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INFOGRAPHICS
101By Kayli Kunkel
WHY INFOGRAPHICS?
On a daily basis, the average
American is bombarded with
five times more information
than he saw 15 years ago.
Our brains process visuals faster:
On average, it takes 50 seconds
to read 200-250 words but only
1/10 of a second to proc...
“The new Drake University
mascot, Griff, showed up to
the basketball game in a Drake
Bulldogs jersey and a pink
feathered ...
In a crowded media scene,
good graphics stand out.
Infographics are everywhere,
and also more scrutinized than
ever. They are easy to make;
not easy to make well.
CONTENT
WHAT WORKS
1. Listicles
—“10 workout myths, busted”
2. Timelines
	 —“Star Wars over the years”
3. Statistic-heavy informat...
Example:
Connecting random but
connected statistics in a
visual graphic that implies
an overarching trend.
Example:
Statistics better expressed visually than through text alone.
Example:
Aggregating variety
of statistics to
improve overall
conception of a
topic. “Myth vs. Fact”
format is popular and...
WHAT DOESN’T WORK
1. Weighty topics
—When you can’t/shouldn’t oversimplify in
few words, e.g. “Race relations in America”
...
PROCESS
1. Whittle down topic
—Decide on format, too
2. Gather relevant facts
—At this point, just a Word doc
—Record your sources...
Step 5: Mapping out design with sketches
WRITING
1. Brevity
—Be concise
2. Straightforward
—Use wordplay sparingly
3. Spell it out
—Draw conclusions for the reader
DESIGN
DIGITAL
PRINT
Horizontal format, CMYK color, higher
resolution (300dpi or print standard)
Vertical format for scrolling, R...
1. No more than 2-3 fonts
2. Simple, appropriate colors
—Color.adobe.com is useful
—Remember connotations:
red=urgency, gr...
K.I.S.S., the Golden Design Rule
“Keep it Simple, Stupid.”
Just because you can, doesn’t
mean you should.
Design with inte...
MISTAKES
TOO BUSY
UNCLEAR
UNNECESSARY
WRONG VISUALS
WORDY
RECAP
1. Report thoroughly.
2. Organize carefully.
3. Write concisely.
4. Design sparingly.
QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS?
Kayli Kunkel
kkunkel@lexiconcontentmarketing.com
How to Make Awesome Infographics
How to Make Awesome Infographics
How to Make Awesome Infographics
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How to Make Awesome Infographics

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You may want graphic content, but how do you make good infographics? Designer Kayli Kunkel explains what works and what doesn't when it comes to graphic depictions of data.

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How to Make Awesome Infographics

  1. 1. INFOGRAPHICS 101By Kayli Kunkel
  2. 2. WHY INFOGRAPHICS?
  3. 3. On a daily basis, the average American is bombarded with five times more information than he saw 15 years ago.
  4. 4. Our brains process visuals faster: On average, it takes 50 seconds to read 200-250 words but only 1/10 of a second to process a visual scene.
  5. 5. “The new Drake University mascot, Griff, showed up to the basketball game in a Drake Bulldogs jersey and a pink feathered boa.”
  6. 6. In a crowded media scene, good graphics stand out.
  7. 7. Infographics are everywhere, and also more scrutinized than ever. They are easy to make; not easy to make well.
  8. 8. CONTENT
  9. 9. WHAT WORKS 1. Listicles —“10 workout myths, busted” 2. Timelines —“Star Wars over the years” 3. Statistic-heavy information —Financial report 4. Visual information —“World’s tallest mountains”
  10. 10. Example: Connecting random but connected statistics in a visual graphic that implies an overarching trend.
  11. 11. Example: Statistics better expressed visually than through text alone.
  12. 12. Example: Aggregating variety of statistics to improve overall conception of a topic. “Myth vs. Fact” format is popular and easy to implement.
  13. 13. WHAT DOESN’T WORK 1. Weighty topics —When you can’t/shouldn’t oversimplify in few words, e.g. “Race relations in America” 2. Complicated topics —“How computers work” 3. Inconclusive/meaningless stats —“Celebrities’ favorite foods;” light topic, but no meaning or connection to draw
  14. 14. PROCESS
  15. 15. 1. Whittle down topic —Decide on format, too 2. Gather relevant facts —At this point, just a Word doc —Record your sources 3. Group similar facts 4. Weave into narrative 5. Map out design
  16. 16. Step 5: Mapping out design with sketches
  17. 17. WRITING
  18. 18. 1. Brevity —Be concise 2. Straightforward —Use wordplay sparingly 3. Spell it out —Draw conclusions for the reader
  19. 19. DESIGN
  20. 20. DIGITAL PRINT Horizontal format, CMYK color, higher resolution (300dpi or print standard) Vertical format for scrolling, RGB color (on mobile ensure larger text to avoid zooming)
  21. 21. 1. No more than 2-3 fonts 2. Simple, appropriate colors —Color.adobe.com is useful —Remember connotations: red=urgency, green=energy, blue=calm 3. Consider publication’s design
  22. 22. K.I.S.S., the Golden Design Rule “Keep it Simple, Stupid.” Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. Design with intention.
  23. 23. MISTAKES
  24. 24. TOO BUSY
  25. 25. UNCLEAR
  26. 26. UNNECESSARY
  27. 27. WRONG VISUALS
  28. 28. WORDY
  29. 29. RECAP
  30. 30. 1. Report thoroughly. 2. Organize carefully. 3. Write concisely. 4. Design sparingly.
  31. 31. QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS? Kayli Kunkel kkunkel@lexiconcontentmarketing.com

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