Taking Notes: Fast and Easy

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When you read it's very useful to take notes of the important information. However, it's important to take good notes. Here's a brief but very useful explanation on how to take good notes when you're reading.

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Taking Notes: Fast and Easy

  1. 1. Organize yourself. have a pack of Post-It notes at hand 1
  2. 2. Think about... You want to retain. Takenotes Writtinga novel 2
  3. 3. Focus on... recording information that is new to you3
  4. 4. Create a system of note-taking separating your notes into different sections 4
  5. 5. Write in English. write a word or phrase you don’t understand, then search it on dictionary. 5
  6. 6. Use short phrases and abbreviate. Don’t write complete paragraphs or words you don’t understand. 6
  7. 7. Highlight key words and phrases. …Make the important things stand out. 7
  8. 8. Use meaningful symbols Symbols like arrows, dots, boxes, diagrams, charts, and other visual notes 8
  9. 9. Use some inside jokes, This will alleviate the monotony of reading them. 9
  10. 10. Return to the notes later. …go back when the topics are fresh in your mind. 10
  11. 11. JanetEchelman
  12. 12. Glossary breathing unlikely cutting-edge shifts reshapes lectureship shipped casters bundling approach Hoisting recognized woven strives tied strengthening Respiración improbable De vanguardia Turno remodelamientos puesto de profesor transportado ruedas Agrupación enfoque izado conocido tejida se esfuerza atado fortalecimiento
  13. 13. Takenotes
  14. 14. Questions
  15. 15. http://www.wikihow.com/Take-Better-Notes http://classroom.synonym.com/good-notes-book-4846.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAhRf3U50lM
  16. 16. Janet Echelman builds living, breathing sculpture environments that respond to the forces of nature — wind, water and light — and become inviting focal points for civic life. Exploring the potential of unlikely materials, from fishing net to atomized water particles, Echelman combines ancient craft with cutting-edge technology to create her permanent sculpture at the scale of buildings. Experiential in nature, the result is sculpture that shifts from being an object you look at, to something you can get lost in. Recent prominent works include: “Her Secret is Patience” spanning two city blocks in downtown Phoenix, “Water Sky Garden” which premiered for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics, “She Changes” on the waterfront in Porto, Portugal, and “Every Beating Second” in San Francisco Airport’s new Terminal Two. Recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship, Echelman was named an Architectural Digest 2012 Innovator for “changing the very essence of urban spaces.” Her TED talk “Taking Imagination Seriously” has been translated into 34 languages and is estimated to have been viewed by more than a million people worldwide. Biography
  17. 17. Artist’s story American artist Janet Echelman reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. Echelman first set out to be an artist after graduating college. She moved to Hong Kong in 1987 to study Chinese calligraphy and brush-painting. Later she moved to Bali, Indonesia, where she collaborated with artisans to combine traditional textile methods with contemporary painting. When she lost her bamboo house in Bali to a fire, Echelman returned to the United States and began teaching at Harvard. After seven years as an Artist-in- Residence, she returned to Asia, embarking on a Fulbright lectureship in India. With the promise to give painting exhibitions around the country, she shipped her paints to Mahabalipuram, a fishing village famous for sculpture. When her paints never arrived, Echelman, inspired by the local materials and culture, began working with bronze casters in the village. She soon found the material too heavy and expensive for her Fulbright budget. While watching local fishermen bundling their nets one evening, Echelman began wondering if nets could be a new approach to sculpture: a way to create volumetric form without heavy, solid materials. Today Echelman has constructed net sculpture environments in metropolitan cities around the world. She sees public art as a team sport and collaborates with a range of professionals including aeronautical and mechanical engineers, architects, lighting designers, landscape architects, and fabricators. She built her studio beside her hundred-year-old house, where she lives with her husband David Feldman and their two children.
  18. 18. Studio Statement Studio Echelman explores the cutting edge of sculpture, public art, and urban transformation. Assembled and led by internationally recognized sculptor Janet Echelman, the design team focuses on the development and creation of large-scale artworks. The permanent and temporary projects draw inspiration from ancient craft and modern technology. Using materials from woven fiber to atomized mist, the studio creates living, breathing pieces that respond to the forces of nature — wind, water and light. By combining meaning with physical form, it strives to create a visceral experience in diverse city environments, accessible to all. These sculpture environments embody local identity and invite residents to form a personal and dynamic relationship with the art and place. Each project becomes intimately tied to its environment through the use of local materials and working methods, thus strengthening neighborhood connections and promoting a distinctive civic character. The design team spans the globe. Studio Echelman is privileged to collaborate with brilliant aeronautical and mechanical engineers, architects, lighting designers, landscape architects, and fabricators.
  19. 19. Questions 1 ¿El movimiento de sus esculturas que representa? ¿Qué nombramiento recibió en 2012? Menciona tres de sus recientes trabajos Questions 2 ¿A que responden sus esculturas? ¿Qué material utilizo para darle un nuevo enfoque a la escultura creando formas volumétricas sin materiales pesados, solidos? Menciona tres especialistas con los que colabora para realizar sus instalaciones Questions 3 ¿En que se centra el equipo de diseño? ¿en que se inspiran sus proyectos temporales y permanentes? Menciona tres especialistas con los que colabora el estudio para realizar sus instalaciones
  20. 20. Biography Janet Echelman builds living, breathing sculpture environments that respond to the forces of nature — wind, water and light — and become inviting focal points for civic life. Exploring the potential of unlikely materials, from fishing net to atomized water particles, Echelman combines ancient craft with cutting-edge technology to create her permanent sculpture at the scale of buildings. Experiential in nature, the result is sculpture that shifts from being an object you look at, to something you can get lost in. Recent prominent works include: “Her Secret is Patience” spanning two city blocks in downtown Phoenix, “Water Sky Garden” which premiered for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics, “She Changes” on the waterfront in Porto, Portugal, and “Every Beating Second” in San Francisco Airport’s new Terminal Two. Recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship, Echelman was named an Architectural Digest 2012 Innovator for “changing the very essence of urban spaces.” Her TED talk “Taking Imagination Seriously” has been translated into 34 languages and is estimated to have been viewed by more than a million people worldwide. Studio Statement Studio Echelman explores the cutting edge of sculpture, public art, and urban transformation. Assembled and led by internationally recognized sculptor Janet Echelman, the design team focuses on the development and creation of large-scale artworks. The permanent and temporary projects draw inspiration from ancient craft and modern technology. Using materials from woven fiber to atomized mist, the studio creates living, breathing pieces that respond to the forces of nature — wind, water and light. By combining meaning with physical form, it strives to create a visceral experience in diverse city environments, accessible to all. These sculpture environments embody local identity and invite residents to form a personal and dynamic relationship with the art and place. Each project becomes intimately tied to its environment through the use of local materials and working methods, thus strengthening neighborhood connections and promoting a distinctive civic character. The design team spans the globe. Studio Echelman is privileged to collaborate with brilliant aeronautical and mechanical engineers, architects, lighting designers, landscape architects, and fabricators.
  21. 21. Artist’s Story American artist Janet Echelman reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. Echelman first set out to be an artist after graduating college. She moved to Hong Kong in 1987 to study Chinese calligraphy and brush- painting. Later she moved to Bali, Indonesia, where she collaborated with artisans to combine traditional textile methods with contemporary painting. When she lost her bamboo house in Bali to a fire, Echelman returned to the United States and began teaching at Harvard. After seven years as an Artist- in-Residence, she returned to Asia, embarking on a Fulbright lectureship in India. With the promise to give painting exhibitions around the country, she shipped her paints to Mahabalipuram, a fishing village famous for sculpture. When her paints never arrived, Echelman, inspired by the local materials and culture, began working with bronze casters in the village. She soon found the material too heavy and expensive for her Fulbright budget. While watching local fishermen bundling their nets one evening, Echelman began wondering if nets could be a new approach to sculpture: a way to create volumetric form without heavy, solid materials. Today Echelman has constructed net sculpture environments in metropolitan cities around the world. She sees public art as a team sport and collaborates with a range of professionals including aeronautical and mechanical engineers, architects, lighting designers, landscape architects, and fabricators. She built her studio beside her hundred-year-old house, where she lives with her husband David Feldman and their two children.

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