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Badges and Microlearning: The Perfect Match

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Find the sweet spot of learner engagement by combining the bite-sized power of microlearning with the motivating effect of digital badges. By chunking your content to create microlearning-style tutorials and using digital badges to reward learners and mark their achievements, you will increase learner persistence and success in your online courses!

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Badges and Microlearning: The Perfect Match

  1. 1. BADGES AND MICROLEARNING THE PERFECT MATCH
  2. 2. CAL STATE FULLERTON FACULTY MASTER OF SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY Lindsay O’Neill jloneill@fullerton.edu • Case Study • Program Design Dr. Cynthia Gautreau cgautreau@fullerton.edu • Badges • Microlearning Dr. Barbara Glaeser bglaeser@fullerton.edu • Learner Persistence
  3. 3. GET READY TO RESPOND We’ll use Kahoot! for a survey and terminology overview.
  4. 4. BADGES
  5. 5. DIGITAL BADGES
  6. 6. DIGITAL BADGE DEFINITION •Digital badges are an indicator of accomplishment. Better than certificates, they have metadata which links back to show what student did to earn it. •Badges are also known as microcredentials!
  7. 7. DIGITAL BADGES AND HIGHER EDUCATION o New to higher education o Stole the idea from Boy Scouts, video games, and others o First appeared in 2011, in a white paper by Mozilla Foundation, Peer 2 Peer University, in collaboration with The MacArthur Foundation.
  8. 8. How do you recognize accomplishments in Pac Man?
  9. 9. Too young to remember Pac Man-- what about The Walking Dead?
  10. 10. CONFERENCE BADGES
  11. 11. DIGITAL BADGES: THREE PARTS Issuer creates and awards the badge Recipient receives the badge from issuer Consumer views the badge on LinkedIn
  12. 12. LINKEDIN DIGITAL BADGES ISSUER
  13. 13. RECIPIENT
  14. 14. CONSUMER
  15. 15. MICROLEARNING OVERVIEW
  16. 16. MICROLEARNING DEFINITION •Definition: few seconds to 15 minutes! Often 4 minutes or less. •Or, as long as it takes to cover a learning objective (or two).
  17. 17. MICROLEARNING DESIGN STRATEGIES •Learning that happens in small bursts –Focus on ONE learning objective. –Typically includes a short high quality video –Often 4 minutes or less of instruction –Ask the learner to demonstrate their knowledge (less focus on answering questions---show what you can do!)
  18. 18. LEARNER PERSISTENCE
  19. 19. LEARNER PERSISTENCE ● This part contains SCIENCE which may cause confusion. ● PERSISTENCE IS RECOMMENDED FOR MAXIMUM UNDERSTANDING Self-Determination Theory: The ability of a learner to self-regulate which involves learning to control behavior in a learning environment.
  20. 20. THE SELF-REGULATED LEARNER Learners who can self- regulate are more effective because they: • Are aware of learning as it happens. • Over time, they learn what behaviors result in maximum learning. • Learn to do apply these behaviors strategically to a variety of learning situations. These behaviors are strongly influenced by motivation. To encourage motivation, we need to “energize” the learner (Deci, Vallerand, Peletier, and Ryan, 1991). Badging does this!
  21. 21. HOW DOES BADGING ENERGIZE THE LEARNER? Need for COMPETENCE Badging tells the learner he or she has met the learning goals, and thus, are competent in that topic/activity/skill Need for RELATEDNESS Badging helps the learner relate to the instructor and peers when they see themselves on the Leader Board Need for AUTONOMY Badging rewards the learner for regulating their learning in ways that resulted in success! ENERGIZATION with badges is based on three goals of behavior:
  22. 22. SO HOW DO WE APPLY THIS KNOWLEDGE? BADGING WILL BE MOST SUCCESSFUL IF: The learner values badges as a reflection their true learning competence. • Give choice to the learner to earn badges or skip them. 1.
  23. 23. SO HOW DO WE APPLY THIS KNOWLEDGE? BADGING WILL BE MOST SUCCESSFUL IF: Badges are not seen as “rewards” that are bestowed capriciously by the instructor, which removes the need for autonomy and control. • Set badging up so that the learner sees it as an activity under their control - again, choice is important. 2.
  24. 24. SO HOW DO WE APPLY THIS KNOWLEDGE? BADGING WILL BE MOST SUCCESSFUL IF: The learner can portray him or herself in the most positive social light, which meets the need for relatedness. • Allow learners to opt out of the leader board 3.
  25. 25. Four Types of Learner: •Aggressive independent (AI)—High in energy with little need for approval, they prefer to work alone and are frequently disorganized and impulsive. Direct with others, they prefer to solve situations in real time, not proactively. •Passive independent (PI) —Low in energy with little need for approval, they prefer not to participate and may act contrarily to their own best interests. Frequently underachieving, they may develop negative feelings toward per-sonal academic ability. •Aggressive dependent (AD)—High in energy with high need for approval, they are motivated to participate and actively seek help outside of class. Though frequently high achievers, peer esteem increases stress instead of satisfaction. •Passive dependent (PD)—Low in energy with high need for approval, they are compliant and nonconfrontational. Gentle and caring, their need for approval causes disagreement and criticism to be interpreted as personal rejection DO LEARNER CHARACTERISTICS MATTER? (Fanferelli & Mcdaniel, 2015)
  26. 26. DO LEARNER CHARACTERISTICS MATTER? (Fanferelli & Mcdaniel, 2015) •44 participants enrolled in either a Badged or Unbadged Web and Graphic Design Courses. •Students could view their own badges but not others. •Results: –Satisfaction with the course was highly related to the number of Badges earned. –Passive Dependent (PD) learners performed significantly worse than Aggressive Dependent (AD) learners in Badged courses than Unbadged courses for engagement and reflective and integrative learning. –Why? • Even though both groups have a high need for approval that Badges provided, it seemed that the higher energy levels from ADs resulted in higher performance beyond the earning of badges. –So what? • Dependent learners will benefit from badging systems that offer badges more frequently, during regular intervals, to provide a more consistent source of potential approval
  27. 27. CASE STUDY Microlearning + Badges
  28. 28. • Regional university • 40,000 students • Pressure to scale up library instruction SETTING
  29. 29. TECHNOLOGY Design & Development • Software: Articulate Storyline 2 • Tutorials packaged as SCORM Implementation • Badges module added onto Moodle • SCORM packages embedded into library course • Badges set up to issue for 100% score on tutorials
  30. 30. TUTORIAL STRUCTURE Services & Collections Services Research services Librarians vs. Circulation vs. Interlibrary Loan Collections Kinds of materials How to locate
  31. 31. SERVICES & COLLECTIONS
  32. 32. PROGRAM SUCCESS Meta-Badge 1,074 badges issued Tutorial Badges 5,744 badges issued (About 1,000 hours of instructional time) In last 13 months:
  33. 33. PROGRAM DESIGN
  34. 34. PROGRAM DESIGN • Start with the big picture • Badge programs should be: –Hierarchical –Organized • Badge art should convey meaning University of Central Florida Spark Tutorials
  35. 35. CHUNK YOUR LEARNING ACTIVITIES • Tutorials of 15 minutes or less to earn low-level badge • Higher-level badges might take more time – but be conscientious of time to completion
  36. 36. AN EFFECTIVE PROGRAM USES THE BACKWARD DESIGN MODEL
  37. 37. Learning outcomes Assessment (simulations, scored quizzes, graded projects) Content (videos, readings) Practice (games, unscored quizzes) BACKWARD DESIGN
  38. 38. Learning outcomes Content (videos, readings) Practice (games, unscored quizzes) Assessment (simulations, scored quizzes, graded projects) ORDER OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES
  39. 39. Student masters learning outcomes BADGE! DESIGN GOAL
  40. 40. BADGE ISSUANCE Minimum threshold met? Assessment Digital badge issued Yes No
  41. 41. TAKE IT HOME
  42. 42. SUMMARY • Badges = microcredentials • Microlearning = 4 to 15 minutes • Digital badges = motivational • Design thoughtfully!
  43. 43. QUESTIONS? Lindsay O’Neill jloneill@fullerton.edu Dr. Cynthia Gautreau cgautreau@fullerton.edu Dr. Barbara Glaeser bglaeser@fullerton.edu Slides: jlindsayoneill.com/perfectmatch CAL STATE FULLERTON FACULTY MASTER OF SCIENCE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY

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