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©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Advocacy and The Academy:Advocacy and The Academy:
Making ChangeMaking Change
aa webin...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Your Presenter – Sean MooreYour Presenter – Sean Moore
 PrincipalPrincipal Advocacy S...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Today’Today’s Proposed Programs Proposed Program
Definitions / ConceptsDefinitions / ...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Definitions and ConceptsDefinitions and Concepts
 The “Art” and “Science” of Advocacy...
Two Paths of Constructive EngagementTwo Paths of Constructive Engagement
Policy EngagementPolicy Engagement
Partnering wit...
Other SettingsOther Settings
- Public Opinion / The “Media”Public Opinion / The “Media”
- Professional & Trade Association...
Other Types of Advocacy & EngagementOther Types of Advocacy & Engagement
Not the focus of this session, but possibly part ...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Common Complaints About AdvocatesCommon Complaints About Advocates
 only know one sid...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 9
 so many demands, so little time, limited resources;so many demands, so little time...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Who does lobbying / advocacy ?Who does lobbying / advocacy ?
 IndividualsIndividuals
...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Theories of Persuasion and InfluenceTheories of Persuasion and Influence
 CiceroCicer...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
““If you wish to persuade me, you must think myIf you wish to persuade me, you must th...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
CialdiniCialdini’s Principles of Persuasion’s Principles of Persuasion **
 Reciprocat...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Persuasion in AdvocacyPersuasion in Advocacy **
 ReciprocationReciprocation:: Favours...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
When Bad Things HappenWhen Bad Things Happen
to Good Ideasto Good Ideas
OrOr
Eight Rea...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
In Your Experience …In Your Experience …
 What are main reasons / factors in advocacy...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Eight Reasons Organizations Fail in theirEight Reasons Organizations Fail in their
Att...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Advocacy School
Assumptions About What WorksAssumptions About What Works
• Critical di...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Advocacy School
Assumptions (contAssumptions (cont’’d)d)
 effective advocacy / policy...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Effective Advocacy PracticesEffective Advocacy Practices
 Mapping (Mustard)Mapping (M...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
"To have the results you've never had ….."To have the results you've never had …..
you...
©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016
Sean MooreSean Moore
Principal, Advocacy SchoolPrincipal, Advocacy School
613-728-6024...
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RECODE WEBINAR: Advocacy and the Academy

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Wednesday, October 12th at 12pm EDT

Discussion with the Advocacy School's Sean Moore. Sean will share some of the benefits of advocating for a field, the challenges of doing so, and will share some examples of effective advocacy in the Canadian context.

More info @ re-code.ca/en/whats_happening/171
Listen to the webinar: https://vimeo.com/187243005

Published in: Education
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RECODE WEBINAR: Advocacy and the Academy

  1. 1. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Advocacy and The Academy:Advocacy and The Academy: Making ChangeMaking Change aa webinar prepared forwebinar prepared for RECODE – InnoweaveRECODE – Innoweave October 12, 2016October 12, 2016 Sean MooreSean Moore Advocacy SchoolAdvocacy School Advocacy School
  2. 2. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Your Presenter – Sean MooreYour Presenter – Sean Moore  PrincipalPrincipal Advocacy SchoolAdvocacy School ((www.advocacvschool.orgwww.advocacvschool.org ))  Former Partner / Public Policy AdvisorFormer Partner / Public Policy Advisor, Gowling Lafleur, Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLPHenderson LLP  30 years experience in Canada, US and abroad on public-30 years experience in Canada, US and abroad on public- policy advocacy, policy development and engagement atpolicy advocacy, policy development and engagement at local, state / provincial and national levelslocal, state / provincial and national levels  Worked in Ottawa, Washington and on foreign projects forWorked in Ottawa, Washington and on foreign projects for more than 3 decadesmore than 3 decades  Currently advises, coaches and trains leaders in all sectorsCurrently advises, coaches and trains leaders in all sectors in Canada and abroad on process and management ofin Canada and abroad on process and management of policy advocacy and engagementpolicy advocacy and engagement  Focus is on building individual and institutional capacityFocus is on building individual and institutional capacity in advocacy and policy engagementin advocacy and policy engagement Advocacy School
  3. 3. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Today’Today’s Proposed Programs Proposed Program Definitions / ConceptsDefinitions / Concepts Other SettingsOther Settings Who Does Lobbying / Advocacy and Why?Who Does Lobbying / Advocacy and Why? Elements of Influence and PersuasionElements of Influence and Persuasion When Bad Things Happen to Good Ideas” (When Bad Things Happen to Good Ideas” (MostMost Common Reasons Behind Advocacy FailureCommon Reasons Behind Advocacy Failure)) Assumptions About Effective AdvocacyAssumptions About Effective Advocacy Examples of Effective Advocacy PracticeExamples of Effective Advocacy Practice Advocacy School
  4. 4. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Definitions and ConceptsDefinitions and Concepts  The “Art” and “Science” of AdvocacyThe “Art” and “Science” of Advocacy  Public PolicyPublic Policy  Public-Policy AdvocacyPublic-Policy Advocacy ** • LobbyingLobbying • Government Relations / Public AffairsGovernment Relations / Public Affairs • Coalition BuildingCoalition Building • Grass Roots / Grass Tops Advocacy (&Grass Roots / Grass Tops Advocacy (& ““astroturf lobbyingastroturf lobbying””)) • Media StrategiesMedia Strategies  Policy EngagementPolicy Engagement Advocacy School
  5. 5. Two Paths of Constructive EngagementTwo Paths of Constructive Engagement Policy EngagementPolicy Engagement Partnering with government / practitioners or other stakeholdersPartnering with government / practitioners or other stakeholders in:in: 1)1)defining nature and scope of challenge/problemdefining nature and scope of challenge/problem 2)2)jointly consider alternativesjointly consider alternatives 3)3)collaborate in crafting and implementing a response / solutioncollaborate in crafting and implementing a response / solution Policy AdvocacyPolicy Advocacy In absence of a policy engagement opportunity, an intentional,In absence of a policy engagement opportunity, an intentional, proactive, strategic approach to gaining support for a change byproactive, strategic approach to gaining support for a change by exploring and promoting responses that achieve your missionexploring and promoting responses that achieve your mission while respecting needs and perspectives of decision makers andwhile respecting needs and perspectives of decision makers and other stakeholdersother stakeholders
  6. 6. Other SettingsOther Settings - Public Opinion / The “Media”Public Opinion / The “Media” - Professional & Trade AssociationsProfessional & Trade Associations - Delegated Authorities:Delegated Authorities: - Self-Regulating BodiesSelf-Regulating Bodies - Conservation AuthoritiesConservation Authorities - Police CommissionsPolice Commissions - Private and Non-Profit OrganizationsPrivate and Non-Profit Organizations - Chambers of CommerceChambers of Commerce - Labour UnionsLabour Unions - Faith-Based Institutions and OrganizationsFaith-Based Institutions and Organizations - University / College BoardsUniversity / College Boards
  7. 7. Other Types of Advocacy & EngagementOther Types of Advocacy & Engagement Not the focus of this session, but possibly part of laterNot the focus of this session, but possibly part of later stages of advocacy / engagement efforts:stages of advocacy / engagement efforts: Litigation (i.e. the courts)Litigation (i.e. the courts) Direct Action / Civil DisobedienceDirect Action / Civil Disobedience Grass Roots AdvocacyGrass Roots Advocacy News Media / Social Media StrategiesNews Media / Social Media Strategies (e.g. public awareness and fund raising; promotion(e.g. public awareness and fund raising; promotion and advertising)and advertising)
  8. 8. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Common Complaints About AdvocatesCommon Complaints About Advocates  only know one side of issueonly know one side of issue  little knowledge of broader perspectivelittle knowledge of broader perspective  fail to expand base of support for their propositionfail to expand base of support for their proposition  little idea of how government / institutions really worklittle idea of how government / institutions really work  submissions often too long – and unreadablesubmissions often too long – and unreadable  little or no practical “asks”little or no practical “asks”  heavy on “impressions” and “feelings” and light on facts,heavy on “impressions” and “feelings” and light on facts, datadata  no effective, compelling narrativeno effective, compelling narrative  lacking in “strategic sensibility”lacking in “strategic sensibility”  often little meaningful follow-up – frequently changingoften little meaningful follow-up – frequently changing their “asks” and then on to something elsetheir “asks” and then on to something else Advocacy School
  9. 9. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 9  so many demands, so little time, limited resources;so many demands, so little time, limited resources;  intensely rivalrous (for attention & resources)intensely rivalrous (for attention & resources)  daily fire-fighting environmentdaily fire-fighting environment  often chaotic, reactive decision-makingoften chaotic, reactive decision-making  frequently, policy decisions come out offrequently, policy decisions come out of transactional matterstransactional matters  highly risk averse officials (all the more so with newhighly risk averse officials (all the more so with new emphasis onemphasis on ““accountabilityaccountability””))  advocates need to practiceadvocates need to practice ““do-it-yourselfdo-it-yourself”” publicpublic policypolicy Reality Check: Decision-Making in Government Advocacy School
  10. 10. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Who does lobbying / advocacy ?Who does lobbying / advocacy ?  IndividualsIndividuals  Neighbourhood and Community AssociationsNeighbourhood and Community Associations  CorporationsCorporations  Professional Associations and UnionsProfessional Associations and Unions  Industry AssociationsIndustry Associations  Community-based Organizations and Non-profitsCommunity-based Organizations and Non-profits  CharitiesCharities  Advocacy Groups: ExamplesAdvocacy Groups: Examples • NRANRA • AAAAAA • Sierra ClubSierra Club  Faith-based OrganizationsFaith-based Organizations  Governments (domestic, foreign and intra-government)Governments (domestic, foreign and intra-government) Advocacy School
  11. 11. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Theories of Persuasion and InfluenceTheories of Persuasion and Influence  CiceroCicero  Saul AlinskySaul Alinsky  Jim DinningJim Dinning  Robert CialdiniRobert Cialdini Advocacy School
  12. 12. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 ““If you wish to persuade me, you must think myIf you wish to persuade me, you must think my thoughts, feel my feelings and speak my words.”thoughts, feel my feelings and speak my words.” CiceroCicero ““CommunicateCommunicate within the experiencewithin the experience of thoseof those with whom you are trying to communicate.”with whom you are trying to communicate.” Saul AlinskySaul Alinsky ““Bring me something I can say ‘yes’ to.”Bring me something I can say ‘yes’ to.” Jim DinningJim Dinning Advocacy School
  13. 13. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 CialdiniCialdini’s Principles of Persuasion’s Principles of Persuasion **  ReciprocationReciprocation. People are more willing to comply with requests (for. People are more willing to comply with requests (for favors, services, information, concessions, etc.) from those who havefavors, services, information, concessions, etc.) from those who have provided such things first.provided such things first.  Commitment/ConsistencyCommitment/Consistency. People are more willing to be moved in a. People are more willing to be moved in a particular direction if they see it as consistent with an existingparticular direction if they see it as consistent with an existing commitment.commitment.  AuthorityAuthority. People are more willing to follow the directions or. People are more willing to follow the directions or recommendations of a communicator to whom they attribute relevantrecommendations of a communicator to whom they attribute relevant authority or expertise.authority or expertise.  Social ValidationSocial Validation. People are more willing to take a recommended. People are more willing to take a recommended action if they see evidence that many others, especially similar others,action if they see evidence that many others, especially similar others, are taking it.are taking it.  ScarcityScarcity. People find objects and opportunities more attractive to the. People find objects and opportunities more attractive to the degree that they are scarce, rare, or dwindling in availability.degree that they are scarce, rare, or dwindling in availability.  Liking/FriendshipLiking/Friendship. People prefer to say yes to those they know and. People prefer to say yes to those they know and like.like. ** Robert B. Cialdini (Robert B. Cialdini (Influence: Science and PracticeInfluence: Science and Practice, Allyn and Bacon 2001), Allyn and Bacon 2001) Advocacy School
  14. 14. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Persuasion in AdvocacyPersuasion in Advocacy **  ReciprocationReciprocation:: FavoursFavours don't have to be tangible gifts. In today's world, useful information or help with one of their priority problems is one of the most valuable favours you can deliver. How can you help them?  Commitment and Consistency: Once people have made a choice or taken a stand, they are under both internal and external pressure to behave consistently with that commitment. Build on small successes and modest requests.  Social proof: When you can show them what others like them believe or are doing, people are more likely to take the same action (e.g. other governments)  Authority: Cite authoritative sources to support your ideas. Enlist experts or others with standing to support and speak on your behalf  Scarcity: The possibility of losing something is a more powerful motivator than of gaining something. Is your “proposition” an opportunity that should not be missed?  Like: You have established a comfort level, familiarity, and a history with them. Don’t lecture or hector; maintain contact ** Applying framework and principles ofApplying framework and principles of Robert B. CialdiniRobert B. Cialdini Advocacy School
  15. 15. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 When Bad Things HappenWhen Bad Things Happen to Good Ideasto Good Ideas OrOr Eight Reasons Organizations Fail inEight Reasons Organizations Fail in Their Attempts to Influence GovernmentTheir Attempts to Influence Government Advocacy School
  16. 16. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 In Your Experience …In Your Experience …  What are main reasons / factors in advocacyWhat are main reasons / factors in advocacy failure which you are familiar with?failure which you are familiar with?  What are the main obstacles in advocacy /What are the main obstacles in advocacy / lobbying for:lobbying for: • NGOs / Non profits?NGOs / Non profits? • Corporations (Big and small)?Corporations (Big and small)? • Community associations?Community associations? Advocacy School
  17. 17. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Eight Reasons Organizations Fail in theirEight Reasons Organizations Fail in their Attempts to Influence GovernmentAttempts to Influence Government  Ask for the Wrong ThingAsk for the Wrong Thing  Don’t Understand How Decisions Get MadeDon’t Understand How Decisions Get Made  Don’Don’t Have a Championt Have a Champion inin GovernmentGovernment  Lack of Compelling “Narrative” and DataLack of Compelling “Narrative” and Data  Started Too Late / Quit Too SoonStarted Too Late / Quit Too Soon  Don’Don’t Help Decision-Maker Think It Throught Help Decision-Maker Think It Through  Failed to Broaden Base of SupportFailed to Broaden Base of Support  Proponents’ / Advocates’ Lack of AppropriateProponents’ / Advocates’ Lack of Appropriate Resources, Management and GovernanceResources, Management and Governance StructuresStructures Advocacy School
  18. 18. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Advocacy School Assumptions About What WorksAssumptions About What Works • Critical dimensions of effective advocacyCritical dimensions of effective advocacy  ““mindset”mindset”  preparation:preparation:  insight into context (i.e. “Strategic Inquiry”)insight into context (i.e. “Strategic Inquiry”)  empathy with “target(s)”empathy with “target(s)”  getting your “ask” rightgetting your “ask” right  understanding resistanceunderstanding resistance  advocacy material that is useful (DIY)advocacy material that is useful (DIY)  ““champion or sponsor”champion or sponsor” withinwithin governmentgovernment  properly resourced and manageproperly resourced and manage  mindful of principles of persuasion and influencemindful of principles of persuasion and influence  sometimessometimes there is NO hope with existing playersthere is NO hope with existing players
  19. 19. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Advocacy School Assumptions (contAssumptions (cont’’d)d)  effective advocacy / policy engagement often a consequence of:effective advocacy / policy engagement often a consequence of: • luck –luck – ““the right issue at the right timethe right issue at the right time”” • preparation – i.e. readiness to exploit opportunity / luckpreparation – i.e. readiness to exploit opportunity / luck • broad understanding of the issue and the political and publicbroad understanding of the issue and the political and public policy context in which it exists (“strategic inquiry”)policy context in which it exists (“strategic inquiry”) • relevance of your objective to therelevance of your objective to the ““targetstargets’”’” needs, priorities,needs, priorities, context, constraintscontext, constraints • ability to provide tangible, practical, useful assistance toability to provide tangible, practical, useful assistance to those in governmentthose in government • ability to mobilize supportability to mobilize support • ability to produce tools and products of government (ability to produce tools and products of government (““do-it-do-it- yourself public policyyourself public policy””) decision-making) decision-making • focus, stamina, persistence, resiliencefocus, stamina, persistence, resilience • civility, likeabilitycivility, likeability
  20. 20. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Effective Advocacy PracticesEffective Advocacy Practices  Mapping (Mustard)Mapping (Mustard)  Strategic Inquiry (Big Municipal Gov’t)Strategic Inquiry (Big Municipal Gov’t)  DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Public Policy (PLAN)DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Public Policy (PLAN)  Key Contact Program (School Board)Key Contact Program (School Board) Advocacy School
  21. 21. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 "To have the results you've never had ….."To have the results you've never had ….. you must do what you've never done.you must do what you've never done. Pierre Ducasse & Thomas JeffersonPierre Ducasse & Thomas Jefferson “If you do what you’ve always done,“If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.”you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.” Tony RobbinsTony Robbins Advocacy School
  22. 22. ©© Sean Moore, 2016Sean Moore, 2016 Sean MooreSean Moore Principal, Advocacy SchoolPrincipal, Advocacy School 613-728-6024613-728-6024 613-794-1114 (mobile)613-794-1114 (mobile) sean.moore@advocacyschool.orgsean.moore@advocacyschool.org www.advocacyschool.orgwww.advocacyschool.org www.seanmoore.cawww.seanmoore.ca dd Advocacy School

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