Lucid chart
&
Harmony
Generate a (workflow) application from a flowchart
&
Introducing event driven modeling
Disclaimer
• The scope of this presentation is limited to
flowcharts. BPMN was introduced to standardise
process modelling...
About Lucid chart & Harmony
• LucidChart is great for diagramming:
–
–
–
–

But flowcharts can be complicated and confusin...
What is event-driven modeling?
• A technique in which events depend on each other
to the least extent practicable
• the fo...
Why event-driven?
• Event-driven technique leads to “loosely coupled
systems/applications”

• “loosely coupled systems/app...
Demonstration goals
• We model the process in Lucidchart
– Use a standard (pre-defined) sequence
– Showcase an event drive...
Event driven = loosely coupled system
• events depend on each other to the least extent
practicable
• avoid a pre-defined ...
Demonstration goals
• We model the process in LucidChart
– Use a standard (pre-defined) sequence
– Show case an event driv...
What we’ll do
• Model our process using 4 LucidChart pages:
– Process decomposition
• (Not our favourite ; so don’t spend ...
Bridging the GAP between analysis, design & app development

LUCID CHART & HARMONY
(1) Traditional process decomposition
Tourism – book an accommodation
(2) The traditional flowchart
• Extract of the flowchart – the selection/booking process
(3) Event driven process
Customer service domain
• Customer/booker requests extra (non-available) rooms

• The request is ...
(4) event driven analysis

• After generating the application
– We’ll modify the app and add a decision table which
determ...
(4) event driven analysis

• After generating the application
– Add the decision table which determines
which visitors nee...
Generate the App
Run the app
• All [Lucidchart] processes are created in our app.
– Including the sequence
• Pre-defined
• Event driven (de...
Start workflow: step 0
• The flowchart step-0
• is translated into a Harmony app step

• Harmony’s built-in decision
manag...
Enter data: firing events
• We’ve modeled the step as “standalone”
– Not directly linked to other processes
– Instead the ...
Model vs application

• The flowchart is complex to verify
• Application is easy to verify
– Decisions are clear
– Simulat...
Test variances
• We set value to Yes
• New event is fired
Add a decision table
• the generated app contains a file
–

A file is one-dimensional

• we will replace the file by a DT
...
The 2-dimensional decision table

For any found combination (like UK, FR) 4 outcomes are generated:
brand name, website UR...
Sample of an event/sensor driven
The DMN lending application (Decistion Table implementaion)

ZERO CODING
Click here to vi...
Outcomes of 3 decision tables (1/3)
are input for DT # 4

Click on image to view original (LucidChart) diagram online
We create a dialog(2/3)
in order to provide input

• One rule:
– Ensure that dialog items are match the
inputs to the deci...
And this is the [Harmony] result !
(2hours work (tops))

• Access the app
Useful links
• Run the demo
– https://www.liquidsequence.net/demo2/
– Creating a system support the product sales
process
...
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Lucidchart an event driven approach for generating a (workflow) applications

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Lucidchart is great for diagramming, but flowcharts can be complicated (especially when detailing a process). Add to this that flowcharts don't deal well with data and MOST IMPORTANT flowchart can't be turned into apps.
HARMONY let's you import a Lucidchart flowchart and generate the (workflow) app in less than 30 seconds.
Then use your Harmony configuration, neatly stored in a Google DOCS spreadsheet to:
(1) create / import decision tables
(2) create / import your data
(3) define your rules and calculations
etc, etc,
This is about Agile development - create your prototypes - validate with users - and have your business application ready to support thousands of users!
Harmony = Do It Yourself IT

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  • DT sample added (eventdriven) Nanno 17 Jan 2014
  • Nick Broom
  • Lucidchart an event driven approach for generating a (workflow) applications

    1. 1. Lucid chart & Harmony Generate a (workflow) application from a flowchart & Introducing event driven modeling
    2. 2. Disclaimer • The scope of this presentation is limited to flowcharts. BPMN was introduced to standardise process modelling and, whilst it built on 'standard' flowcharting shapes, its palette and semantics go far beyond the range of flowcharting to really describe how proper processes actually work (ref: NickBroom - expert on BPMN)
    3. 3. About Lucid chart & Harmony • LucidChart is great for diagramming: – – – – But flowcharts can be complicated and confusing Flowcharts don’t deal well with data Flowcharts should be avoided for detailed processes Flowcharts can’t be “executed” / tested • The model must be verified manually • Harmony is great for creating, worfkflow, applications: – But creating a large system for a complex process without a graphical model can be cumbersome – Top notch support for decision tables – Joining process + data – Agile / prototyped development generate • Focus on validating the process (Prototype) change check
    4. 4. What is event-driven modeling? • A technique in which events depend on each other to the least extent practicable • the focus must be for each event to produce a clearly defined outcome (result); • Such an outcome can be a pre-condition for an(other) event. • Events are triggered ( “act”) when the condition is met. • Each event represents an autonomous task / work package • thus simplifying modeling … analysts/power users don’t have to worry .. • if I do this - then this must have been done or • if I do this - then I also must do this, and this, and ….
    5. 5. Why event-driven? • Event-driven technique leads to “loosely coupled systems/applications” • “loosely coupled systems/applications” provide enormous flexibility • Samples of event driven processes • Customer has accepted order [terms] [external trigger] • Stock for product A is less than 10 [number threshold] • Cancelation period has passed [time threshold] • Samples of event driven applications • email address exists ? Prompt contact details • Customer age < 16? prompt parent authorization required • Customer has not reacted during cancelation period ? (ship) ordered product
    6. 6. Demonstration goals • We model the process in Lucidchart – Use a standard (pre-defined) sequence – Showcase an event driven “flow”chart • Harmony uses flowchart to generate the system – We use the generated system to verify the modeled process (the sequence, aka workflow ) • We then enrich the application: decision – Replace with a decision table – Add files / data to match “real” world process – Add authorization / access • Verify the system ( (workflow / process) • Validate the system with users generate change check
    7. 7. Event driven = loosely coupled system • events depend on each other to the least extent practicable • avoid a pre-defined sequence: • when step1 is done do step2, • when step2 is done do step3 • event driven processes – define processes using conditions such as • Customer accepts order [=yes] [external trigger] • product stock less than 10 [number threshold] • Cancelation period more than 3 days [time threshold] • event driven applications • email address exists ? Prompt contact details • Customer age < 16? prompt parent authorization required • Customer has not reacted during cancelation period ? (ship) ordered product
    8. 8. Demonstration goals • We model the process in LucidChart – Use a standard (pre-defined) sequence – Show case an event driven “flow”chart • Harmony uses flowchart to generate the system – We use the generated system to verify the modeled process (the sequence, aka workflow ) • We then enrich the application: – Replace decision with a decision table – Add files / data – which trigger the process – Add authorization / access • Verify the system (workflow / process) generate change check
    9. 9. What we’ll do • Model our process using 4 LucidChart pages: – Process decomposition • (Not our favourite ; so don’t spend too much time verifying this ) – “Standard” fLowchart • Process flow + datastores (files) + decisions – “domain” model for customer service processes – Event driven flows (process steps) • Log on to Harmony instance – Import the diagram & generate app (takes 30 -60 seconds) – Verify the process - log on to the Harmony app • Data drives the process – checking decision support outcomes – Change our application - log on to Google DOCS • Insert a Decision Table • Generate the app generate – Verify the process change check
    10. 10. Bridging the GAP between analysis, design & app development LUCID CHART & HARMONY
    11. 11. (1) Traditional process decomposition Tourism – book an accommodation
    12. 12. (2) The traditional flowchart • Extract of the flowchart – the selection/booking process
    13. 13. (3) Event driven process Customer service domain • Customer/booker requests extra (non-available) rooms • The request is processed by the customer service department
    14. 14. (4) event driven analysis • After generating the application – We’ll modify the app and add a decision table which determines which visitors from foreign countries need an ID
    15. 15. (4) event driven analysis • After generating the application – Add the decision table which determines which visitors need an ID
    16. 16. Generate the App
    17. 17. Run the app • All [Lucidchart] processes are created in our app. – Including the sequence • Pre-defined • Event driven (depending on data values) • Run the app: https://www.liquidsequence.net/latest/ • Note on authorization • All events (process steps) are visible when logging on using “Administrator” role
    18. 18. Start workflow: step 0 • The flowchart step-0 • is translated into a Harmony app step • Harmony’s built-in decision management shows next step
    19. 19. Enter data: firing events • We’ve modeled the step as “standalone” – Not directly linked to other processes – Instead the step is conditioned by “data”” • Enter data – Step (event) fired
    20. 20. Model vs application • The flowchart is complex to verify • Application is easy to verify – Decisions are clear – Simulate by entering any data
    21. 21. Test variances • We set value to Yes • New event is fired
    22. 22. Add a decision table • the generated app contains a file – A file is one-dimensional • we will replace the file by a DT – a standard 2-dimensional decision table • What do we need to do? – – – – delete the datasheet (the file) import or create the DT upload the configuration (after 30 secs the new version is ready: run the app)
    23. 23. The 2-dimensional decision table For any found combination (like UK, FR) 4 outcomes are generated: brand name, website URL, id required, price multiplier For samples: http://www.liquidsequence.com/Decision-Table-samples.html
    24. 24. Sample of an event/sensor driven The DMN lending application (Decistion Table implementaion) ZERO CODING Click here to view the case
    25. 25. Outcomes of 3 decision tables (1/3) are input for DT # 4 Click on image to view original (LucidChart) diagram online
    26. 26. We create a dialog(2/3) in order to provide input • One rule: – Ensure that dialog items are match the inputs to the decision tables
    27. 27. And this is the [Harmony] result ! (2hours work (tops)) • Access the app
    28. 28. Useful links • Run the demo – https://www.liquidsequence.net/demo2/ – Creating a system support the product sales process – http://www.slideshare.net/LiquidSequence/online-sales-application-selectproduct-create-quote-accept-and-ship-from-warehouse • Lucidchart – Online diagram (process model) – (same) PDF • Decision tables – samples – TableSpeak – Decision modeling Lending sample

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