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Area of study guide to narrative writing

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narrative writing and rubric statements

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Area of study guide to narrative writing

  1. 1. Area of Study (AOS): Discovery An Introduction
  2. 2. THE RUBRIC… Prescriptions: http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_hsc/pdf_doc/english-prescriptions-2015-20.pdf This Area of Study requires students to explore the waysin which the concept of discoveryis represented in and through texts. • Go Back to Where You Come From • ORT – Other Related Texts • Creative/Imaginative Writing • Unseen Texts • Techniques • Language forms and features • Context
  3. 3. Discovery as a concept? Breaking it down: o How texts affirm/confirm attitudes and beliefs o How texts challenge attitudes and beliefs o Composing a wide range of texts – you may be asked to respond in various text types and forms i.e. creative, essay, speech, short answer… o Responding to a wide range of texts – various texts from various textual forms i.e. poetry, drama, film, prose… o Discoveries can be made about: • People • Relationships • Societies • Places • Events • Ideas o Ways – Techniques, language modes, forms, features… o Students make their own discoveries when analysing texts o Explore the process of discovery through various techniques
  4. 4. Discoveries can: • be new discoveries - Discoveries can encompass the experience of discovering something for the first time • be rediscoveries something that has been lost, forgotten or concealed (hidden) • be sudden and unexpected • emerge from a process of deliberate and careful planning • be evoked by curiosity and wonder Discovery as a concept?
  5. 5. • be confronting and provocative • lead us to new worlds • establish new values • stimulate new ideas • enable us to speculate about future possibilities • offer new understandings and renewed perceptions of ourselves and others. • vary according to personal, cultural, historical and social contexts and values. • be far-reaching and transformative for the individual and for broader society. • may be questioned or challenged when viewed from different perspectives • their worth may be reassessed over time • the ramifications of particular discoveries may differ for individuals and their worlds
  6. 6. What students have to do… In their responses and compositions, students examine, question, and reflect and speculate on: • their own experiences of discovery • the experience of discovery (and discovering) in and through their engagement with texts • assumptions underlying various representations of the concept of discovery • how the concept of discovery is conveyed through the representations of: • people • relationships • Societies • places • events • ideas that they encounter in the prescribed text and other related texts of their own choosing • how the composer’s choice of language modes, forms, features and structure shapes representations of discovery and discovering • the ways in which exploring the concept of discovery may broaden and deepen their understanding of themselves and their world.
  7. 7. Discovery Rubric in Summary Rubric says consider ‘the ways in which the concept of Discovery is represented in and through texts’ Consider: • discovery and rediscovery • discovery may be planned or unplanned evoked by curiosity, necessity, wonder leading to new: • worlds, values and ideas • understandings and renewed perceptions of ourselves, others and the world • can enable us to speculate about future possibilities • can be, emotional, creative, intellectual, physical and spiritual • can vary according to personal, cultural, historical and social contexts and values • can be confronting and challenging Impact of Discoveries • may be transformative for the individual and broader society • can be questioned or challenged when viewed from different perspectives • may be reassessed over time
  8. 8. Stages of Discovery Discovery is a process – whether expected or unexpected, abstract or actual.
  9. 9. Triggers •What lead to the discovery? What started the process? What has motivated the discovery? What was the catalyst? •Had something been hidden, lost, concealed or forgotten? •Was it sudden and unexpected or deliberately and carefully planned? •Was it sparked by desire, curiosity, wonder or out of necessity? •Were there any intrinsic or extrinsic influences, personal, cultural, social, historical, values and beliefs? •What values, beliefs or attitudes did the individual have before the discovery? Experiences •Was this a new discovery or a rediscovery? Was it a rediscovery that involved reassessing? Was the discovery reassessed overtime? •What were the meaningful experiences? What were the fresh, emotional, physical, intellectual and/or spiritual experiences? •What was discovered? Were new worlds, new ideas, new attitudes, new beliefs, new understandings, new opportunities discovered? •What type of discovery was made, personal, cultural, physical, intellectual, spiritual? Was it a self-discovery or a physical discovery? •Were discoveries made about individuals, peoples, places, societies, relationships, events, new knowledge? •Have previously held values, beliefs, attitude been challenged or affirmed? Was anything confronting, provocative, challenging, daunting, difficult transformative or cathartic? Consequences •What was the impact/ramifications of the discovery? Were they far-reaching? How far-reaching? Were the consequences long-term or short-term? •Were the consequences positive, negative, neutral? Did they effect individuals, relationships, the boarder society? •What new insights, values, beliefs, attitudes, outlook and perspectives were gained? Were any of these challenged or affirmed? •Did the experience offer a sense of rejuvenation, a sense of redemption? Did the discovery lead to a re-evaluation of self or others? Did the discovery lead to a transformation or altered perspectives? •Have experience lead to future speculations and future possibilities? •Did the text contain a moral or didactic message for the responder to discover?
  10. 10. Responding Imaginatively Keep in mind what you have learnt from the Rubric about the concept of Discovery and attempt each one of the following tasks.
  11. 11. Remember… good writers don’t say that it is raining, they create the feeling of being rained upon for the reader… Therefore you must write around the concept – show, do not tell
  12. 12. Example: The sad echo of hollow drips beat rhythmically on her faded umbrella. Streaming slowly, sliding gently and falling tearfully onto the pale skin of her outstretched palm. Never is the word rainmentioned…but we still know that it is raining.
  13. 13. Image One You have discovered a lost Kitten in a drain. In four to five sentences “show” what you see, hear, feel and smell? You are not allowed to use the words Kitten or Cat, or any other synonym.
  14. 14. Image TwoYou have just discovered chocolate for the first time. You have never tasted this food before. In four to five sentence “show” the experience of eating this delicious treat for the first time. You must “show” its taste, smell and texture. You are not allowed to use the words sweet and chocolate.
  15. 15. Image Three You have discovered this never- before-seen photograph of your Grandfather. In four to five sentences “show” what you see and “show” your emotional response to this discovery? You are not allowed to use the words photograph, discover, or soldier.
  16. 16. Image Four You find the following box. What is hidden inside? In four to five sentences “show” the box and what you discover inside. You are not allowed to use the words old, small, big, large, wood, or wooden. You may only use the word box in conjunction with an adjective.
  17. 17. Image Five You remember the first time you were allowed beyond the back fence. In four to five sentences “show” how you feel and “show” what you discover? You are not allowed to use the words scared, excited, or happy. You may only use the words fence, and gate if you’re creating a metaphor / simile / personification / allusion / etc...
  18. 18. Image Six You find your old teddy bear from when you were a small child. In four to five sentences “show” your emotional response to this discovery – and “show” how the teddy bear feels and looks? You are not allowed to use the words sad, happy, old or fluffy. You may only use the words teddy/bear, if you’re creating a figurative language technique.

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