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Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 1
Lindsay Bebout
May 5, 2015
Journalism 312
Heloiza Herscovitz
Modern Day Slavery: It Do...
Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 2
Human trafficking is a serious crime and a deep violation of human rights. Globally, i...
Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 3
viewer's attention to specific parts of a media outlet’s news story, de-emphasize othe...
Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 4
widely.” By comparing human trafficking to “modern-day slavery” The Economist is choos...
Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 5
After analyzing 20 of The Economist’s articles on human trafficking, the conclusion ca...
Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 6
References
1. 11 Facts About Human Trafficking. (n.d.). Retrieved May 1, 2015, from
ht...
Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 7
The Economist Sources
1. Everywhere in (supply) chains
http://www.economist.com/news/i...
Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 8
19. Illegal markets
http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2013/04/daily-chart-1...
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Human Trafficking

  1. 1. Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 1 Lindsay Bebout May 5, 2015 Journalism 312 Heloiza Herscovitz Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist According to article 3 of the “Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons” found on the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime’s (UNODC) website, human trafficking is the act of recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or selling of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation (2015). The global media coverage from The Economist on human trafficking can best be described as negative. Based on a preliminary analysis of 20 stories published by The Economist between the years 2013-2015, it can be concluded that that specific news outlet believes human trafficking is a serious problem that needs to be stopped. Every story published is not just a reported overview of a simple story that happened. Throughout each story, The Economist uses different elements to make their position known and obvious. The Economist makes it clear that human trafficking is a disgusting act happening in the world today and that there needs to be an end to it. Topic Background
  2. 2. Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 2 Human trafficking is a serious crime and a deep violation of human rights. Globally, it is the 3rd ranked crime. Every year, thousands of men, women and children are abducted by traffickers, in their own countries as well as abroad. Every country in the world is affected by trafficking; a country of could be the emergence center, the center of transportation, or a destination for victims. Trafficking victims include child all the way to older adults, both women and men, and both legal and illegal citizens. Traffickers exploit their victims sexually, for labor, or for their organs. According to Do Something’s website, 80% of victims are exploited sexually, 19% for labor. The average pay for these victims is only $90 (2015). The American media outlet CNN has started a campaign to end human trafficking titled “The CNN Freedom Project: Ending Modern Day Slavery”; this can be found on the media’s website on its own page. CNN says their goal is to “amplify the voices of the victims of modern-day slavery, highlight success stories and help unravel the tangle of criminal enterprises trading in human life.” According to the website, the human trafficking industry currently rakes in $150 billion a year and right now there are 36 million people that are being trafficked. These numbers continue to grow yearly; because of this it is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. (2015). Theory and Methodology The media dramatically shapes the way current issues are viewed. According to an article posted by the University of Oregon’s journalism department, the framing theory is the process by which an issue is portrayed in the news media. Media frames provide boundaries around a news story and determine what is. Media outlets rely on media frames to decide what to include in a story and what to leave out. Media frames are used to organize ideas for a media outlet’s news content; it supplies a context and persuades the audience of what the issue is. This is a process that can be conscious, instinctive or culture-bound. A media frame may draw a
  3. 3. Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 3 viewer's attention to specific parts of a media outlet’s news story, de-emphasize other parts, and leave out some aspects completely. How issues are framed impacts how the public will be affected by the news. This is significant because how people think about issues influences policy outcomes (2015). All 20 sources that came from The Economist comes from an American media outlet. Despite the fact that many of the stories are about human trafficking situations happening in other parts of the world, The Economist use many first hand sources to write the articles. These sources include victims of human trafficking, volunteers that have helped the cause, experts, and journalists who have covered the topic in depth. Using these sources brings a different tone and perspective to the articles than would be brought if someone merely reported news from a second hand source. This information can be found in the material that is written and posted by them. Findings Framing Elements Tone Negative Sources American, International, victims, experts, volunteers Imagery/Adjectives The Economist makes their negative opinion known about the human trafficking industry. It refers to human trafficking as “modern day slavery.” When talking about the situation in Thailand, they describe it as “not good.” In another story they call the human trafficking industry a “global enemy.” Overall Perception Human trafficking is a disturbing industry that the government needs to make a push for to end. The tone The Economist’s has embedded in its stories about human trafficking is heavily negative. In the article headlined “Still trapped”, they state, “Modern-day slavery persists
  4. 4. Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 4 widely.” By comparing human trafficking to “modern-day slavery” The Economist is choosing to boldly state its stance. The article continues, “Fortunately there is some evidence that the airing of it [human trafficking] nudges governments to respond to the bad publicity by taking some remedial legislative action.” This statement demonstrates The Economist’s desire for there to be an end to the human trafficking industry. Instead of simply reporting the global stories, it has decided to make its stance on human trafficking known. This is also an illustration of their desire for the world’s governments to step in on and make an impact for the cause. Another inclination of their negative feelings would be the way Thailand was described in the story headlined “Half a peg downward”; “The news for Thailand was not good. It was downgraded to Tier 3, the lowest rank among countries evaluated by the State Department.” The phrase “not good” is a highly biased phrase no matter what it is referring to. By using that phrase, it cannot be argued that The Economist has a negative stance on human trafficking. An Economist article headlined “Here be monsters”, Maung Toe’s slaved past is talked about; it reports that he had been forced aboard a boat by an unfamiliar man at gunpoint and sold by a broker to the captain for $900. The Economist chooses to use personal stories and first hand stories that make the article more emotional. By using heart wrenching the stories, The Economist is hoping that their readers will become advocates for wanting to end human trafficking as well. Even the articles posted by this media that only touch on the subject still refer to human trafficking negatively. In an article headlined “Freedom for the captives”, the human trafficking industry is referred to by it as “a global enemy.” Through a combination of different elements found in its articles, The Economist has made their position on human trafficking very clear. Conclusion
  5. 5. Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 5 After analyzing 20 of The Economist’s articles on human trafficking, the conclusion can be made that The Economist is an advocate against it. The articles stray away from just reporting the news; instead, they consistently frame human trafficking in a negative light and push for the government to put a stop to it. They use a high amount of first hand sources for their stories which makes the articles more emotional for their readers. By manipulating their reader’s emotions, they are attempting to try and persuade them to join in on the advocacy. Human trafficking is a topic that the entire global population should be biased about; because of this, it does not make The Economist any less credible.
  6. 6. Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 6 References 1. 11 Facts About Human Trafficking. (n.d.). Retrieved May 1, 2015, from https://www.dosomething.org/facts/11-facts-about-human-trafficking 2. The Facts. (2015, January 1). Retrieved May 1, 2015, from http://thecnnfreedomproject.blogs.cnn.com/category/the-facts/ 3. Frame. (n.d.). Retrieved May 1, 2015, from http://journalism.uoregon.edu/~tbivins/stratcomweb/readings/Framing_comp_new.pdf 4. UNODC on human trafficking and migrant smuggling. (2015, January 1). Retrieved May 1, 2015, from http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/human-trafficking/
  7. 7. Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 7 The Economist Sources 1. Everywhere in (supply) chains http://www.economist.com/news/international/21646199-how-reduce-bonded-labour- and-human-trafficking-everywhere-supply-chains 2. Slavery: Still trapped http://www.economist.com/news/international/21633585-governments-and-lobbies-still- need-fight-end-modern-day-slavery-still-trapped 3. Ranking the rankings http://www.economist.com/news/international/21631039-international-comparisons-are- popular-influentialand-sometimes-flawed-ranking-rankings 4. Human trafficking: Half a peg downward http://www.economist.com/blogs/banyan/2014/06/human-trafficking 5. Prostitution in Germany: A giant Teutonic brothel http://www.economist.com/news/europe/21589922-has-liberalisation-oldest-profession- gone-too-far-giant-teutonic-brothel 6. Daily chart: The scourge of enslavement http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2013/10/daily-chart-13 7. Religion and human trafficking: Freedom for the captives http://www.economist.com/blogs/erasmus/2013/04/religion-and-human-trafficking 8. Houses of torture http://www.economist.com/blogs/pomegranate/2013/12/human-trafficking-sinai 9. Turning off the red light http://www.economist.com/news/europe/21591220-new-law-will-make-paying-sex- crime-turning-red-light 10. A deadly cocktail http://www.economist.com/news/asia/21572800-long-standing-worker-abuses-get-some- serious-attention-deadly-cocktail 11. Vulnerable to abuse http://www.economist.com/blogs/pomegranate/2014/04/syrian-refugees 12. Here be monsters http://www.economist.com/news/international/21646200-thailands-fishing-industry-rife- trafficking-and-abuse-here-be-monsters 13. Lawless roads http://www.economist.com/node/14506444 14. Modern slavery http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2014/05/daily-chart-12 15. Carefully watched http://www.economist.com/blogs/pomegranate/2014/06/syrian-refugees-jordan 16. The world of human trafficking http://www.economist.com/node/21558468/mobile-frameless 17. Over the top http://www.economist.com/news/britain/21588362-perhaps-half-million-people-live- illegally-britain-governments-draconian-new 18. In the land of cotton http://www.economist.com/blogs/banyan/2013/10/forced-labour-uzbekistan
  8. 8. Modern Day Slavery: It Does Exist 8 19. Illegal markets http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2013/04/daily-chart-19 20. Big brother comes wooing http://www.economist.com/blogs/banyan?page=5

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