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Incover project overview

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Presentation Barbara Anton
Local Renewables Conference 2018

Published in: Environment
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Incover project overview

  1. 1. 14:30 – 16:00 Breakout Sessions Round 2 B2 The wastewater utility of the future. A key player of the circular city? #LocalRenewables @LR_Series
  2. 2. Welcome and overview
  3. 3. Project overview 4 Juan A. Álvarez Rodríguez jaalvarez@aimen.es INCOVER Coordinator
  4. 4. Transform wastewater from a waste stream into a source of new added-value products The challenges:  Main pressures on water resources: climate change, pollution, urbanisation, water scarcity…  Expensive cost of operation and maintenance of wastewater treatment DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT
  5. 5. INCOVER Objectives 6 Main objectives: to reduce at least 50% overall operation and maintenance (O&M) costs of conventionnal WW treatment and alleviate water scarcity  Validate innovative technologies at demonstration scale to obtain bio-products  Develop innovative monitoring techniques (optical sensing and soft sensors)  Assess their cost-effectiveness and sustainability  Develop a tailored Decision Support System for selecting the most technical, social and cost efficient treatment solution  Develop strategies to facilitate a rapid market access
  6. 6. 3-year project : June 2016 – May 2019 Funding by EU H2020 (Topic: Water1b-2015); GA: 689242; 7.2 millions EU contribution (Total budget: 8.4 millions) Project coordinator 18 partners 7 INCOVER project details
  7. 7. INCOVER consortium
  8. 8. At Chiclana and Almeria AQUALIA facilities (Spain) At Helmholtz – Centre for environmental research (Germany) At Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain) Municipal Agricultural wastewater Municipal wastewater Industrial wastewater  Innovative monitoring techniques via optical sensing monitoring  Tailored Decision Support System for selecting the most technical, social and cost effective solutions INCOVER Case studies
  9. 9. Municipal and agricultural wastewater (Barcelona – Spain) Hybrid horizontal tubular photobioreactor Pretreatment unit Digestate tank Biogas cleaning Sludge Treatment Wetland P sorption columns Case study 1
  10. 10. Municipal wastewater (Chiclana/Almería – Spain) Chiclana site Almería site Case study 2
  11. 11. Industrial wastewater (Leipzig – Germany) (Grey wastewater + C-rich wastewater) Non-sterile process to produce citric acid in decentralised treatment Case study 3
  12. 12. 13 INCOVER main technologies  PHA production - PhotoBioReactor system - High Rate Algae Pond  Organic acid production  Physical and thermal pre treatment  Anaerobic codigestion process  Integral biogas upgrading
  13. 13. 14 INCOVER main technologies  Nutrient recovery : - Adsorption columns - Planted filters  Solar-driven disinfection : - Anodic oxidation - Ultrafiltration  Smart irrigation system  Anaerobic digestate valorisation: - Sludge treatment wetlands - Evaporative systems - HTC process  Optical sensing and monitoring
  14. 14. 15 INCOVER by-products Bio-plastics (PHA) Organic acids Bio-fertilisers Biochar Treated water Energy (biomethane)
  15. 15. Visit our website www.incover-project.eu Follow us on Twitter Contact us : incover-project@oieau.fr 16 More information
  16. 16. 17 Thank you ! The project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 689242
  17. 17. Q&A #LocalRenewables @LR_Series
  18. 18. INCOVER Pitches - Carlos Alberto Arias, Senior Researcher, Department of Bioscience – Aquatic biology, Aarhus University - Peder Gregersen, CEO, Centre of Recirkulering - Alexander Wolf, Project Engineer, Water Treatment Systems, SolarSpring - Andreas Aurich, Scientist, UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - Pedro García Encina, Institute of Sustainable Processes, University of Valladolid
  19. 19. Recovery of N & P from Wastewater Carlos Alberto Arias Aarhus University Local Renewables Conference 2018 24-26 October 2018, Freiburg
  20. 20. 21 New developments using coated materials for the recovery of N&P from wastewater • Phosphorus from unsatisfactory wastewater discharge to the environment can have detrimental effect on receiving water bodies. • Phosphorus removal is commonly tackled using chemical precipitation. • Chemical precipitation implies the use of coagulants-flocculants, resulting in large volumes of solids and limiting the recovery of P for other uses. • Engineered materials with P binding capacity can allow the removal as well as direct recovery of P for agriculture and other activities • The selected material and the production processes must have P adsorption capacity while being able to release the bound P. • The capacity can be optimized by coating the material to improve hydraulic and P removal capacity
  21. 21. 22
  22. 22. 23 Nutrient removal tests in the field
  23. 23. N & P recovery in evaporative systems Peder K.S. Gregersen Center for Recirkulering Local Renewables Conference 2018 24-26 October 2018, Freiburg
  24. 24. 25
  25. 25. 26 N&P recovery in an evaporative system in Chiclana, Spain In evaporative systems trees are for used for digestate and the aim is to uptake macro-nutrients N:P:K in the biomass and use it as fertilizer directly in hot climates. The system is in total 250 m2 in two separate parts: - The west part has to its limits for first year received 432.74 kg DM - The east past has received 700.91 kg. Test will be done on nutrients, heavy metals, xenobitic substances and phatogens. No serious amounts will be expected as long as the origin of wastewater is domestic.
  26. 26. 27 N&P recovery in an evaporative system in Chiclana, Spain 1.2 % Drymatter 30 % Drymatter Only energy used is for distribution of digestate
  27. 27. 28 N&P recovery in an evaporative system in Chiclana, Spain Two output Dried sludge with 30 % Dry Matter Wood with expected 50 % Dry Matter
  28. 28. 29 N, P & K recovery in an evaporative willow system, Denmark
  29. 29. 30 N, P & K recovery in an evaporative willow system, Denmark Nutrients uptake in kg /ha First year production on second year root Clone Bjørn Jorr Tora Fraction Stem s Leave s Total Stems Leave s Total Stems Leave s Total Tons DM /ha 9,4 1,4 10,8 10,0 2,1 12,1 10,1 1,5 11,6 Total N 120, 0 50,4 170,4 101,9 68,1 170,0 89,0 48,1 137,1 P 26,0 7,3 33,3 27,0 11,5 38,4 25,9 4,4 30,3 K 85,4 61,7 147,1 121,2 91,8 213,0 123,0 75,3 198,3 Production increase to 16 to 19 tonnes of drymatter in average of 1st to 3th year.
  30. 30. 31 N, P & K recovery in an evaporative willow system, Denmark  Heavy metal uptake in g /ha First year production on second year root Clone Bjørn Jorr Tora Fraction Stems Leaves Total Stems Leaves Total Stems Leaves Total Tonnes DM/ha 9,4 1,4 10,8 10,0 2,1 12,1 10,1 1,5 11,6 Cd 1,645 0,226 1,871 3,604 0,331 3,934 3,414 0,292 3,705 Pb 0,387 0,331 0,718 0,515 0,728 1,242 B. det.l 0,420 - Zn 200,815 24,806 225,620 205,894 49,050 254,944 253,472 31,891 285,363 Cu 14,517 3,007 17,523 23,163 6,062 29,225 15,518 4,441 19,959 Ni 1,935 0,053 1,988 1,647 0,287 1,933 1,242 0,118 1,360 Cr 7,743 0,601 8,344 19,560 1,323 20,883 9,311 0,646 9,957 Hg 0,173 0,132 0,305 0,186 0,194 0,380 0,186 0,142 0,328
  31. 31. Solar-driven Ultrafiltration Alexander Wolf SolarSpring, Freiburg Local Renewables Conference 2018 24-26 October 2018, Freiburg
  32. 32. 33 Solar driven Ultrafiltration - Technology Benefits • Water reuse from pre-treated wastewater for agriculture, irrigation or municipal cleaning purposes • Reliable water quality up to 99,9999% retention of particles, microorganisms, bacteria and 99,99 % of viruses • Low specific water production cost of 0,10€/m³ • Environmentally friendly due to chemical free operation • Completely automatic operation • Low maintenance and operation costs
  33. 33. 34 Solar driven Ultrafiltration- Technology details outer pipe Mulitbore membrane fiber Mulitbore membrane fiber epoxy resin supportive structure membrane layer
  34. 34. 35 Solar driven Ultrafiltration- Capacity overview 5m³/day 25m³day 50m³/day 1000m³/day
  35. 35. Yeast based bioprocesses for organic acids Andreas Aurich, Steffi Hunger, Norbert Kohlheb, Roland A. Müller, Mi-Yong Lee Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig – UFZ Local Renewables Conference 2018 24-26 October 2018, Freiburg
  36. 36. Eco-Technologies in Case-study 3 (Leipzig) for a circular economy 37 Carbon rich Wastes Yeast Bioreactor + Membrane Filtration One Stage AcoD (yeast) HTC System Organic Acids Yeast biomass Bio-Coal Activated Coal Carbon Black Biogas Digestate  Yeast bioprocess for Citric acid Industrial Wastewater Why is citric acid a target for circular economy?  Important biotechnological bulk chemical - 1,600,000 t/a  Various applications as cleaner, decalcifier, acidification, food & beverage additive (E330), blood stabilizer  Centralized world scale production  local consumption  Use of sugars as carbon source  food vs. fuel controversy
  37. 37. Decentralized Citric acid production – Example: Use of commercial kitchen & catering wastes 38 Low equipped 1 m3 IBC reactor Feedstocks Kitchen cleaning WW Waste frying oil (WFO) Products Citric acid Yeast biomass • Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica • Non-sterile process conditions • Aerobic conditions, pH 4-5 • Technical grade CA (solution) for non-food & pharma applications • On-site consumption (e.g. cleaner) Biogas
  38. 38. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Citricacid[g/L] Time [h] WFO + WW - sterile WFO - sterile WFO + WW - non-sterile Results of Citric acid production with Waste frying oil and different types of WW  Non-sterile CA bioprocess comparable with results under sterile conditions (Patent application: Aurich, Hunger, Lee, Kohlheb, Müller (2017) PCT/EP2017/065589)  CA concentrations are exceeding industrial process with A. niger 39 Yarrowia lipolytica Wastewater + WFO Time (h) CA (g/L) Producti- vity (g/L*h) Oil & Fat separator discharge 95-165 128-145 0.8 - 1.2 Kitchen cleaning discharge 190 182 0.95 Urban WW 190 134 0.7 Industrial Aspergillus niger process with sugars, molasses 120-144 100-140 0.8 – 1.0
  39. 39. 40 Advantages and main impacts of yeast based CA production with wastewater and wastes  Bioprocess for high-value products under non-sterile conditions  Low equipped bioreactors reduce costs of invest and energy demand (e.g. sterilization)  Allows valorization of local & regional wastes & WW in a decentralized environment and on-site consumption of bio-products  Strengthening of a circular economy by closing the material circuits (Reuse of waste & WW; residual yeast biomass for biogas)  Substitution of conventional Oil&Fat separators in food industries and kitchen services
  40. 40. Photosynthetic biogas upgrading in WWTPs Pedro García Encina Institute of Sustainable Processes University of Valladolid Local Renewables Conference 2018 24-26 October 2018, Freiburg
  41. 41. Technology: Photosynthetic Biogas upgrading CH4(g) CO2(g) H2S(g) Wastewater Microalgae Biomass H2S (L)CO2 (L) O2-freeCH4(g) SO4 2- (L) O2 (L) Treated Water
  42. 42. Technology: Photosynthetic Biogas upgrading
  43. 43. Technology: Photosynthetic Biogas upgrading Upgrading Capacity: 300 Nm3/h
  44. 44. Technology: Photosynthetic Biogas upgrading
  45. 45. Wastewater plants in the circular city: An ambition to achieve or a dream far away? - Christian Loderer, Project and innovation manager, Kompetenzzentrum Wasser Berlin - Francis Meerburg, Research study responsible in R&D, Aquafin - Gerard Pol-Gili, Project manager, Renewable Energy, Eurometropolis of Strasbourg - Juan A. Álvarez Rodríguez, INCOVER coordinator & research strategy manager on environment, AIMEN

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