Exploring a Medical Career Leslie Hutchins, MS4 The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School  Resources: Aamc.org &...
Am I the right kind of person for a medical career? <ul><li>Ask yourself some questions: </li></ul><ul><li>Do I care deepl...
How Do I Know if a Medical Career is Right for Me? <ul><li>Service </li></ul><ul><li>Action </li></ul><ul><li>Respect </li...
What is a physician’s career like? Few fields offer a wider variety of opportunities! Most physicians’ professional lives ...
Other responsibilities…. <ul><li>Physician researchers are at work today developing exciting new treatment for cancer, gen...
Primary Care Physicians <ul><li>These are the 1 st  doctors people consult for medical care. </li></ul><ul><li>They are tr...
Specialists <ul><li>Specialist physicians differ from generalists in that they focus on a particular system or  part  of t...
What is Medical School Really Like? <ul><li>FIRST YEAR CURRICULUM </li></ul><ul><li>Fall Semester </li></ul><ul><li>Medica...
<ul><li>SECOND YEAR CURRICULUM: </li></ul><ul><li>Pathology, Microbiology, Clinical Medicine, & Pharmacology  </li></ul><u...
Study Room Pager System
<ul><li>THIRD YEAR CURRICULUM </li></ul><ul><li>Psychiatry (6 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Obstetrics and Gynecology (6 weeks)...
 
 
Entering Class UTSW2006 Profile Average Undergraduate GPA:  3.73 Average Science GPA:  3.66 GPA Range:  3.00 to 4.00 COLLE...
College Majors <ul><li>COLLEGE MAJORS Biology/Microbiology - 96 Biochemistry - 26 Engineering - 22 Humanities/Fine Arts - ...
Medical School Admission  Course Requirements <ul><li>BIOLOGY Two years as required for science majors. </li></ul><ul><li>...
Evaluation of Applicants <ul><li>   •  Scores on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT)    • Academic performance in c...
How do I select the right school for my premedical education? <ul><li>Does the school have a good faculty and a reputation...
78 undergraduate institutions are represented in the entering class. Bold type indicates schools represented by three or m...
<ul><li>Texas A&M University Texas A&M International University Texas Christian University Texas State University Texas Te...
You get paged at midnight…. <ul><li>The nurse tells you that your Mr. R’s urine has been less than 30cc for the past two h...
<ul><li>You are concerned that he is now septic because he was found to have a bacteria infection in his blood two days ag...
<ul><li>You start pressors (drugs to increase his BP). </li></ul><ul><li>You place the patient in Trendelenburg Position. ...
The nurse pages you again at 2 AM <ul><li>The patient’s urinary output is still low. </li></ul><ul><li>His BP is dropping ...
It shows….
Your admitting a patient…. <ul><li>Your team picks up a new patient transferred from the MICU. </li></ul><ul><li>Your new ...
<ul><li>Blood cultures sent off when she first came into the hospital grew Strep Bovis. </li></ul><ul><li>This type of inf...
Your Team Finds…. <ul><li>You convince your resident to order a transesophageal echo and colonoscopy for your patient. </l...
Pituitary Adenoma 45 year old female presents with headache and visual loss.
Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM)
Winking Owl
Subdural Hematoma
Epidural Hematoma
Underlying Skull Fracture
Headaches & Gait Difficulty
Pilocytic Astrocytoma
Next 7 years of training….
 
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Exploring A Medical Career

  1. 1. Exploring a Medical Career Leslie Hutchins, MS4 The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School Resources: Aamc.org & Utsouthwestern.edu
  2. 2. Am I the right kind of person for a medical career? <ul><li>Ask yourself some questions: </li></ul><ul><li>Do I care deeply about other people, their problems, and their pain? Do I enjoy helping people with my skills and knowledge? </li></ul><ul><li>Do I enjoy learning, gaining new understanding? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Do I often dig deeper into a subject than my teacher requires? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do I understand the value of learning beyond just making good grades? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Am I interested in how the human body functions? </li></ul><ul><li>Am I intrigued by the ways medicine can be used to improve life? </li></ul><ul><li>If you answered &quot;Yes&quot; to most of these questions, chances are you have the right kind of personality for a medical career. </li></ul>
  3. 3. How Do I Know if a Medical Career is Right for Me? <ul><li>Service </li></ul><ul><li>Action </li></ul><ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>Security </li></ul><ul><li>Excitement </li></ul><ul><li>Mobility </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibility </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is a physician’s career like? Few fields offer a wider variety of opportunities! Most physicians’ professional lives are filled with caring for patients and their families as well as continuously learning more about the human body.
  5. 5. Other responsibilities…. <ul><li>Physician researchers are at work today developing exciting new treatment for cancer, genetic disorders, and infectious diseases. </li></ul><ul><li>Academic physicians share their skills and wisdom by teaching medical students and residents. </li></ul><ul><li>Others work with health maintenance organizations, pharmaceutical companies, medical device manufacturers, health insurance companies, or in corporations directing health and safety programs. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Primary Care Physicians <ul><li>These are the 1 st doctors people consult for medical care. </li></ul><ul><li>They are trained to provide the wide range of services children and adults needed. </li></ul><ul><li>When patients’ specific health needs require further treatment, general physicians send them to see a specialist physician. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Specialists <ul><li>Specialist physicians differ from generalists in that they focus on a particular system or part of the body. </li></ul><ul><li>They work together with general physicians to ensure that patients receive treatment for specific medical problems as well as complete and comprehensive care throughout life. </li></ul>
  8. 8. What is Medical School Really Like? <ul><li>FIRST YEAR CURRICULUM </li></ul><ul><li>Fall Semester </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Biochemistry (14 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Human Anatomy (18 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Clinical Ethics in Medicine (16 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Embryology (3 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Genetics (5 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Spring Semester </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Neuroscience (9 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Human Behavior and Psychopathology (15 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Physiology (7 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Biology of Cells and Tissues (8 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Endocrinology and Human Reproduction (4 weeks) </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>SECOND YEAR CURRICULUM: </li></ul><ul><li>Pathology, Microbiology, Clinical Medicine, & Pharmacology </li></ul><ul><li>Fall Semester </li></ul><ul><li>General Principles (12 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Cardiovascular System (2 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Hematopoietic and Lymphoreticular Systems (2 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Respiratory System (3 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Gastrointestinal System (3.5 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Spring Semester </li></ul><ul><li>Renal/Urinary System (2 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Musculoskeletal System (1 week) </li></ul><ul><li>Endocrine System (1.5 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Reproductive System (1.5 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems (3 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Skin and Related Connective Tissue (1.25 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Extremes of Life (1week) </li></ul><ul><li>Toxicology (1 week) </li></ul><ul><li>Multisystem Disorders (1 week) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Study Room Pager System
  11. 11. <ul><li>THIRD YEAR CURRICULUM </li></ul><ul><li>Psychiatry (6 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Obstetrics and Gynecology (6 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Internal Medicine (12 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Family Medicine (4 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Neurology Clerkship (4 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Surgery (8 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>FOURTH YEAR CURRICULUM </li></ul><ul><li>Acute Care Clerkship (4 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Ambulatory Care Clerkship (4 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Internal Medicine Subinternship (4 weeks) </li></ul><ul><li>Four Electives (4 weeks each) </li></ul><ul><li>Advanced Cardiac Life Support (2 weeks) </li></ul>
  12. 14. Entering Class UTSW2006 Profile Average Undergraduate GPA:  3.73 Average Science GPA:  3.66 GPA Range:  3.00 to 4.00 COLLEGE GPA Average MCAT score:  32.2 Biological Science:  11.2 Physical Science:  10.9 Verbal Reasoning: 10.1 Writing Sample:  Q MCAT Score Range:  22 to 42 MCAT 8% - African American 27% - Asian/Pacific Islander 20% - Hispanic 4% - Other/Unreported 41% - White ETHNICITY 12% - 21 years old or younger 62% - 22 to 23 years old 15% - 24 to 25 years old 7% - 26 to 28 years old 4% - 29 years old or older 27% of the 2006 class delayed applying to/entering medical school at least one year from college graduation. AGE 48% women 52% men GENDER
  13. 15. College Majors <ul><li>COLLEGE MAJORS Biology/Microbiology - 96 Biochemistry - 26 Engineering - 22 Humanities/Fine Arts - 16 Chemistry - 15 Psychology - 15 Business - 14 Pre-Med Major - 11 Honors Program - 10 Foreign Language - 10 Other Social Science - 9 Neuroscience - 7 Economics - 6 Physics/Biophysics - 4 Mathematics - 3 79% - Science/Engineering Majors 21% - Non-Science Majors 16% - Double Majors </li></ul>
  14. 16. Medical School Admission Course Requirements <ul><li>BIOLOGY Two years as required for science majors. </li></ul><ul><li>CHEMISTRY One year of general (inorganic) chemistry & one year of organic chemistry as required for science majors. </li></ul><ul><li>ENGLISH One year of college English. </li></ul><ul><li>MATHEMATICS One-half year of college calculus or statistics. </li></ul><ul><li>PHYSICS One year as required for science majors. </li></ul>
  15. 17. Evaluation of Applicants <ul><li>   • Scores on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT)    • Academic performance in college as reflected in the GPA    • The rigor of the undergraduate curriculum    • Recommendations    • Extracurricular activities    • Socioeconomic background    • Any time spent in outside employment    • Personal integrity and compassion for others    • The applicant's motivation for a career in medicine </li></ul>
  16. 18. How do I select the right school for my premedical education? <ul><li>Does the school have a good faculty and a reputation for high academic standards? Does it offer a broad range of courses in the humanities and in the social, behavioral, and natural sciences? </li></ul><ul><li>Does it have strong science departments with good laboratory facilities? </li></ul><ul><li>Does it offer all of the required courses I need for acceptance to medical school? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the college have a designated advisor specifically trained to help students interested in the health professions? </li></ul><ul><li>Does it have a good track record for having its students accepted to medical school? </li></ul><ul><li>Does it offer extracurricular activities that appeal to me? Are there programs to do volunteer work at local hospitals or clinics? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there programs where I can demonstrate leadership and compassion? </li></ul><ul><li>Does it feel right for me? Am I comfortable with its size, location, social life, and general atmosphere? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it affordable for me and my family? </li></ul><ul><li>As you select a college remember that just as in high school, a good liberal arts education is a key ingredient to becoming a physician. You'll need a strong foundation in mathematics and the sciences that relate most to medicine: biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics. But it's important for your college experience to be broad. Taking courses in the humanities or liberal arts will help you prepare for the &quot;people&quot; side of medicine . </li></ul>
  17. 19. 78 undergraduate institutions are represented in the entering class. Bold type indicates schools represented by three or more students.  Austin College Baylor University Brigham Young University Brown University Carlton College Carnegie Mellon University Columbia University Cornell University Dallas Baptist University Dartmouth College Duke University Emory University Florida Atlantic University Florida State University Georgetown University Georgia Institute of Technology Grinnell College Hampton University Harvard University Johns Hopkins University Lamar University Massachusetts Institute of Technology Morehouse College New York University Northwestern University Oral Roberts University Oregon State University Providence College Rice University Southern Methodist University Southwestern University St. John's College St. Louis University Stanford University COLLEGES
  18. 20. <ul><li>Texas A&M University Texas A&M International University Texas Christian University Texas State University Texas Tech University Trinity University Tulane University University of California, Berkeley University of California, San Diego University of Chicago University of Colorado, Boulder University of Dallas University of Georgia Univeristy of Houston, University Park University of Idaho University of Maryland University of Michigan University of Notre Dame University of North Texas University of Pennsylvania University of South Florida University of San Diego University of St. Thomas (Tx) University of Tennessee University of Texas at Arlington University of Texas at Austin University of Texas at Dallas University of Texas, Pan American University of Texas at San Antonio University of Texas at Tyler University of Tulsa University of Virginia Vanderbilt University Washington and Lee University Washington University, St. Louis Westmont College Williamette University Xavier University Yale University </li></ul>
  19. 21. You get paged at midnight…. <ul><li>The nurse tells you that your Mr. R’s urine has been less than 30cc for the past two hours and his blood pressure is now 80/40 (low). </li></ul>
  20. 22. <ul><li>You are concerned that he is now septic because he was found to have a bacteria infection in his blood two days ago. </li></ul><ul><li>However, the nurse tells you he is not running a fever. </li></ul>
  21. 23. <ul><li>You start pressors (drugs to increase his BP). </li></ul><ul><li>You place the patient in Trendelenburg Position. </li></ul><ul><li>You send off blood cultures to rule out infection. </li></ul>
  22. 24. The nurse pages you again at 2 AM <ul><li>The patient’s urinary output is still low. </li></ul><ul><li>His BP is dropping evening with medication & positioning. </li></ul><ul><li>You go to the patient’s bedside to re-evaluate the situation. </li></ul><ul><li>You realize that now you hear wheezing in his lungs. </li></ul><ul><li>You decide to order a Chest X-Ray. </li></ul>
  23. 25. It shows….
  24. 26. Your admitting a patient…. <ul><li>Your team picks up a new patient transferred from the MICU. </li></ul><ul><li>Your new patient is a fifty year-old mentally retarded individual who was “found down & unresponsive” in her home. </li></ul><ul><li>She was given antibiotics and IV fluids in the ICU and improved enough to be transferred to the floor. </li></ul><ul><li>Due to her mental state she is unable to tell you what happened to her or any symptoms of her illness. </li></ul>
  25. 27. <ul><li>Blood cultures sent off when she first came into the hospital grew Strep Bovis. </li></ul><ul><li>This type of infection is linked to endocarditis (infection of the heart valves) as well as colon cancer. </li></ul><ul><li>However, your patient had a transthoraic echo on admission and endocarditis was ruled out so your resident doesn’t think it needs to be worked up more. </li></ul><ul><li>The catch is you know a transesophageal echo is more sensitive in catching a mitral valve lesion. </li></ul>
  26. 28. Your Team Finds…. <ul><li>You convince your resident to order a transesophageal echo and colonoscopy for your patient. </li></ul>
  27. 29. Pituitary Adenoma 45 year old female presents with headache and visual loss.
  28. 30. Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM)
  29. 31. Winking Owl
  30. 32. Subdural Hematoma
  31. 33. Epidural Hematoma
  32. 34. Underlying Skull Fracture
  33. 35. Headaches & Gait Difficulty
  34. 36. Pilocytic Astrocytoma
  35. 37. Next 7 years of training….

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