Stories: Your Secret 	 eapon	             W   Presented by ListenIn Pictures
You are the hero of your own life story.
The best news is:You already know how to tell stories!
Your Deep Story Knowledge• Groups of 4• Each group gets either 2 or 3 cards.• Choose which person is going to beyour story...
When listening to the stories, keep thesequestions in mind:What do these stories all have in common?What makes a great sto...
Write down:What is a story?A story that someone shared with youthat really impacted you.A story that you’ve been telling y...
“The ability to dream up andspread these solutions lives ordies on the ability to tell greatstories that inspire people to...
“A story tracks what a personwants, what he’ll do to get it,and what costs he’ll have topay along the way.”John Truby
Stories hold our identities together.
Stories influence our conceptionof what is possible in our real lives.
The storyteller does this by placing  characters, real or fictional, onto a stage and showing what happens tothese charact...
Worksheet, Part 1• List 10 experiences in your life thatchanged you.• They can be good memories or hardmemories.• Either w...
Each character pursuessome type of goal inaccordance with his orher values, facing difficultyalong the way and eithersucce...
Stories are designed to persuade anaudience of a storyteller’s worldview.       How do they do this?      Stories express ...
Stories allow us to createorder out of the chaotic.
They do this by editing out irrelevant details
and defining a cause for each effect.
Stories provide meaningin the strings of thingswe have seen, felt oreven just imagined.
20%          get married of girls in   before they turnBangladesh           15.
Sacral Agenesis      It affects 200,000causes deformities       people in theto the spine in the      United States.      ...
Your Epic Narrative               Vision:an invitation for people to join you
“A good story is a fundamentalingredient in allowing humansto create a sense of us.”Jonah Sachs, Story Wars
Great stories contain lessons encouraging  people to pursue their higher values.
By sharing your values, you can offer youraudience encouragement to seek their own           higher-level potential.
Values               Wholeness:The need to feel sufficient as an individual   and connected to others as part of something...
Values                Perfection:The need to seek mastery of skill or vocation,    often through hard work or struggle
Values                 Justice:The need to live by high moral values and to see the world ordered by morality, to         ...
Values             Richness: The need to examine life in all of itscomplexity and diversity, to seek new experience and ov...
Values             Simplicity:The need to understand the underlying          essence of things
Values          Beauty:The need to experience and create aesthetic pleasure
Values                 Truth: The need to experience and expressreality without distortion, to tear down               fal...
Values            Uniqueness:The need to express personal gifts,  creativity and non-conformity
Values           Playfulness:The need for joy and self expression
Worksheet, Part 2• Wholeness• Perfection• Justice• Richness• Simplicity• Beauty• Truth• Uniqueness• Playfulness
What are three core beliefs that are at the    heart of why you do this work?
Your Epic Narrative needs:• Heroes(audience is a key character in your epic)• Villians• Conflict
We are a movement for _____________.
Today, we’re going to identify some core  stories that will fill our story basket.
?We’re going to learn four core stories and           three plot structures.With all these story options...how do you     ...
Start with the end in mind            Audience   Choose the story that will  get them to take that action               Go...
Think about the shift in perspective youwant the audience to have.Do you have a story of when you had thatshift in perspec...
Example: You want them to support yourorganization financially.So perhaps you tell the story of when yourealized that you ...
Questions to ask when choosing a story:Who is my audience?What action do I want them to take?What aha moment can I facilit...
Perhaps they need to realize:• Awareness:	 – The problem exists.	 – Your solution exists.• Attitudes:	 – You are trustwort...
Worksheet, Part 3• Fill out worksheet for your 3 mainaudiences that you want to developstories for.
Three Plots that Inspire           Challenge Plot:Someone faces a challenge (personal or     external) and overcomes it.
Three Plots that Inspire             Connection Plot:Two people come together across a divide and       teach each other s...
Three Plots that Inspire            Creativity Plot:Someone comes up with a new solution     to a long standing problem.
Ultimate goal of a story:Present a change in a character – a journeywhere they learn something about the world.
The Beginning of Your StoryThe hook: set the stage and introduce who,        what, when, and where.
Present Your ProblemSet up what the character wants, so the listener        wonders how they will get it.
A story is a puzzle-theaudience is putting togetherdifferent pieces to figure outwhat’s going to happen.
Include a detail or anecdote abouthow the challenge was experienced.
Journey to ChangeStruggle of the journey makesthe character change.
The Moment of Change  The AHA! moment.
AfterHow is life different because of this realization? Include a detail or anecdote about how the            impact was e...
Call to Action      Relate the story back to your audience.     “I used to think the world was like this (where your  audi...
This story structure applies to all 3 plots.
Structuring great stories is all about choosing     the details to leave in and leave out.
Your Core Stories         The Calling The story of how you came torealize that you have to dedicate      your life to this...
Your Core Stories            The CallingStory power: inspires others to wake  up to their changemaker destiny, just like y...
Your Core Stories       The Origin   The story of howyour venture got started.
Your Core Stories            The LessonWhat lessons have you learned along   this changemaking journey?
Your Core Stories       The ImpactA story of how your work has      affected the world.
You can use the 3 plot structures        for all of these.
The Calling:– Connection: A person you met whomade you realize you had to dedicateyour life to this issue.– Creativity: Ho...
The Origin:– Connection: A relationship that pushedyou towards starting this.– Creativity: How you came to discover anew s...
The Lesson:– Connection: a person you served whoconvinced you that you should changeyour approach.– Creativity: The story ...
The Impact:– Connection: A person who you servewho bonded with someone on yourteam and discovered something newabout thems...
NOTE:• THESE 3 WEEKS WILL (HOPEFULLY)SHIFT YOUR PERSPECTIVE ON A LOT OFTHESE POINTS.• YOUR STORIES & BELIEFS WILL SHIFT.• ...
Refining the Story:• Choose one story to hone in on.Decide what kind of plot it is. Choose theworksheet that applies that ...
Stories: Your Secret Weapon For Building a Movement
Stories: Your Secret Weapon For Building a Movement
Stories: Your Secret Weapon For Building a Movement
Stories: Your Secret Weapon For Building a Movement
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Stories: Your Secret Weapon For Building a Movement

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Now, more than ever before, we have the opportunity to create real, systemic change.

Through online tools and the rise of peer-to-peer sharing, storytelling has been democratized. Corporations have lost their monopoly on storytelling.

We have the opportunity to tell great stories that inspire people to realize their power as changemakers. But we need to seize it.

Too often, organizations feel unequipped to tell great stories and fall back on descriptions of programs and requests for donations.

Audiences feel like they are giving to you instead of feeling like they are a part of you.

Your audience is hungry for meaning, belonging and purpose.

Let us help you craft a story that will invite people to be a part of something that matters.

By the end of this workshop, you’ll know how to share a narrative that will empower your audience to see themselves as an integral part of your story- driving fundraising, advocacy, engagement and ultimately, CHANGE.

Published in: Self Improvement, Spiritual

Stories: Your Secret Weapon For Building a Movement

  1. 1. Stories: Your Secret eapon W Presented by ListenIn Pictures
  2. 2. You are the hero of your own life story.
  3. 3. The best news is:You already know how to tell stories!
  4. 4. Your Deep Story Knowledge• Groups of 4• Each group gets either 2 or 3 cards.• Choose which person is going to beyour storyteller.• Craft a story around the informationgiven by the cards.
  5. 5. When listening to the stories, keep thesequestions in mind:What do these stories all have in common?What makes a great story?
  6. 6. Write down:What is a story?A story that someone shared with youthat really impacted you.A story that you’ve been telling yourselfthat you want to let go, once and for all.Limiting stories.
  7. 7. “The ability to dream up andspread these solutions lives ordies on the ability to tell greatstories that inspire people tothink differently.”Jonah Sachs, Story Wars
  8. 8. “A story tracks what a personwants, what he’ll do to get it,and what costs he’ll have topay along the way.”John Truby
  9. 9. Stories hold our identities together.
  10. 10. Stories influence our conceptionof what is possible in our real lives.
  11. 11. The storyteller does this by placing characters, real or fictional, onto a stage and showing what happens tothese characters over a period of time.
  12. 12. Worksheet, Part 1• List 10 experiences in your life thatchanged you.• They can be good memories or hardmemories.• Either way- they taught yousomething.
  13. 13. Each character pursuessome type of goal inaccordance with his orher values, facing difficultyalong the way and eithersucceeds or fails accordingto the storyteller’s view ofhow the world works.
  14. 14. Stories are designed to persuade anaudience of a storyteller’s worldview. How do they do this? Stories express values.
  15. 15. Stories allow us to createorder out of the chaotic.
  16. 16. They do this by editing out irrelevant details
  17. 17. and defining a cause for each effect.
  18. 18. Stories provide meaningin the strings of thingswe have seen, felt oreven just imagined.
  19. 19. 20% get married of girls in before they turnBangladesh 15.
  20. 20. Sacral Agenesis It affects 200,000causes deformities people in theto the spine in the United States. womb.
  21. 21. Your Epic Narrative Vision:an invitation for people to join you
  22. 22. “A good story is a fundamentalingredient in allowing humansto create a sense of us.”Jonah Sachs, Story Wars
  23. 23. Great stories contain lessons encouraging people to pursue their higher values.
  24. 24. By sharing your values, you can offer youraudience encouragement to seek their own higher-level potential.
  25. 25. Values Wholeness:The need to feel sufficient as an individual and connected to others as part of something larger, to move beyond self- interest
  26. 26. Values Perfection:The need to seek mastery of skill or vocation, often through hard work or struggle
  27. 27. Values Justice:The need to live by high moral values and to see the world ordered by morality, to overthrow tyranny
  28. 28. Values Richness: The need to examine life in all of itscomplexity and diversity, to seek new experience and overcome prejudice
  29. 29. Values Simplicity:The need to understand the underlying essence of things
  30. 30. Values Beauty:The need to experience and create aesthetic pleasure
  31. 31. Values Truth: The need to experience and expressreality without distortion, to tear down falsehood
  32. 32. Values Uniqueness:The need to express personal gifts, creativity and non-conformity
  33. 33. Values Playfulness:The need for joy and self expression
  34. 34. Worksheet, Part 2• Wholeness• Perfection• Justice• Richness• Simplicity• Beauty• Truth• Uniqueness• Playfulness
  35. 35. What are three core beliefs that are at the heart of why you do this work?
  36. 36. Your Epic Narrative needs:• Heroes(audience is a key character in your epic)• Villians• Conflict
  37. 37. We are a movement for _____________.
  38. 38. Today, we’re going to identify some core stories that will fill our story basket.
  39. 39. ?We’re going to learn four core stories and three plot structures.With all these story options...how do you choose which story to tell?
  40. 40. Start with the end in mind Audience Choose the story that will get them to take that action Goal(the action you want them to take)
  41. 41. Think about the shift in perspective youwant the audience to have.Do you have a story of when you had thatshift in perspective yourself?
  42. 42. Example: You want them to support yourorganization financially.So perhaps you tell the story of when yourealized that you could make a difference inthe world.
  43. 43. Questions to ask when choosing a story:Who is my audience?What action do I want them to take?What aha moment can I facilitate to getthem to take that action? What do theyneed to realize in order to take that action?
  44. 44. Perhaps they need to realize:• Awareness: – The problem exists. – Your solution exists.• Attitudes: – You are trustworthy. – There is a new way to tackle this problem. – The proble is different from how they’ve always thought about it.• Behavior: – They are powerful. – Their actions matter. – They can be a part of something important.
  45. 45. Worksheet, Part 3• Fill out worksheet for your 3 mainaudiences that you want to developstories for.
  46. 46. Three Plots that Inspire Challenge Plot:Someone faces a challenge (personal or external) and overcomes it.
  47. 47. Three Plots that Inspire Connection Plot:Two people come together across a divide and teach each other something.
  48. 48. Three Plots that Inspire Creativity Plot:Someone comes up with a new solution to a long standing problem.
  49. 49. Ultimate goal of a story:Present a change in a character – a journeywhere they learn something about the world.
  50. 50. The Beginning of Your StoryThe hook: set the stage and introduce who, what, when, and where.
  51. 51. Present Your ProblemSet up what the character wants, so the listener wonders how they will get it.
  52. 52. A story is a puzzle-theaudience is putting togetherdifferent pieces to figure outwhat’s going to happen.
  53. 53. Include a detail or anecdote abouthow the challenge was experienced.
  54. 54. Journey to ChangeStruggle of the journey makesthe character change.
  55. 55. The Moment of Change The AHA! moment.
  56. 56. AfterHow is life different because of this realization? Include a detail or anecdote about how the impact was experienced.
  57. 57. Call to Action Relate the story back to your audience. “I used to think the world was like this (where your audience is now, where you were at the beginning of thestory), but know I know that this kind of world is possible.” Empower them to apply the moral of your story to their lives.
  58. 58. This story structure applies to all 3 plots.
  59. 59. Structuring great stories is all about choosing the details to leave in and leave out.
  60. 60. Your Core Stories The Calling The story of how you came torealize that you have to dedicate your life to this work.
  61. 61. Your Core Stories The CallingStory power: inspires others to wake up to their changemaker destiny, just like you did. Also known as the Moment of Obligation.
  62. 62. Your Core Stories The Origin The story of howyour venture got started.
  63. 63. Your Core Stories The LessonWhat lessons have you learned along this changemaking journey?
  64. 64. Your Core Stories The ImpactA story of how your work has affected the world.
  65. 65. You can use the 3 plot structures for all of these.
  66. 66. The Calling:– Connection: A person you met whomade you realize you had to dedicateyour life to this issue.– Creativity: How you came tounderstand this problem in the first place.– Challenge: Your personal journey torealizing your power in the world.
  67. 67. The Origin:– Connection: A relationship that pushedyou towards starting this.– Creativity: How you came to discover anew solution to the problem.– Challenge: The risk that you took totackle a big problem. What you had toovercome to take that leap.
  68. 68. The Lesson:– Connection: a person you served whoconvinced you that you should changeyour approach.– Creativity: The story of how one ofyour assumptions at the beginning of theproject was challenged.– Challenge: How you’ve had toovercome the great hurdles that havebeen placed in your way.
  69. 69. The Impact:– Connection: A person who you servewho bonded with someone on yourteam and discovered something newabout themselves.– Creativity: A person who came upwith a unique way to solve their problembecause of your intervention.– Challenge: A person who has facedan incredibly difficult challenge butovercame it through your intervention.
  70. 70. NOTE:• THESE 3 WEEKS WILL (HOPEFULLY)SHIFT YOUR PERSPECTIVE ON A LOT OFTHESE POINTS.• YOUR STORIES & BELIEFS WILL SHIFT.• THIS IS A GOOD THING. BE OPEN TO IT.
  71. 71. Refining the Story:• Choose one story to hone in on.Decide what kind of plot it is. Choose theworksheet that applies that plot structure.

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