Songs of the Day
“Shake Your Thang”
by Salt-N-Pepa
from 1988 album A Salt with a Deadly Pepa
“Take on Me”
by Ah- Ha
from t...
Songs of the Day
“We’re Not Gonna Take It”
by Twisted Sister
from 1984 album Stay Hungry and Still Hungry
“Ask”
by The Smi...
Beginning the writing process /
Introduction and a Thesis Statement.
Group Activity – Pertaining to writing a
strong thesi...
Writing about Art
thesis statement
a short statement, usually one sentence, that summarizes the main
point or claim of an essay, research pa...
Thesis Statement – Place it at the end of your first paragraph
Examples of how you can word your thesis statement:
In this...
I should understand!
WHO – The artist – Mariana Wells
WHAT – The artwork - title
HOW – Analyzing using formal elements, co...
Class Activity
!
Gregory!Crewdson,!un/tled!work!from!the!series!"Beneath!the!
Roses",!2003>2005!!
Analyze!this!image!and!c...
From c. 1450-1870, ideas and techniques developed during the
Renaissance dominated Western art.
Three important ones:
BEAU...
Beauty in proportion
The Golden Mean or The Golden Ratio
Beauty
Beauty in aesthetics
Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy dealing with
the nature of art, beauty, and taste, with the
crea...
Beauty in aesthetics Beauty
Aesthetics change based on time and history
Renaissance aesthetics
Modern aesthetics
Postmoder...
observed Reality as a kind of Truth
This was not always valued in art!
Illusion
observed Reality as a kind of Truth
This was not always valued in art!
Illusion
Atmospheric!Perspec/ve ! !Linear!Perspec/v...
Religious & Secular Themes
Giovanni Bellini
San Zaccaria Altarpiece
1505
John Singer Sargent,
Beatrice Golet,
1890
Modernism
The Modern Era
What major technological/social event in the 19th
century changed the lifestyles of
most of the W...
Modernism
Modern Art / Artists
Reacting to Modern existence = the effects of the
Industrial Revolution
Reacting to Renaiss...
Five recurring themes in modernist art:
1.  Seeing and perspective
2.  Abstraction
3.  Expression
4.  Fantasy
5.  Concept/...
Claude Monet, Gare St-Lazare,,1877;
French, oil on canvas, 32 1/2" x 39 1/9 , Fogg
Museum, Harvard University; Boston, Mas...
Claude Monet, Waterlilies with Clouds, 1903, oil on canvas
Claude Monet, Waterlilies with
Clouds, 1903, oil on canvas
Compared with the Academic painting that
came before, it looked...
Claude Monet,
Grainstacks in the
Sunlight, Morning Effect,
1890, oil on canvas
Haystacks were “neutral receptacles for lig...
Claude Monet, Haystacks
Different times of day result in different lighting and colors
Claude Monet, Haystacks, End of Sum...
Paul Cézanne, Le Cabanon de Jourdan,
1906, oil on canvas, 26” x 32”
Post-Impressionism
Interest in shapes
and angles in
ad...
Cezanne’s concept of “the equivalent”
•  The painting is not a secondary thing – a shadow
or copy of the real thing
•  The...
Paul Cézanne, Mont
Sainte-Victoire, 1895
In contrast to Monet, the titles of Cézanne's landscapes
do not indicate the time...
1. Seeing and Perspective
Impressionism
• Pleasure
• Light
• Color
• Spontaneity
Post-Impressionism
• Color
• Light
• Shap...
Five recurring themes in modernist art:
1.  Seeing and perspective
2.  Abstraction
3.  Expression
4.  Fantasy
5.  Concept/...
2. Abstraction
•  Shapes are abstracted – simplified or reduced to
geometric forms
•  Often nonrepresentational
•  General...
Georges Braque
La Roche-Guyon, 1909
Cubism
The next step beyond
Cezanne…
The Cubists compressed
all possible views of an
o...
Georges Braque, Chateau
at La Roche-Guyon, 1909
Abstracted to be an
arrangement of prisms
& triangles, cascading
down
Base...
Pablo Picasso, Glass of Absinthe, c. 1913
Shapes are broken down into cubes and other
geometric fragments
Pablo Picasso, The Guitar
Player, summer 1910, Oil on
canvas, 100 x 73 cm Musée
National d'Art Moderne, Centre
Georges Pom...
Umberto Boccioni, The City Rises, 1910, oil
on canvas, 79 x 119”, The Museum of
Modern Art, New York
Futurism
Began as a r...
“A roaring
motorcar
which looks
as though
running on
shrapnel, is
more beautiful
than the
Victory of
Samothrace!”
Futurism...
A synthesis of labor, light
and movement
We see: violent action,
speed, and
disintegration of objects
by light
Note too th...
Giacomo Balla, Dynamism of a Dog on a
Leash,I 1912, 35 x 45.5”, Buffalo Fine Arts
Academy, New York
Futurism
Multiplicatio...
2. Abstraction
Cubism
• Shape and angle
• Multiple perspectives
Futurism
• Motion, speed, energy
• Dynamics of modern livi...
Five recurring themes in modernist art:
1.  Seeing and perspective
2.  Abstraction
3.  Expression
4.  Fantasy
5.  Concept/...
3. Expression
The distortion (exaggeration or abstraction) of
reality for an emotional effect.
Form and composition are in...
Expressionism
According to art historians, Expressionism is
the opposite of Impressionism.
"An Expressionist wishes, above...
According to art historians, Expressionism is the opposite of
Impressionism.
"An Expressionist wishes, above all, to expre...
Henri Matisse, Red Studio, 1911, oil on canvas,
71 x 86”, Museum of Modern Art, New York
Expression
Les Fauves
Color as
ex...
Henri Matisse, Open
Window, Collioure, 1905,
oil on canvas, 22 x 18”
Paris & northern
Europe = drab and
gray
Southern Fran...
Henri Matisse, Harmony in red (La chambre rouge: La desserte--
Harmonie rouge), 1908-1909, oil on canvas, 71 x 96”, The
He...
André Derain, Charing Cross Bridge, London, 1906, National
Gallery of Art, Washington
“It was the era of photography. That may have
influenced us and contributed to our reaction against
anything that resemble...
Vincent van Gogh,
15 Sunflowers, 1888,
oil on canvas
Van Gogh was a
contemporary of
Cezanne, and worked
before the Cubists...
“A sun, a light. . . How beautiful yellow is!”
Vincent van Gogh, The Sower, 1888, oil on canvas
Gabrielle Münter, View with Church,
1910-1911, oil on board, 33 x 45 cm
German Expressionism
Color is an
independent
expre...
Edvard Munch, The Scream,
1893, oil on cardboard
The self in internal
conflict
Nature as other
The city is equated
with in...
Käthe Kollwitz, Widows and Orphans, 1919
Social Expression
In Germany after WWI,
there was tremendous
hardship amongst the...
Kathe Kollwitz, The
Widow I, 1922-23,
woodcut on paper,
15x9”, Ulrich
Museum of Art,
Wichita State
University
A frequent t...
Käthe Kollwitz,
Death and the
Mother
Munch grieved
for himself;
Kollwitz grieved
for humanity
Five recurring themes in modernist art:
1.  Seeing and perspective
2.  Abstraction
3.  Expression
4.  Fantasy
5.  Concept/...
4. Fantasy
Interest in the irrational and fantastic
Use of dream-like images
Desire to help people achieve absolute freedo...
Marc Chagall, Birthday, 1915, oil on cardboard,
32 x 39”, Museum of Modern Art, New York
Influenced by:
•  Russian-Jewish
...
Marc Chagall,
Paris Through
the Window,
1913, oil on
canvas, 52 x
55”,
Guggenheim
Museum, New
York
Salvador Dali, The Persistence of
Memory, 1931
Dali’s “paranoiac -
critical’ method: looking
at one thing and seeing
anoth...
Rene Magritte,
The Listening
Room, 1952
George Melly on Magritte: “He is a secret agent; his object is to
bring into disre...
Rene Magritte, Threatening
Weather, 1929, 54 x 73 cm,
National Galleries of Scotland
Characteristics/Themes:
•  Use of fam...
Dorothea Tanning, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, 1946
Five recurring themes in modernist art:
1.  Seeing and perspective
2.  Abstraction
3.  Expression
4.  Fantasy
5.  Concept/...
5. Concept/Idea
•  A work of art resides in the idea of the artist, not
the physical object that emerges from that idea
• ...
Dada
Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917
Dada artists were united
not by a common style,
but by a rejection of
conventions in a...
“I threw the urinal in their
faces and now they admire it
for its beauty . . . [this is a]
critical misunderstanding. The
...
Marcel Duchamp, Bicycle
Wheel, 1913, Paris
,
bicycle fork and wheel
screwed
upside down onto stool
painted white,
no dimen...
Marcel Duchamp, Bottle
Rack
or
Bottle Dryer, 1914,Paris,
galvanized iron bottle rack
inscription,
no dimensions recorded,
...
Marcel Duchamp, In
Advance of a Broken Arm,
Nov. 1915, New York, wood
and galvanized-iron
American snow shovel
(readymade)...
Marcel Duchamp,
L.H.O.O.Q., 1919, 7 3/4”
x 4 1/8”
Rene Magritte, The Treason of Images,
1928-1929, oil on canvas, 24 x 37”, LA County
Museum of Art
Magritte is reminding us...
Joseph Kosuth
One and Three Chairs, 1965
Conceptual Art (1960s)
•  Art resides in idea, not
object
•  An object is only ar...
Five recurring themes in modernist art:
1.  Seeing and perspective
2.  Abstraction
3.  Expression
4.  Fantasy
5.  Concept/...
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09.17 modernism cont'd

  1. 1. Songs of the Day “Shake Your Thang” by Salt-N-Pepa from 1988 album A Salt with a Deadly Pepa “Take on Me” by Ah- Ha from the 1985 album Hunting High and Low
  2. 2. Songs of the Day “We’re Not Gonna Take It” by Twisted Sister from 1984 album Stay Hungry and Still Hungry “Ask” by The Smiths the 1986 single
  3. 3. Beginning the writing process / Introduction and a Thesis Statement. Group Activity – Pertaining to writing a strong thesis statement Review Major Ideas from 09.10 Introduce some concepts of Modern Art Today’s Schedule
  4. 4. Writing about Art
  5. 5. thesis statement a short statement, usually one sentence, that summarizes the main point or claim of an essay, research paper, etc., and is developed, supported, and explained in the text by means of examples and evidence. Writing about Art – Thesis statement
  6. 6. Thesis Statement – Place it at the end of your first paragraph Examples of how you can word your thesis statement: In this paper I will analyze Mariana Wells,’ “The End of Earth” using formal and connotative description in order to explore the ways that the artwork expresses ideas of destruction and decay. Through analyzing Mariana Wells’ “The End of Earth,” this paper will reveal how the formal qualities of this sculpture express ideas related to the destruction and decay of the environment. Through analyzing Mariana Wells’ “End of Earth,” this paper will reveal how the use of color and texture in this sculpture express ideas of environmental decay. Tell me about the artist, the image, and the ideas /feelings being expressed. Writing about Art – Thesis statement
  7. 7. I should understand! WHO – The artist – Mariana Wells WHAT – The artwork - title HOW – Analyzing using formal elements, connotation, etc. WHY – To demonstrate the art work expresses something Writing about Art – Thesis statement
  8. 8. Class Activity ! Gregory!Crewdson,!un/tled!work!from!the!series!"Beneath!the! Roses",!2003>2005!! Analyze!this!image!and!come!up!with!a!working!thesis!statement.!
  9. 9. From c. 1450-1870, ideas and techniques developed during the Renaissance dominated Western art. Three important ones: BEAUTY ILLUSION RELIGIOUS / SECULAR THEMES Review from 09.10
  10. 10. Beauty in proportion The Golden Mean or The Golden Ratio Beauty
  11. 11. Beauty in aesthetics Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of art, beauty, and taste, with the creation and appreciation of beauty. Beauty
  12. 12. Beauty in aesthetics Beauty Aesthetics change based on time and history Renaissance aesthetics Modern aesthetics Postmodern Aesthetics
  13. 13. observed Reality as a kind of Truth This was not always valued in art! Illusion
  14. 14. observed Reality as a kind of Truth This was not always valued in art! Illusion Atmospheric!Perspec/ve ! !Linear!Perspec/ve!
  15. 15. Religious & Secular Themes Giovanni Bellini San Zaccaria Altarpiece 1505 John Singer Sargent, Beatrice Golet, 1890
  16. 16. Modernism The Modern Era What major technological/social event in the 19th century changed the lifestyles of most of the Western world? Industrial Revolution!
  17. 17. Modernism Modern Art / Artists Reacting to Modern existence = the effects of the Industrial Revolution Reacting to Renaissance ideals
  18. 18. Five recurring themes in modernist art: 1.  Seeing and perspective 2.  Abstraction 3.  Expression 4.  Fantasy 5.  Concept/idea MEMORIZE THESE!
  19. 19. Claude Monet, Gare St-Lazare,,1877; French, oil on canvas, 32 1/2" x 39 1/9 , Fogg Museum, Harvard University; Boston, Mass. Captures the experience of modernity, of being in the station: the smoke, the light, the sensations Spontaneous sensations and impressions of modernity Impressionism Accurate depiction of reality – historical record William Frith, Paddington Railway Station, 1882, oil on canvas, 117 x 257 cm, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, Surrey, England
  20. 20. Claude Monet, Waterlilies with Clouds, 1903, oil on canvas
  21. 21. Claude Monet, Waterlilies with Clouds, 1903, oil on canvas Compared with the Academic painting that came before, it looked messy and unfinished. Thomas Cole, Landscape, 1825, oil on canvas
  22. 22. Claude Monet, Grainstacks in the Sunlight, Morning Effect, 1890, oil on canvas Haystacks were “neutral receptacles for light . . . [with] Each haystack . . . meant to be seen as a sample of something both commonplace and endless”
  23. 23. Claude Monet, Haystacks Different times of day result in different lighting and colors Claude Monet, Haystacks, End of Summer Claude Monet, Grainstacks in the Sunlight, Morning Effect, 1890
  24. 24. Paul Cézanne, Le Cabanon de Jourdan, 1906, oil on canvas, 26” x 32” Post-Impressionism Interest in shapes and angles in addition to light and color
  25. 25. Cezanne’s concept of “the equivalent” •  The painting is not a secondary thing – a shadow or copy of the real thing •  The painting is a thing in itself, as real in the experience of the spectator as the scene the painter painted •  The painting should convey to the viewer an experience •  The painting isn’t an illustration but offers an equivalent sensation through its forms and colors
  26. 26. Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1895 In contrast to Monet, the titles of Cézanne's landscapes do not indicate the time of day nor the season. Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte- Victoire, 1904-1906 Notice the breaking down of the picture plane into planes and areas of color Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte- Victoire, 1904-1906 Color is laid down as abstract shapes, defined by the horizontal, vertical, or diagonal directions in which it was laid down – precursor to Cubism
  27. 27. 1. Seeing and Perspective Impressionism • Pleasure • Light • Color • Spontaneity Post-Impressionism • Color • Light • Shape • angles
  28. 28. Five recurring themes in modernist art: 1.  Seeing and perspective 2.  Abstraction 3.  Expression 4.  Fantasy 5.  Concept/idea MEMORIZE THESE!
  29. 29. 2. Abstraction •  Shapes are abstracted – simplified or reduced to geometric forms •  Often nonrepresentational •  General; non-specific •  Not well defined (the opposite of concrete) •  Emphasis on formal qualities and relationships over narrative or specific meaning
  30. 30. Georges Braque La Roche-Guyon, 1909 Cubism The next step beyond Cezanne… The Cubists compressed all possible views of an object - top, sides, back, front – into one moment for a synthesized view. (new kind of seeing and perspective)
  31. 31. Georges Braque, Chateau at La Roche-Guyon, 1909 Abstracted to be an arrangement of prisms & triangles, cascading down Based on a real place Cubism
  32. 32. Pablo Picasso, Glass of Absinthe, c. 1913 Shapes are broken down into cubes and other geometric fragments
  33. 33. Pablo Picasso, The Guitar Player, summer 1910, Oil on canvas, 100 x 73 cm Musée National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris Cubists were resistant to the illusionism developed in the Renaissance (linear perspective, atmospheric perspective) Shows multiple sides/views of an object simultaneously A kinetic view - the eyes are always in motion
  34. 34. Umberto Boccioni, The City Rises, 1910, oil on canvas, 79 x 119”, The Museum of Modern Art, New York Futurism Began as a rebellion of young intellectuals against bourgeois society and the cultural apathy into which Italy had sunk in the 19th century Related to Cubism
  35. 35. “A roaring motorcar which looks as though running on shrapnel, is more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace!” Futurism The Futurist Manifesto was written by poet and propagandist Filippo Tommaso Marinetti and published in the Paris newspaper Le Figaro on February 20, 1909. According to Marinetti, what needed to be destroyed: libraries, museums, academies, cities of the past (seen as mausoleums). He extolled the beauty of revolution, war, speed, and modern technology.
  36. 36. A synthesis of labor, light and movement We see: violent action, speed, and disintegration of objects by light Note too the strong diagonals of the composition that destabilize it and give it a sense of dynamic energy Umberto Boccioni, The City Rises, 1910, oil on canvas, 79 x 119”, The Museum of Modern Art, New York Futurism
  37. 37. Giacomo Balla, Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash,I 1912, 35 x 45.5”, Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, New York Futurism Multiplication of legs shows simultaneity This later became the device for showing movement in comic strips and cartoons
  38. 38. 2. Abstraction Cubism • Shape and angle • Multiple perspectives Futurism • Motion, speed, energy • Dynamics of modern living
  39. 39. Five recurring themes in modernist art: 1.  Seeing and perspective 2.  Abstraction 3.  Expression 4.  Fantasy 5.  Concept/idea MEMORIZE THESE!
  40. 40. 3. Expression The distortion (exaggeration or abstraction) of reality for an emotional effect. Form and composition are intended to express intense emotion. (the content/subject matter of the artwork might also be emotional, but that is unrelated – Expressionism refers to form only, not content)
  41. 41. Expressionism According to art historians, Expressionism is the opposite of Impressionism. "An Expressionist wishes, above all, to express himself....[An Expressionist rejects] immediate perception and builds on more complex psychic structures. Czech art historian Antonín Mat j ek, 1910
  42. 42. According to art historians, Expressionism is the opposite of Impressionism. "An Expressionist wishes, above all, to express himself....[An Expressionist rejects] immediate perception and builds on more complex psychic structures. Czech art historian Antonín Mat j ek, 1910
  43. 43. Henri Matisse, Red Studio, 1911, oil on canvas, 71 x 86”, Museum of Modern Art, New York Expression Les Fauves Color as expression of emotion “fauve” = “wild beast” in French
  44. 44. Henri Matisse, Open Window, Collioure, 1905, oil on canvas, 22 x 18” Paris & northern Europe = drab and gray Southern France = sunny, colorful and delightful
  45. 45. Henri Matisse, Harmony in red (La chambre rouge: La desserte-- Harmonie rouge), 1908-1909, oil on canvas, 71 x 96”, The Hermitage, St. Petersburg, Russia Colors represent the feeling or experience of a thing, not its actual appearance in the real world
  46. 46. André Derain, Charing Cross Bridge, London, 1906, National Gallery of Art, Washington
  47. 47. “It was the era of photography. That may have influenced us and contributed to our reaction against anything that resembled a photographic plate taken from life.” - André Derain
  48. 48. Vincent van Gogh, 15 Sunflowers, 1888, oil on canvas Van Gogh was a contemporary of Cezanne, and worked before the Cubists, Futurists, and Fauves
  49. 49. “A sun, a light. . . How beautiful yellow is!” Vincent van Gogh, The Sower, 1888, oil on canvas
  50. 50. Gabrielle Münter, View with Church, 1910-1911, oil on board, 33 x 45 cm German Expressionism Color is an independent expressive element rather than a representational vehicle
  51. 51. Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1893, oil on cardboard The self in internal conflict Nature as other The city is equated with internal anxiety
  52. 52. Käthe Kollwitz, Widows and Orphans, 1919 Social Expression In Germany after WWI, there was tremendous hardship amongst the working class, and especially women and children. Kollwitz’s subjects are the visible outgrowth of the war and its senseless destruction. !
  53. 53. Kathe Kollwitz, The Widow I, 1922-23, woodcut on paper, 15x9”, Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State University A frequent theme was the impact war had on women and children
  54. 54. Käthe Kollwitz, Death and the Mother Munch grieved for himself; Kollwitz grieved for humanity
  55. 55. Five recurring themes in modernist art: 1.  Seeing and perspective 2.  Abstraction 3.  Expression 4.  Fantasy 5.  Concept/idea MEMORIZE THESE!
  56. 56. 4. Fantasy Interest in the irrational and fantastic Use of dream-like images Desire to help people achieve absolute freedom Belief that art had the power and duty to change life
  57. 57. Marc Chagall, Birthday, 1915, oil on cardboard, 32 x 39”, Museum of Modern Art, New York Influenced by: •  Russian-Jewish folk tales •  Fauves’ use of color •  Cubist use of space
  58. 58. Marc Chagall, Paris Through the Window, 1913, oil on canvas, 52 x 55”, Guggenheim Museum, New York
  59. 59. Salvador Dali, The Persistence of Memory, 1931 Dali’s “paranoiac - critical’ method: looking at one thing and seeing another He defined his paintings as "hand-done color 'photography' of 'concrete irrationality' and the imaginary world in general"
  60. 60. Rene Magritte, The Listening Room, 1952 George Melly on Magritte: “He is a secret agent; his object is to bring into disrepute the whole apparatus of bourgeois reality. Like all saboteurs, he avoids detection by dressing and behaving like everybody else”
  61. 61. Rene Magritte, Threatening Weather, 1929, 54 x 73 cm, National Galleries of Scotland Characteristics/Themes: •  Use of familiar objects in an unexpected manner •  Dream-like •  Unsettling and uncanny •  Erotic •  Interrelatedness of plant, animal, human, and mechanical worlds •  Fear & loss of innocence
  62. 62. Dorothea Tanning, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, 1946
  63. 63. Five recurring themes in modernist art: 1.  Seeing and perspective 2.  Abstraction 3.  Expression 4.  Fantasy 5.  Concept/idea MEMORIZE THESE!
  64. 64. 5. Concept/Idea •  A work of art resides in the idea of the artist, not the physical object that emerges from that idea •  Artist’s skill is irrelevant •  Often uses Readymades and objets trouves/ found objects •  Often incorporates humor and irony
  65. 65. Dada Marcel Duchamp, Fountain, 1917 Dada artists were united not by a common style, but by a rejection of conventions in art and thought, seeking through their unorthodox techniques, performances and provocations to shock society into self- awareness
  66. 66. “I threw the urinal in their faces and now they admire it for its beauty . . . [this is a] critical misunderstanding. The choice of ready-mades was not aesthetic, but one of visual indifference and absence of good taste.” Marcel Duchamp
  67. 67. Marcel Duchamp, Bicycle Wheel, 1913, Paris , bicycle fork and wheel screwed upside down onto stool painted white, no dimensions recorded Readymade
  68. 68. Marcel Duchamp, Bottle Rack or Bottle Dryer, 1914,Paris, galvanized iron bottle rack inscription, no dimensions recorded, original lost "I just bought it at the bazaar of the town hall."
  69. 69. Marcel Duchamp, In Advance of a Broken Arm, Nov. 1915, New York, wood and galvanized-iron American snow shovel (readymade), no dimensions recorded, original lost Readymade
  70. 70. Marcel Duchamp, L.H.O.O.Q., 1919, 7 3/4” x 4 1/8”
  71. 71. Rene Magritte, The Treason of Images, 1928-1929, oil on canvas, 24 x 37”, LA County Museum of Art Magritte is reminding us that a painting is not what is depicted, but paint on a canvas.
  72. 72. Joseph Kosuth One and Three Chairs, 1965 Conceptual Art (1960s) •  Art resides in idea, not object •  An object is only art when placed in the context of art •  Self-referential •  Includes written statements, spoken statements, artist performances, numerical repetitions in addition to more familiar things like images, sculptures, and installations.
  73. 73. Five recurring themes in modernist art: 1.  Seeing and perspective 2.  Abstraction 3.  Expression 4.  Fantasy 5.  Concept/idea MEMORIZE THESE!

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