taller like an india-rubber ball, And he sometimes gets so little that there's none of him at all. He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play, And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way. He stays so close beside me, he's a coward you can see; I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me! One morning, very early, before the sun was up, I rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup; But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head, Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed. By Robert Louis Stevenson
  17. 17. Spring Contents: Daffodils by William Wordsworth The Lamb by Sara Hale A Fuzzy Fellow Without Feet by Emily Dickinson Caterpillar by Christina Georgina Rossetti Violet by Jane Taylor
  18. 18. Daffodils I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. William Wordsworth
  19. 19. The Lamb Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow, And everywhere that Mary went The lamb was sure to go; He followed her to school one day- That was against the rule, It made the children laugh and play To see a lamb at school. And so the teacher turned him out, But still he lingered near, And waited patiently about, Till Mary did appear. And then he ran to her and laid His head upon her arm, As if he said, "I'm not afraid- You'll shield me from all harm." "What makes the lamb love Mary so?" The little children cry; "Oh, Mary loves the lamb, you know," The teacher did reply, "And, you, each gentle animal In confidence may bind, And make it follow at your call, If you are always kind." Sara Hale
  20. 20. A Fuzzy Fellow Without Feet A fuzzy fellow, without feet, Yet doth exceeding run! Of velvet, is his Countenance, And his Complexion, dun! Sometime, he dwelleth in the grass! Sometime, upon a bough, From which he doth descend in plush Upon the Passer-by! Emily Dickinson
  21. 21. Caterpillar Brown and furry Caterpillar in a hurry, Take your walk To the shady leaf, or stalk, Or what not, Which may be the chosen spot. No toad spy you, Hovering bird of prey pass by you; Spin and die, To live again a butterfly. Christina Georgina Rossetti
  22. 22. The Violet Down in a green and shady bed, A modest violet grew, Its stalk was bent, it hung its head, As if to hide from view. And yet it was a lovely flower, Its colours bright and fair; It might have graced a rosy bower, Instead of hiding there, Yet there it was content to bloom, In modest tints arrayed; And there diffused its sweet perfume, Within the silent shade. Then let me to the valley go, This pretty flower to see; That I may also learn to grow In sweet humility. By Jane Taylor
  23. 23. Summer Contents: Bed in Summer by Robert Louis Stevenson Clouds by Christina Georgina Rossetti Tumbling (Anonymous) Afternoon On a Hill by Edna St. Vincent Milay The Cow by Robert Louis Stevenson
  24. 24. Bed in Summer In Winter I get up at night And dress by yellow candle light. In Summer, quite the other way, I have to go to bed by day. I have to go to bed and see The birds still hopping on the tree, Or hear the grown-up people's feet Still going past me in the street. And does it not seem hard to you, When all the sky is clear and blue, And I should like so much to play, To have to go to bed by day? By Robert Louis Stevenson
  25. 25. Clouds White sheep, white sheep, On a blue hill, When the wind stops, You all stand still. When the wind blows, You walk away slow. White sheep, white sheep, Where do you go? By Christina Georgina Rossetti
  26. 26. Tumbling In jumping and tumbling We spend the whole day, Till night by arriving Has finished our play. What then? One and all, There's no more to be said, As we tumbled all day, So we tumble to bed. Anonymous circa 1745
  27. 27. Afternoon On a Hill I will be the gladdest thing Under the sun! I will touch a hundred flowers And not pick one. I will look at cliffs and clouds With quiet eyes, Watch the wind bow down the grass, And the grass rise. And when lights begin to show Up from the town, I will mark which must be mine, And then start down!
  28. 28. The Cow The friendly cow all red and white, I love with all my heart: She gives me cream with all her might, To eat with apple-tart. She wanders lowing here and there, And yet she cannot stray, All in the pleasant open air, The pleasant light of day; And blown by all the winds that pass And wet with all the showers, She walks among the meadow grass And eats the meadow flowers. By Robert Louis Stevenson
  29. 29. Biographies
  30. 30. Winifred C. Marshall v There are no photos of Winifred. She lived in a time when the camera, while invented, was difficult to use. Instead, artists drew pictures to represent the person. v Winifred C. Marshall was the first person in the state of North Carolina to publish a novel. It is called “Family Anecdotes.” v She is buried at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, DC. ncpedia.org Winifred C. Marshall was born in Newark, England in 1761. She was a talented writer, and published her first book at the age of 17. When she was 23, she married Joseph Gales. Together, they ran a publishing business and bookshop in Sheffield, England. They wrote and published a newspaper that spoke out against the government of England, calling for change. Winifred and her husband had five children. They decided to move to America when they could no longer stay in England. They first moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Later, they moved to Raleigh, North Carolina and then onto Washington, DC. In each of these cities, they wrote and published newspapers. Winifred was known to have a lively, welcoming house, full of good conversations about politics, life and art. Winifred wrote sixteen poems, stories and essays throughout her life. She wrote pieces speaking out against slavery, and she wrote children’s books about religion, and of course, she wrote poetry. She died at the age of 78, after having lived a full life. Source: http://ncpedia.org/biography/gales-winifred-marshall
  31. 31. Christina Georgina Rossetti v While her poetry may seem simple, it is complex in terms of rhythm, rhyme, and meter. v She enjoyed the creative companionship of her older, artistic brothers while growing up. v Her inspiration for her poems came from walking around outside her grandfather’s cottage, near London. www.historyswomen.com Christina Georgina Rossetti was one of four children. She came from a very creative Italian family. Her father was a poet, and her brother was the famous Dante Gabriel Rossetti, a painter and a poet. Dante even helped her with the artwork on the covers of her poetry books. She was a governess and she took care of children. She became sick, however, and could not do this job for very long. She was confined to her house a lot, where she wrote poetry. She liked to write poems for children, and she liked to write poems about religion. She was a very pure, humble girl. Her sense of humor and critical eye can be seen through her poetry. She died in 1894 at the age of 64. Source: http://www.britannica.com/biography/Christina-Rossetti
  32. 32. Anonymous Anonymous? Who is that you might ask? Often times, poems are found and published without a name. Sometimes the poet wants to remain anonymous because they are feeling nervous about how their poem will be received. If their name is not attached, they are free to write what they are feeling. Sometimes, the poem is written by someone famous, and the poet wants to see how well he or she will be received based on writing alone. Novel writers do this all the time. They write under a pseudonym, or an assumed name. Anonymous authors wrote both the popular rhymes Hush-a-Bye-Baby and Itsy Bitsy Spider. Sometimes, the poet is not known because the poem came from the oral tradition, and started out as a folksong, a song that sung and passed down from generation to generation. Whatever the case, there are many great poems whose authors are unknown. Image: www.vectorstock.com
  33. 33. Robert Frost v Robert Frost won four Pulitzer Prizes. The Pulitzer Prize is an award given out yearly for good literature. v He read his poem, The Gift Outright during President John F. Kennedy’s inauguration ceremony in 1961. He had to recite it from memory, because blowing snow and light print made reading it nearly impossible. v He taught throughout his life, and even went back to his alma mater, Harvard to teach classes. www.americaslibrary.gov Robert Frost was born in 1874 in San Francisco, CA. During high school, he found his love for reading and writing. He attended Dartmouth and Harvard colleges. He worked as a teacher, a cobbler, an editor and a farmer. He married Elinor White in 1895. She was the inspiration for many of his poems. They moved to England, where they met other more successful poets who helped him get his work known and published. One of these poets was a very successful poet named Ezra Pound. Frost came back to the United States after having written two books of poetry in England. By this time, he was an established poet. By 1920, he was the most celebrated poet in America. He lived the rest of his life teaching and writing more books of poetry. He died in Boston in 1963 at the age of 89. Source: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/robert-frost
  34. 34. Emily Dickinson v Emily had a friend who introduced her to the poetry of William Wordsworth (Daffodils). After reading his poems, she became inspired to write her own. v She communicated with most of her friends through letters. v She loved to write poetry using dashes--. Some think it was her way of expressing her freedom, or connecting her thoughts. www.poets.org Emily Dickinson was born in Amherst Massachusetts in 1830. She lived a quiet life, and over time she ended writing 1800 poems. She was an excellent student, even though she missed a lot of school due to illness. She had one brother and one sister. She never got married, and lived her life on the family farm and rarely left home. She wrote notebooks of poetry for years, without anyone in her family realizing what she was doing. In her spare time, she studied botany or plant life. She made an enormous herbarium, where she collected, identified and stored dried plants. She died in 1886 at the age of 56. After she died, her sister discovered all of her poems that she had been writing in her notebook. The first volumes of these poems were published four years after her death, and her poetry kept on getting published, all the way through 1955. Source: http://www.biography.com/people/emily-dickinson-9274190#writing-and-influences
  35. 35. Thornton Burgess v Burgess wrote over 10o books and many more short stories. v He had a newspaper series called Bedtime Stories. Parents would read the stories to their children before they went to bed. v Many of the scenes in his stories were inspired from the area near his home on Cape Cod. artsfoundation.org Thornton Burgess was born in 1874 in Sandwich, Massachusetts. He loved nature, and spent many hours exploring outside near his home on Cape Cod. He married and had one son. His wife died when his son was a baby, and relatives stepped in to help. This meant that sometimes his son would be gone for long periods of time while Thornton worked. It was during one of these separation periods that he got the idea to write Bedtime Stories. He wrote down stories that he would have told his son had he been able to be near him. Friends and relatives wanted to hear his stories, and soon, so did publishers. He remarried years later, to a woman who had two children. He continued writing story after story. In all of his stories, he tried to teach children lessons in life and the world around them. He died in 1965 at the age of 91. Source: http://www.online-literature.com/thornton-burgess
  36. 36. William Wordsworth v Wordsworth began writing poetry in grammar school. v He was very good friends with the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. v He worked on one poem, The Prelude, throughout his entire life. Shenandoahliterary.org William Wordsworth was born in England in 1770. Both of his parents died very young, and he became an orphan. He went to college at the University of Cambridge. Just before he graduated, he decided to take a walking tour of Europe. He came across the French Revolutionary War, which had a deep impact on him. He gained sympathy for the “life, speech and troubles of the common man.” These cares can be seen in his works of poetry. He married Mary Hutchison in 1802 and together they had five children. He liked to walk around the lakes where he lived. In his poem Daffodils, he really did walk upon a field of Daffodils in the wild, while out on a walk with his sister. This inspired him to write the poem. He died in 1850 at the age of 80. Source: www.poets.org
  37. 37. Edna St. Vincent Millay v Edna St. Vincent Millay could speak six languages. v She married at the age of 31, and her husband quit his job to help manage her very busy career. v The Edna St. Vincent Millay Society was created after her death and is located on the grounds of the home she lived at with her husband. It serves to honor her and bring attention to her writings. blogs.stlawu.edu Edna St. Vincent Millay was born in Rockland, Maine in 1892. Edna had two sisters, and her parents encouraged in all the girls in a love of culture and literature. Edna studied piano and theater. She originally wanted to become a pianist, but decided instead to focus her attention on writing and poetry. She ended up winning a very important prize called the Pulitzer Prize in 1923 for her fourth book of poems called The Ballad of Harp Weaver. It is in this poem that the very popular phrase “My candle burns at both ends” was born. She was a very popular writer for her time, and liked to write about subjects that pertained to women. She died in 1950 at the age of 58. Source: http://www.biography.com/people/edna-st-vincent-millay-9408293
  38. 38. Jane Taylor v Taylor’s poem, The Star was set to a French tune and became the song Twinkle Twinkle Little Star that we know today. v She wrote many essays, stories, poems and letters throughout her life that were never published. v People still visit the house In England where she wrote her famous poem. www.allpoetry.com Jane Taylor was born in London in 1783. She wrote with her sister Ann, and together they wrote The Star. She loved to write for young children, and even wrote for a children’s magazine. Her work was widely seen, and the very famous British poet Robert Browning said her work had an influence on his writing. Another famous person, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, loved her poem so much that he composed a song to go along with the words. Lewis Carroll, who wrote Alice in Wonderland, even used her poem when he had the Mad Hatter say, but changed the lines to, “twinkle, twinkle, little bat how I wonder where you’re at.” She died in 1824 at the age of 40. Source: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/jane-taylo
  39. 39. Robert Louis Stevenson v Stevenson studied law at the University of Edinburg but never practiced it. v Many of his books are based on his world travels. v Treasure Island and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are still widely read more than 100 years later. www.telegraph.co.uk Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Scotland in 1850. He traveled around the world, and became a famous writer at a young age. He wrote both fiction and poetry. He wrote Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The idea for the story Treasure Island came after he was drawing a map for his stepson while playing. When it was published, people were glad because at the time, children’s literature was rather boring. Treasure Island is a story based in adventure and excitement. He married Fanny Osbourne in 1876. He was sick a lot even as a child, and his health problems continued into adulthood. He died in 1894 at the age of 44. Source: www.poetryfoundation.org
  40. 40. Sarah Josepha Hale v Hale is known as the “mother of Thanksgiving” for her push to make the celebration a national holiday after writing a letter to President Abraham Lincoln. v She worked with childhood educators to write the poem Mary’s Lamb. v She worked to preserve George Washington’s Mount Vernon Plantation as a symbol of patriotism. www.thewomenseye.com Sara Josepha Hale was born in New Hampshire in 1788. She was schooled at home, then later by her husband. She began her working career as a schoolteacher. She had five children with her husband, but he died after only nine years of marriage. She turned to writing to support herself and her family. She was the editor of Ladies’ magazine, a journal of writing and poems written by women. Later, the magazine’s name was changed to Godey’s Lady’s Book, and it included works by such notable authors as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Edgar Allen Poe. She worked at this magazine for most of her life, and retired at the age of 89. She believed in the importance of education for women, and was a strong supporter of higher education. She died in 1879 at the age of 91. Source: www.biography.com
  41. 41. John Updike v John Updike won the Pulitzer Prize for literature two times. v He wrote for New Yorker magazine for several years. v Updike is considered one of the greatest American fiction writers of his generation. www.notablebiographies.com John Updike was born in 1932 in Pennsylvania. He was an only child, and lived in a stone farmhouse on an 80-acre farm with his parents and grandparents. He loved to read, and his mother encouraged him to write and draw. He was a very good student, and he received a scholarship to attend Harvard University where he majored in English. He married Mary Pennington, an art student at Radcliff College. Together, they had four children. They moved to New York, then finally to Massachusetts. He was a very disciplined writer, and set a schedule for himself so he could get work done. He wrote novels, short stories, works of criticism, and children’s books. He died in 2009 at the age of 76. Source: www.achievement.org

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