Post-It Girl

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Pam Allyn, the founding director of LitWorld, a 501c3 non-profit organization devoted to spreading the belief that words can change worlds through teacher training, school development, and the empowerment of children, tells the story of a girl she met while she was working in Liberia last year. Visit http://www.litworld.org for more information.

Published in: Education, Sports
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Post-It Girl

  1. 1. I want to tell you the story of the little girl you see here.
  2. 2. She learned every line of the hokey pokey in two minutes.
  3. 3. Bumping over dirt roads full of rain water, we visited schools
  4. 4. Bumping over dirt roads full of rain water, we visited schools and talked with teachers doing courageous work with their students in circumstances of heartbreaking deprivation.
  5. 5. In the afternoons, the rains came streaming down,
  6. 6. In the afternoons, the rains came streaming down, the backdrop to the incredible stories the teachers shared,
  7. 7. In the afternoons, the rains came streaming down, the backdrop to the incredible stories the teachers shared, stories of war and catastrophe, hope and joy.
  8. 8. My little dear played outside the window and we waved at each other all day long. 
  9. 9. My little dear played outside the window and we waved at each other all day long.  Her smile was warm and delighted.
  10. 10. My little dear played outside the window and we waved at each other all day long.  Her smile was warm and delighted. The specter of a statistic crowded my mind: two-thirds of all girls in Liberia drop out of school by the age of ten.
  11. 11. My little dear played outside the window and we wavedTwo thirds. all day long.  at each other Her smile was warm and delighted. The By age ten. my mind: specter of a statistic crowded Think of it. two-thirds of all girls in Liberia drop out of school by the age of ten.
  12. 12. I wanted to tell you her name.
  13. 13. I wanted to tell you her name. I wanted to tell you this story of my little dear, but here’s the thing:
  14. 14. I wanted to tell you her name. I wanted to tell you this story of my little dear, but here’s the thing: No one can find her.
  15. 15. I wanted to tell you her name. I wanted to tell you this story of my little dear, but here’s the thing: No one can find her. All our friends and colleagues have been looking.
  16. 16. I wanted to tell you her name. I wanted to tell you this story of my little dear, but here’s the thing: No one can find her. All our friends and colleagues have been looking. She is turning ten, the age of that statistic.
  17. 17. Have we lost the opportunity to know her story, her precious, bright-eyed story?
  18. 18. Have we lost the opportunity to know her story, her precious, bright-eyed story? This is a loss for us. And beyond that, it is a loss for her,
  19. 19. Have we lost the opportunity to know her story, her precious, bright-eyed story? This is a loss for us. And beyond that, it is a loss for her, not to get to tell the story she deserves to tell and be part of a story yet to be written.
  20. 20. My little dear. She took the post-it and pen I gave her and she attached them to her dress.  She was saving them, precious to her.
  21. 21. My little dear. She took the post it and pen I gave her and she attached them to her dress.  She was saving them, precious to her. Soon enough, all the other children did the same.
  22. 22. My little dear. She took the post it and pen I gave her and she attached them to her dress.  She was saving them, precious to her. Soon enough, all the other children did the same. A born leader.
  23. 23. My little dear. She took the post it and pen I gave her and she attached them to her dress.  She was saving them, precious to her. Soon enough, all the other children did the same. A born leader. She turned to smile at me one last time before I left. I wish I could tell you more.
  24. 24. Let us treasure all our children’s stories. Words Changing Worlds.

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