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Photos from the
Plains of Abraham
Photos from the
Plains of Abraham
The Mary MacKenzie Historic Slide Collection
333 historic photographs of North Elba
town...
Contents
About this collection...............................................................................................
About this collection
This is the third and final component of the intellectual legacy of Mary Landon
MacKenzie, who died ...
After scanning all 333 of Mary’s slides for electronic storage, I spent several months
digitally restoring the images. Mos...
Hotels
1
The story of the resort village of Lake Placid and the tale of its hotels are inextricably
intertwined. For instance, th...
2
Joe Nash was
later considered
to be the
“founder” of
Lake Placid,
subdividing his
farm property on
the west side of
Mirr...
3
A guest lolls on the lawn of the Red House before the development of Lake Placid village,
enjoying the serenity of Benne...
4
The Red House in its heyday.
5
In 1871, Benjamin Brewster, Joe Nash’s brother-in-law and next-door neighbor, built the first
real hotel in Lake Placid....
6
This ca. 1885 photo of Signal Hill shows Brewster’s and the Mirror Lake Inn.
7
Looking north on Mirror Lake, before the Lake Placid House’s “grandification.”
8
After Brewster’s major (some would say grotesque) expansion in 1897, it was no longer
known as the Lake Placid House. Th...
9
Looking up Mirror Lake toward the Lake Placid Inn, post-expansion.
10
Signal Hill and the expanded Lake Placid Inn, from across Mirror Lake.
11
12
This 1910 photo shows the Lake Placid Inn in its full glory.
Just 10 years later, though, Brewster’s burned to ground, ...
13
The Excelsior House, built in 1876 atop Signal Hill, was Ben Brewster’s
second hotel. Brewster sold it in 1878 to 30-ye...
14
The Stevens House was rebuilt, bigger and better than ever,
to become one of early Lake Placid’s signature hotels.
15
The parlor of the new Stevens House.
16
The Stevens House lobby.
17
The Stevens House stagecoach, 1890.
18
The Stevens House was decorated for the visit of President McKinley on Aug. 11, 1897.
19
The Stevens House at about the turn of the 20th
century, seen from the corner of
Main Street and Saranac Avenue. At str...
20
The Stevens House on Signal Hill, seen from across Mirror Lake, ca. 1900.
21
Around 1900.
22
This shot is similar to a photo in the Library of Congress collection that was taken in 1902.
23
The Stevens House and Signal Hill, seen from across Mirror Lake, 1920.
24
The Cascade House was a popular retreat built on
the isthmus between the twin Cascade Lakes in 1878.
25
The Cascade House, after significant additions were made in 1885.
26
27
Cascade House, ca. 1900.
28
The Cascade House boathouse.
29
30
On Cascade Lake.
31
At play at Cascade House.
32
The road past Cascade House. It was the upgrading of this road in 1927 that probably
doomed the hotel; stories say that...
33
The original core of the Grand View Hotel, built in 1878
on the current site of the Crowne Plaza Lake Placid Resort.
34
The Grand View. Next to it is the house known as Robin’s Nest.
35
This photo, taken from across Mirror Lake around 1890, shows a much-
expanded Grand View Hotel, with the Mirror Lake Ho...
36
The Grand View stagecoach, 1890.
37
The Grand View, as seen from Mirror Lake.
38
The view of Lake Placid village and Mirror Lake from the Grand View.
The Lake Placid House, before its 1897 expansion, ...
39
Grand View Hotel and Robin’s Nest, ca. 1895. In the foreground are
the ruins of the Mirror Lake House, which burned in ...
40
41
42
43
44
Adirondack Lodge, built by Henry van Hoevenberg in 1880.
The legendary log hotel was destroyed in the catastrophic fire...
45
Henry van Hoevenberg was, himself, one of the major attractions of his Adirondack
Lodge. In this photo, Henry tells tal...
46
After the 1903
fire, Henry van
Hoevenberg went
to work as chief
engineer for the
Lake Placid Club.
He is seen here,
as ...
47
48
Henry van Hoevenberg, right, with an unknown woman.
49
Henry van
Hoevenberg,
right, with an
unidentified man.
50
Henry van
Hoevenberg,
right, with Bert
Hinds, left.
51
Henry van
Hoevenberg, left,
with two
unidentified
persons, center,
and Godfrey
Dewey, front
right, seated.
52
Mirror Lake House (opened spring 1882) and Allen House (1880) stood side-by-side for a few
years on the lower slopes of...
53
This pre-1886 photo, taken from the north end of Mirror Lake, shows both the Mirror Lake
House and adjoining Allen Hous...
54
Mirror Lake House and Main Street, as seen from the northern end of Mirror Lake, 1890.
55
Mirror Lake House, front view, ca. 1893
56
Mirror Lake House, north side, ca. 1893.
57
The Mirror Lake House fire, fall 1894.
58
Another one of the area’s grand hotels was the Whiteface Inn,
built in 1882, originally known as the Westside for its l...
59
The front lawn of The Westside, leading down to Placid Lake, ca. 1890.
60
The Westside, renamed the Whiteface Inn in February 1891, photographed in 1895. The first
Whiteface Inn was torn down i...
61
The second Whiteface Inn, built in 1901.
62
Whiteface Inn No. 2, built in 1901, burned in 1909.
63
The Ruisseaumont Hotel, looking out over Placid Lake, dominated
the scene from its construction in 1891 until it burned...
64
The Ruisseaumont, 1893
65
The Ruisseaumont, 1900
66
Lake Placid’s hotel history was everywhere. This house (current address 2512 Main Street) was
built in 1880 as the home...
67
In the foreground is the old Leahy House, which later became the site of a Ramada Inn,
expanded and renamed the Summit ...
68
This photo shows
the first Ray Brook
Inn, which burned in
1907.
69
The
second
Ray
Brook Inn,
torn down
in the
early
1950s.
70
A hand-tinted postcard shows The Pines, on Saranac Avenue, built in 1900.
It was greatly expanded in 1926 and renamed t...
71
The Pines, ca. 1900. Interestingly, this post card appears to have been made from the same
photograph as the previous i...
72
This photo from a
promotional
brochure shows
the Mountain
View House on
the Cascade Road
around the turn of
the 20th
ce...
73
In June 1903, a chimney fire burned the Mountain View House to the ground.
74
The Lakeside Inn, on Mirror Lake, ca. 1900. This small hotel was built by Carrie Lamb
Ware, who was given the land by h...
75
The Lakeside Inn
76
The Lakeside
77
The Homestead, which became one of Lake Placid’s better known small hotels, started out in
the 1880s as a private home ...
78
79
In 1922, Charlie Green, son-in-law of village founder/developer Joe Nash,
sold The Homestead to the Roland family. Pete...
80
Charlie Green also operated the Green House, later called The Adirondack.
It stood just to the south of the Adirondack ...
81
The American House (or Lodge) was built in 1894 by the Hurley Brothers.
It stood on Mill Pond directly across Station S...
82
A colorized postcard shows the Belmont, which stood on Saranac Avenue.
83
William Fox Leggett’s storied log hotel, the Castle Rustico, on the west side of upper Placid
Lake. The hostelry was bu...
84
A photo of Lyon’s Stagecoach Inn in 1930. Once thought to have been an expansion of the
original Osgood’s Inn, built in...
85
The Albert and Ella (Brewster) Billings residence, built in the 1890s, later
became the Mirror Lake Inn’s Colonial Hous...
86
The National Hotel, built in 1909 by Henry Allen, stood on the east side
of Station Street just north of the railroad d...
87
The Northwoods Inn, opened in 1897 by Wes Kennedy. It is not known whether the hotel
was built in that year on the form...
88
The Forest View House, ca. 1910, built ca. 1895, run by W.H. Bennett.
Located at the foot of Cobble Hill, overlooking t...
89
The Forest View.
90
The house known today as High Knoll, built ca. 1899, was once the
Placid Shore Inn. It stands on the crest of Victor He...
Winter sport
93
Almost from its inception, the Lake Placid Club, on Mirror Lake, played a central role in the
creation and development ...
94
The very concept of winter sport in North America was created by members of the Lake
Placid Club. In the winter of 1904...
95
Those 10 hardy pioneers were author Irving Bacheller, his wife Anna Schultz Bacheller,
Mrs. Ackerman, Dr. and Mrs. Edga...
96
The next winter, more visitors came than the Club could provide for. After just
two winters, a new, year-round clubhous...
97
As early as January 27, 1906, Lake Placid was being actively marketed as a
winter playground resort, as evidenced in th...
98
The concept of winter sport was quickly picked up in the new village of
Lake Placid, where this toboggan run off Signal...
99
100
101
Ice trotting on Mirror Lake was a very popular sport in Lake Placid, actually predating the
LPC outings by more than a...
102
At around the same time, ice sailing races were also held on Mirror Lake,
as seen in the photos on this and the follow...
103
104
And then, there was Winter Carnival …
105
The municipal skating rink on Mirror Lake was the center of activity for the
community festival, which ran each Februa...
106
Revelers going down to Mirror Lake in the winter of 1918-19.
107
The entire village participated in the festivities. In this photo, the William Lamb house on
Signal Hill is decked out...
108
109
110
111
Saranac Lake’s Lamy brothers — Edmund, Ernest and Claude — were staples
on the Mirror Lake winter sport scene around 1...
112
113
The Lamy brothers perfected an act on Mirror Lake that they took on the
road in the Roaring Twenties. Above, Ernest La...
114
Ski joring, 1920s.
115
Dog sledding was very popular in Lake Placid through the 1930s – so much
so that it became a demonstration sport in th...
116
Explorer and animal trainer Jacques Suzanne with a team on Placid Lake in the late 1920s
117
The Lake Placid Club ran this toboggan slide in the 1920s.
118
119
Main Street toboggan chute, ca. 1930
120
In the early 1920s, this was the Lake Placid “ski lift.”
121
Skiing in Lake Placid got a boost from the legendary H. Smith
“Jackrabbit” Johannsen, seen here with a ski class in th...
122
123
124
Founders of the LPC’s Sno Birds on the Lake Placid Club ice rink, 1921. The
Sno Birds became a major force in organize...
125
Godfrey Dewey’s Sno Birds bob team, in a Lake Placid Club sled
126
An unidentified bob team
127
Early LPC ski
jump, 1920
128
Early LPC ski jump, 1921
129
A race under way on the Mirror Lake speed skating oval, 1925
130
131
Spectators pack the stands on Mirror Lake for the races, ca. 1920
132
The judges’ stand
133
Olympic speed
skater Jack Shea
and Lucille
Hickey were
named king and
queen of winter at
the Coronation
Ice Festival i...
134
Big band leader Ozzie Nelson and lead singer Harriet Hillard, later of “Ozzie
and Harriet” TV fame, were Lake Placid’s...
135
Painted ice decorated the Olympic Arena for the 1935 Coronation Ice Show.
136
The Coronation
Ice Shows were
by no means the
only grand
spectacles staged
in the Olympic
Arena. In this
photo, dancer...
137
Plenty of celebrities have come to enjoy Lake Placid’s winter sport
offerings, including Rudy Vallee, seen here in the...
138
Commander
Richard Byrd
139
Buster Crabbe
(“Tarzan”) and
Kitty Kallen
ready for snow
joring; the two
were king and
queen of winter in
1951, when t...
140
New York Governor Averil
Harriman. With Art Draper,
former Marble Mountain ski
center chief, Harriman pushed
through a...
141
Bob Birk, left, later the athletic director for Lake Placid Central School, with Ron
MacKenzie, the leader of Lake Pla...
142
The 1980 Olympic ski jumps
143
A modern ski jumper flies off the new jumps
144
An unidentified
bobsled team in
modern sled,
emblazoned
“USAF,” shoots
down the 1980
bob run.
145
Unidentified
luger rides the
1980 Olympic
track.
1932 Olympic Winter Games
149
In 1884, the area that was to become the famous Olympic Village of Lake Placid was first being
developed from the Adir...
150
The tremendous
success of Lake
Placid speed
skater Charlie
Jewtraw,
photographed
here in the early
1920s, was one of
t...
151
Charlie Jewtraw
152
The very first event in the very first Olympic Winter Games (held in Chamonix, France, from
January 25 to February 5, ...
153
Charlie Jewtraw,
right, winner of
the first gold
medal ever
awarded at the
Olympic Winter
Games, shakes
hands with the...
154
Godfrey Dewey, son
of Lake Placid Club
founder Melvil
Dewey and one of
the 10 Club
members who
pioneered winter
sport ...
155
In 1931, the town of North Elba began excavating this
site on Main Street for the 1932 Olympic Fieldhouse.
156
157
158
The Zig Zag curve on the bobsled run, shown here under construction.
Work was begun on Aug. 4, 1930; it was completed ...
159
Here is the Zig Zag curve on the 1932 bobsled run,
after completion and dressing for competition.
160
On the flooded tennis courts behind the Lake Placid Club, college hockey
tournaments were held before the start of the...
161
162
Franklin D. Roosevelt, then governor of New York, filled in at the
February 4, 1932 opening ceremonies for President H...
163
The review stand, set up above the “Olympic Stadium” (where the speed skating
oval is now located) on the slope below ...
164
The athletes’ parade, during the opening ceremonies.
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
American dignitaries on the review stand doff their caps
as Old Glory is carried past them by the U.S. team.
174
175
The Olympic Arena during a hiatus in the opening ceremonies.
176
With 1928 bobsled champ Billy Fiske holding the American flag, U.S. Olympian Jack Shea
of Lake Placid takes the Athlet...
177
Godfrey Dewey introduces Governor Roosevelt during the opening ceremonies.
178
At a Lake Placid Club banquet, left to right: Godfrey Dewey, Lady
Fearnley of Oslo, FDR, and Eleanor Roosevelt. (Photo...
179
180
Let the games
begin! A ski
jumper flies off
the Olympic jump
at Intervales.
181
Grooming the jump.
182
Officials gather at
the base of the
jump where
Japanese jumper
Yoichi Takata
lies, knocked
unconscious and
suffering a...
183
The parking lot for the Intervales ski jump during the 1932 Olympics.
184
The U.S. ski team.
185
The Japanese ski team.
186
Another shot of the Japanese Olympians.
187
The Norwegian Olympic Nordic ski team.
188
The Rudd
brothers, from
Norway.
189
Sven Utterstrom, Sweden, winner of the gold medal in Nordic skiing.
190
Crowds gathered on the Zig Zag curve.
191
Unidentified two-man bob team
192
Hubert and Curtis Stevens, Placid men who won the gold medal in two-man bobsled
193
Billy Fiske’s four-man U.S. bob team. Fiske, just 20 years old, had already
won Olympic gold on a five-man sled four y...
194
Billy Fiske and teammates Edward Eagan, Clifford Gray, Jay O’Brien.
195
Billy Fiske’s team shoots down the track at Mount Van Hoevenberg.
196
Gold medalists Billy Fiske and team at the four-man bob award ceremony.
197
Werner Zahn (in overcoat), captain of the 1931 world-champion
German bobsled team, presenting the Martineau Challenge ...
198
This was an extraordinary gesture of good sportsmanship. Zahn
had lost two experimental sleds in his warm-up heats on ...
199
200
A final shot of Billy Fiske and team.
201
U.S. Olympic bobsled team No. 2 won the silver medal. Calling themselves the Red Devils of
Saranac Lake, they were Ed ...
202
USA speed skater Jack Shea in the lead
203
Jack Shea being awarded one of his two gold
medals. Godfrey Dewey looks on from the far left.
204
Jack Shea poses
for his trading
card.
205
The second heat of the 10,000-meter speed skating race. Though two Norwegians are in the lead
here, it was American Ir...
206
Distance speed
skater Irving
Jaffee, of New
York City, took
gold in both the
5,000-meter and
10,000-meter
races.
207
Double-gold medalist Irving Jaffee, left, poses with three
other members of the 1932 U.S. Olympic speed skating team.
208
Andree and Pierre Brunet, of France, gold medalists in the
pairs figure skating competition. (Photo Roger I. Moore)
209
16-year-old figure
skating legend
Sonja Henie in
the Lake Placid
Olympic
Fieldhouse.
(Photo Roger I.
Moore)
210
Figure skaters
Sonja Henie, Karl
Schafer, Hedy
Stenof
211
Phil Taylor, of
England,
conducts a stunt-
skating exhibition
during the 1932
Olympics.
212
Canada’s undefeated Olympic hockey team; sweater
letters indicate the players are from Winnipeg.
213
Dejected Polish goalie Josef Stogowski waits for yet another
puck to go into his net as Canada shuts out Poland 10-to-...
214
Group photo of the New York State Police contingent
assigned to the 1932 Olympic Winter Games in Lake Placid.
215
A group photo of the Lake Placid Olympic Committee staff.
216
Closeup: At
center is Mary C.
Landon (later
Mary
MacKenzie), who
compiled the
slides contained
in this historic
collec...
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)
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This is the largest, most comprehensive collection in existence of images depicting the history of Lake Placid, consisting of the 333 historic slides compiled by the late public historian Mary MacKenzie, digitally restored by Lee Manchester. TO PURCHASE A BOUND, PRINT EDITION, GO TO http://stores.lulu.com/marymackenzie

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Photos from the Plains of Abraham (Part 1 of 2)

  1. 1. Photos from the Plains of Abraham
  2. 2. Photos from the Plains of Abraham The Mary MacKenzie Historic Slide Collection 333 historic photographs of North Elba township and the village of Lake Placid, Essex County, New York Curated by Lee Manchester The Mary MacKenzie Project Lake Placid Public Library January 2010
  3. 3. Contents About this collection................................................................................................................... ix Hotels........................................................................................................................................xiii Winter sport............................................................................................................................... 91 1932 Olympic Winter Games.................................................................................................. 147 The village............................................................................................................................... 217 Newman................................................................................................................................... 247 Placid Lake .............................................................................................................................. 261 The Doris................................................................................................................................. 269 Early churches ......................................................................................................................... 277 Schools..................................................................................................................................... 297 Roads ....................................................................................................................................... 303 John Brown.............................................................................................................................. 309 Moving pictures....................................................................................................................... 321 Farming.................................................................................................................................... 327 Lake Placid Club ..................................................................................................................... 335 Placid at war ............................................................................................................................ 347 Miscellaneous personages ....................................................................................................... 355 Miscellaneous.......................................................................................................................... 363
  4. 4. About this collection This is the third and final component of the intellectual legacy of Mary Landon MacKenzie, who died in 2003. For more than 40 years, Mary MacKenzie was the official historian of the town of North Elba, within which is situated the village of Lake Placid. Shortly after her death, I began combing through the papers she had left behind, preparing to edit her collected historical writings. Mary’s first posthumous book was not, however, a historical publication; it was a collection of nearly 150 poems she had written as a young woman in the 1930s and quietly preserved in her desk, unbeknownst to her family. That collection was first published in 2005 by Blueline, the literary magazine of the Adirondacks, as its first-ever book-length supplement. It has been reprinted as “The Secret Poems of Mary C. Landon.” In 2007, Nicholas K. Burns Publishing of Utica, N.Y., came out with the crown jewel of Mary MacKenzie’s legacy, “The Plains of Abraham: A History of North Elba and Lake Placid,” a 400-page collection of the research left behind from her four-decade career as an Adirondack public historian. I have recently released a supplement to that major collection, “More from the Plains of Abraham,” which contains a number of publishable items from Mary’s files that were left out of the original anthology. The final component of Mrs. MacKenzie’s intellectual estate is the Mary MacKenzie Historic Slide Collection, which contains the restored images from 333 film slides collected by Mary and used as illustrative material for her public lectures on local and regional history. It is, to my knowledge, the largest, most comprehensive collection in existence of images depicting the history of Lake Placid and environs.
  5. 5. After scanning all 333 of Mary’s slides for electronic storage, I spent several months digitally restoring the images. Most of them had sustained at least some damage from rough treatment over the years, and some were in very poor condition. The image collection was initially published online by the Lake Placid Public Library in conjunction with the release of “The Plains of Abraham” in 2007. I have recently reformatted the material for print publication. Several images in this volume appear “cockeyed.” They were either originally photographed, or were transferred to film slides, at a slightly “off” angle. In the process of restoring these images, I straightened them up, but I did not want to trim away the visual information that would be lost if I were to square these photographs off, which is why you see them here as they are. I have written captions for the photos in this collection that should be sufficient to identify them for those familiar with Lake Placid and North Elba history from reading “The Plains of Abraham.” Any questions about the images in this collection should be answered by referring to Mary MacKenzie’s magnum opus. A very few captions in this book identify the image’s photographer. Those were cases where Mrs. MacKenzie had actually recorded that identification on the cardboard frame of the slide itself. I did not take any extra steps to systematically identify the many photographers whose work Mary had appropriated as she interpreted the history of North Elba and Lake Placid for the members of her community and those who love it. Lee ManchesterJay, New York November 23, 2008
  6. 6. Hotels
  7. 7. 1 The story of the resort village of Lake Placid and the tale of its hotels are inextricably intertwined. For instance, the very first house (1852) built within the territory that would one day become Lake Placid village was also its first hostelry. This 1873 photo shows the famous Red House, home of Joseph V. Nash, who also boarded guests who were visiting the lake.
  8. 8. 2 Joe Nash was later considered to be the “founder” of Lake Placid, subdividing his farm property on the west side of Mirror Lake and encouraging the development of a new village there.
  9. 9. 3 A guest lolls on the lawn of the Red House before the development of Lake Placid village, enjoying the serenity of Bennet’s Pond, as Mirror Lake was previously known. (Photo by S.R. Stoddard, 1873)
  10. 10. 4 The Red House in its heyday.
  11. 11. 5 In 1871, Benjamin Brewster, Joe Nash’s brother-in-law and next-door neighbor, built the first real hotel in Lake Placid. He called it Lake Placid House, but most folks just called it Brewster’s. This stereopticon photo of Brewster’s was taken in 1873 by Seneca Ray Stoddard.
  12. 12. 6 This ca. 1885 photo of Signal Hill shows Brewster’s and the Mirror Lake Inn.
  13. 13. 7 Looking north on Mirror Lake, before the Lake Placid House’s “grandification.”
  14. 14. 8 After Brewster’s major (some would say grotesque) expansion in 1897, it was no longer known as the Lake Placid House. This July 12, 1901 photo shows the hotel that had come to be called the Lake Placid Inn. On the far right is St. Eustace-by-Lakes Episcopal Church.
  15. 15. 9 Looking up Mirror Lake toward the Lake Placid Inn, post-expansion.
  16. 16. 10 Signal Hill and the expanded Lake Placid Inn, from across Mirror Lake.
  17. 17. 11
  18. 18. 12 This 1910 photo shows the Lake Placid Inn in its full glory. Just 10 years later, though, Brewster’s burned to ground, never to be rebuilt.
  19. 19. 13 The Excelsior House, built in 1876 atop Signal Hill, was Ben Brewster’s second hotel. Brewster sold it in 1878 to 30-year-old John Stevens, from Plattsburgh, who renamed it the Stevens House. This photo was taken about 1880, five years before the fire of Dec. 24, 1885 that destroyed the building.
  20. 20. 14 The Stevens House was rebuilt, bigger and better than ever, to become one of early Lake Placid’s signature hotels.
  21. 21. 15 The parlor of the new Stevens House.
  22. 22. 16 The Stevens House lobby.
  23. 23. 17 The Stevens House stagecoach, 1890.
  24. 24. 18 The Stevens House was decorated for the visit of President McKinley on Aug. 11, 1897.
  25. 25. 19 The Stevens House at about the turn of the 20th century, seen from the corner of Main Street and Saranac Avenue. At streetside is the home of William Lamb.
  26. 26. 20 The Stevens House on Signal Hill, seen from across Mirror Lake, ca. 1900.
  27. 27. 21 Around 1900.
  28. 28. 22 This shot is similar to a photo in the Library of Congress collection that was taken in 1902.
  29. 29. 23 The Stevens House and Signal Hill, seen from across Mirror Lake, 1920.
  30. 30. 24 The Cascade House was a popular retreat built on the isthmus between the twin Cascade Lakes in 1878.
  31. 31. 25 The Cascade House, after significant additions were made in 1885.
  32. 32. 26
  33. 33. 27 Cascade House, ca. 1900.
  34. 34. 28 The Cascade House boathouse.
  35. 35. 29
  36. 36. 30 On Cascade Lake.
  37. 37. 31 At play at Cascade House.
  38. 38. 32 The road past Cascade House. It was the upgrading of this road in 1927 that probably doomed the hotel; stories say that road blasting blew so many holes in the roof that the Lake Placid Club, which had bought the place four years earlier, never reopened it.
  39. 39. 33 The original core of the Grand View Hotel, built in 1878 on the current site of the Crowne Plaza Lake Placid Resort.
  40. 40. 34 The Grand View. Next to it is the house known as Robin’s Nest.
  41. 41. 35 This photo, taken from across Mirror Lake around 1890, shows a much- expanded Grand View Hotel, with the Mirror Lake House below it.
  42. 42. 36 The Grand View stagecoach, 1890.
  43. 43. 37 The Grand View, as seen from Mirror Lake.
  44. 44. 38 The view of Lake Placid village and Mirror Lake from the Grand View. The Lake Placid House, before its 1897 expansion, can be seen across the lake.
  45. 45. 39 Grand View Hotel and Robin’s Nest, ca. 1895. In the foreground are the ruins of the Mirror Lake House, which burned in the fall of 1894.
  46. 46. 40
  47. 47. 41
  48. 48. 42
  49. 49. 43
  50. 50. 44 Adirondack Lodge, built by Henry van Hoevenberg in 1880. The legendary log hotel was destroyed in the catastrophic firestorm of 1903.
  51. 51. 45 Henry van Hoevenberg was, himself, one of the major attractions of his Adirondack Lodge. In this photo, Henry tells tall tales to his guests around the campfire.
  52. 52. 46 After the 1903 fire, Henry van Hoevenberg went to work as chief engineer for the Lake Placid Club. He is seen here, as in most photos, in his customary all-leather attire.
  53. 53. 47
  54. 54. 48 Henry van Hoevenberg, right, with an unknown woman.
  55. 55. 49 Henry van Hoevenberg, right, with an unidentified man.
  56. 56. 50 Henry van Hoevenberg, right, with Bert Hinds, left.
  57. 57. 51 Henry van Hoevenberg, left, with two unidentified persons, center, and Godfrey Dewey, front right, seated.
  58. 58. 52 Mirror Lake House (opened spring 1882) and Allen House (1880) stood side-by-side for a few years on the lower slopes of Grand View Hill. In this 1883 photo, Mirror Lake House is on the left, Allen House on the right. Just three years later, the Allen House burned. Its owner, Henry Allen, consolidated his operations in the Grand View Hotel, which he had bought in 1881.
  59. 59. 53 This pre-1886 photo, taken from the north end of Mirror Lake, shows both the Mirror Lake House and adjoining Allen House below the early Grand View.
  60. 60. 54 Mirror Lake House and Main Street, as seen from the northern end of Mirror Lake, 1890.
  61. 61. 55 Mirror Lake House, front view, ca. 1893
  62. 62. 56 Mirror Lake House, north side, ca. 1893.
  63. 63. 57 The Mirror Lake House fire, fall 1894.
  64. 64. 58 Another one of the area’s grand hotels was the Whiteface Inn, built in 1882, originally known as the Westside for its location on the West Lake of Placid Lake. This drawing dates from 1887.
  65. 65. 59 The front lawn of The Westside, leading down to Placid Lake, ca. 1890.
  66. 66. 60 The Westside, renamed the Whiteface Inn in February 1891, photographed in 1895. The first Whiteface Inn was torn down in 1901 so that a second Whiteface could be built in its place.
  67. 67. 61 The second Whiteface Inn, built in 1901.
  68. 68. 62 Whiteface Inn No. 2, built in 1901, burned in 1909.
  69. 69. 63 The Ruisseaumont Hotel, looking out over Placid Lake, dominated the scene from its construction in 1891 until it burned on July 2, 1909.
  70. 70. 64 The Ruisseaumont, 1893
  71. 71. 65 The Ruisseaumont, 1900
  72. 72. 66 Lake Placid’s hotel history was everywhere. This house (current address 2512 Main Street) was built in 1880 as the home of Marshall Lamoy. It was sold in 1900 to Episcopal rector Rev. William Wilmerding Moir, who died just two years later. The house was then bought in 1906 by Charles Kennedy, owner of the neighboring Northwoods Inn, who used it for overflow. Kennedy sold the house in 1919 to Harvey Alford. Alford enlarged the house on the south end in 1925, and it became the Alford Inn. Today, it is the Adirondack Decorative Arts and Crafts store.
  73. 73. 67 In the foreground is the old Leahy House, which later became the site of a Ramada Inn, expanded and renamed the Summit Hotel Resort & Suites in 2005. Its owner, Thomas Leahy, operated the nearby Lakeside Inn from 1920 until his death in 1947.
  74. 74. 68 This photo shows the first Ray Brook Inn, which burned in 1907.
  75. 75. 69 The second Ray Brook Inn, torn down in the early 1950s.
  76. 76. 70 A hand-tinted postcard shows The Pines, on Saranac Avenue, built in 1900. It was greatly expanded in 1926 and renamed the St. Moritz. Then, in 2004, new owners gave it back its original name, The Pines.
  77. 77. 71 The Pines, ca. 1900. Interestingly, this post card appears to have been made from the same photograph as the previous image, but it has been reversed and cropped more generously.
  78. 78. 72 This photo from a promotional brochure shows the Mountain View House on the Cascade Road around the turn of the 20th century. Originally the 1850 frame home of Robert G. Scott, the farmer started taking in boarders. By 1877 it had been expanded into its final form.
  79. 79. 73 In June 1903, a chimney fire burned the Mountain View House to the ground.
  80. 80. 74 The Lakeside Inn, on Mirror Lake, ca. 1900. This small hotel was built by Carrie Lamb Ware, who was given the land by her father Joseph Nash. Carrie ran the hotel for many years. It later burned and was replaced by the current lakeside annex of the Hilton hotel.
  81. 81. 75 The Lakeside Inn
  82. 82. 76 The Lakeside
  83. 83. 77 The Homestead, which became one of Lake Placid’s better known small hotels, started out in the 1880s as a private home on the southwest corner of Main Street and Saranac Avenue.
  84. 84. 78
  85. 85. 79 In 1922, Charlie Green, son-in-law of village founder/developer Joe Nash, sold The Homestead to the Roland family. Peter Roland tore down The Homestead in 1979, in the runup to the Olympics, to build the Hilton Hotel.
  86. 86. 80 Charlie Green also operated the Green House, later called The Adirondack. It stood just to the south of the Adirondack Baptist Church on Main Street.
  87. 87. 81 The American House (or Lodge) was built in 1894 by the Hurley Brothers. It stood on Mill Pond directly across Station Street from the railroad depot. On July 21, 1941, the 30-room hotel was destroyed by fire. A hardware store now stands on the site, but the American House stables still stand behind it.
  88. 88. 82 A colorized postcard shows the Belmont, which stood on Saranac Avenue.
  89. 89. 83 William Fox Leggett’s storied log hotel, the Castle Rustico, on the west side of upper Placid Lake. The hostelry was built as a private home in 1873-74 and opened for business in 1879. The Leggetts ceased operating their business in 1888. The property was subdivided into smaller camps. The “castle” itself fell into disrepair and was demolished in the 1950s.
  90. 90. 84 A photo of Lyon’s Stagecoach Inn in 1930. Once thought to have been an expansion of the original Osgood’s Inn, built in the 1830s, it was later demonstrated to have been entirely separate and of later construction, possibly around 1850. Though the Stagecoach Inn still stands on Old Military Road, a fire severely damaged the structure’s interior in 2002.
  91. 91. 85 The Albert and Ella (Brewster) Billings residence, built in the 1890s, later became the Mirror Lake Inn’s Colonial House; it was demolished in 2006. Albert and Ella’s first home, on Mirror Lake’s east shore, later became Bonnieblink, the core of Melvil Dewey’s Lake Placid Club complex. Billings started a Placid Lake marina that, after his death in 1903, became the famous George & Bliss marina.
  92. 92. 86 The National Hotel, built in 1909 by Henry Allen, stood on the east side of Station Street just north of the railroad depot. It was torn down in 1959.
  93. 93. 87 The Northwoods Inn, opened in 1897 by Wes Kennedy. It is not known whether the hotel was built in that year on the former site of Kennedy’s house, which was built in 1880, or if the hotel was itself an expansion of the Kennedy home. The Northwoods became an annex to the Hotel Marcy when the latter opened in 1927. The Northwoods burned on Dec. 28, 1966. Another building took its place, and the Hotel Marcy took its name.
  94. 94. 88 The Forest View House, ca. 1910, built ca. 1895, run by W.H. Bennett. Located at the foot of Cobble Hill, overlooking the main Lake Placid Club campus on Mirror Lake, it was bought by the LPC in 1925. It burned in 1944.
  95. 95. 89 The Forest View.
  96. 96. 90 The house known today as High Knoll, built ca. 1899, was once the Placid Shore Inn. It stands on the crest of Victor Herbert Drive.
  97. 97. Winter sport
  98. 98. 93 Almost from its inception, the Lake Placid Club, on Mirror Lake, played a central role in the creation and development of winter sport in Lake Placid.
  99. 99. 94 The very concept of winter sport in North America was created by members of the Lake Placid Club. In the winter of 1904-05, ten men and women stayed over at the summer resort. They skied, skated, tobogganed, snowshoed, and otherwise gamboled in the snow, the women’s petticoats sweeping the drifts. The experiment was a smashing success!
  100. 100. 95 Those 10 hardy pioneers were author Irving Bacheller, his wife Anna Schultz Bacheller, Mrs. Ackerman, Dr. and Mrs. Edgar VanderVerr of Albany, the latter’s sister Miss Wooster, Mrs. Ella B. Dana and her son Ted (Edward C.) of Metuchen, New Jersey, Godfrey Dewey, son of LPC founder Melvil Dewey, and Henry Van Hoevenberg (at the far right above). It’s certain that some of those 10 are included in the photo above, but not how many or whom.
  101. 101. 96 The next winter, more visitors came than the Club could provide for. After just two winters, a new, year-round clubhouse had to be built. By 1908, outdoor teas, camp dinners, climbing, and even all-night camping parties were on the winter agenda. The photo above was taken during a Club outing in the early 1920s.
  102. 102. 97 As early as January 27, 1906, Lake Placid was being actively marketed as a winter playground resort, as evidenced in this famous publicity photo.
  103. 103. 98 The concept of winter sport was quickly picked up in the new village of Lake Placid, where this toboggan run off Signal Hill onto Mirror Lake was in operation by 1910, when this and the next two photos were taken.
  104. 104. 99
  105. 105. 100
  106. 106. 101 Ice trotting on Mirror Lake was a very popular sport in Lake Placid, actually predating the LPC outings by more than a decade, though it went out of vogue for a time. This photo, from 1911, marks the brief revival of the sport under the auspices of hotelier John Stevens. With the onset of U.S. involvement in World War I, ice trotting disappeared here, never to return.
  107. 107. 102 At around the same time, ice sailing races were also held on Mirror Lake, as seen in the photos on this and the following page, both from 1915.
  108. 108. 103
  109. 109. 104 And then, there was Winter Carnival …
  110. 110. 105 The municipal skating rink on Mirror Lake was the center of activity for the community festival, which ran each February in the early years of the 20th century.
  111. 111. 106 Revelers going down to Mirror Lake in the winter of 1918-19.
  112. 112. 107 The entire village participated in the festivities. In this photo, the William Lamb house on Signal Hill is decked out for the first Lake Placid Winter Carnival in February 1914
  113. 113. 108
  114. 114. 109
  115. 115. 110
  116. 116. 111 Saranac Lake’s Lamy brothers — Edmund, Ernest and Claude — were staples on the Mirror Lake winter sport scene around 1920 with their famous barrel- jumping act. Jumping the barrels above is Claude Lamy, better known as “Bucky.”
  117. 117. 112
  118. 118. 113 The Lamy brothers perfected an act on Mirror Lake that they took on the road in the Roaring Twenties. Above, Ernest Lamy, playing the clown, “jumps” the barrels while brothers Bucky (center) and Ed (far right) look on.
  119. 119. 114 Ski joring, 1920s.
  120. 120. 115 Dog sledding was very popular in Lake Placid through the 1930s – so much so that it became a demonstration sport in the 1932 Olympic Winter Games.
  121. 121. 116 Explorer and animal trainer Jacques Suzanne with a team on Placid Lake in the late 1920s
  122. 122. 117 The Lake Placid Club ran this toboggan slide in the 1920s.
  123. 123. 118
  124. 124. 119 Main Street toboggan chute, ca. 1930
  125. 125. 120 In the early 1920s, this was the Lake Placid “ski lift.”
  126. 126. 121 Skiing in Lake Placid got a boost from the legendary H. Smith “Jackrabbit” Johannsen, seen here with a ski class in the early 1920s.
  127. 127. 122
  128. 128. 123
  129. 129. 124 Founders of the LPC’s Sno Birds on the Lake Placid Club ice rink, 1921. The Sno Birds became a major force in organized winter sport competition in the 1920s, contributing directly to Lake Placid’s first successful Olympic bid.
  130. 130. 125 Godfrey Dewey’s Sno Birds bob team, in a Lake Placid Club sled
  131. 131. 126 An unidentified bob team
  132. 132. 127 Early LPC ski jump, 1920
  133. 133. 128 Early LPC ski jump, 1921
  134. 134. 129 A race under way on the Mirror Lake speed skating oval, 1925
  135. 135. 130
  136. 136. 131 Spectators pack the stands on Mirror Lake for the races, ca. 1920
  137. 137. 132 The judges’ stand
  138. 138. 133 Olympic speed skater Jack Shea and Lucille Hickey were named king and queen of winter at the Coronation Ice Festival in January 1932, just one month before Shea took the gold in two Olympic speed skating events.
  139. 139. 134 Big band leader Ozzie Nelson and lead singer Harriet Hillard, later of “Ozzie and Harriet” TV fame, were Lake Placid’s king and queen of winter in 1935.
  140. 140. 135 Painted ice decorated the Olympic Arena for the 1935 Coronation Ice Show.
  141. 141. 136 The Coronation Ice Shows were by no means the only grand spectacles staged in the Olympic Arena. In this photo, dancers perform in a summer ice operetta featuring a cast of 133 that was staged in August 1935.
  142. 142. 137 Plenty of celebrities have come to enjoy Lake Placid’s winter sport offerings, including Rudy Vallee, seen here in the late 1930s.
  143. 143. 138 Commander Richard Byrd
  144. 144. 139 Buster Crabbe (“Tarzan”) and Kitty Kallen ready for snow joring; the two were king and queen of winter in 1951, when this photo was shot.
  145. 145. 140 New York Governor Averil Harriman. With Art Draper, former Marble Mountain ski center chief, Harriman pushed through a state constitutional amendment that allowed the development of a ski center within the “forever wild” Forest Preserve on Whiteface Mountain.
  146. 146. 141 Bob Birk, left, later the athletic director for Lake Placid Central School, with Ron MacKenzie, the leader of Lake Placid’s longstanding drive to win a bid for a second Olympic Winter Games. MacKenzie, “the Patriarch of Winter Sports” died in 1978 while preparations were under way for the XIII Winter Olympiad.
  147. 147. 142 The 1980 Olympic ski jumps
  148. 148. 143 A modern ski jumper flies off the new jumps
  149. 149. 144 An unidentified bobsled team in modern sled, emblazoned “USAF,” shoots down the 1980 bob run.
  150. 150. 145 Unidentified luger rides the 1980 Olympic track.
  151. 151. 1932 Olympic Winter Games
  152. 152. 149 In 1884, the area that was to become the famous Olympic Village of Lake Placid was first being developed from the Adirondack fields and forestland. This photo shows the location that, nearly half a century later, would be excavated for the 1932 Olympic Arena and Fieldhouse.
  153. 153. 150 The tremendous success of Lake Placid speed skater Charlie Jewtraw, photographed here in the early 1920s, was one of the elements that contributed to the village’s success in its bid for the 1932 Olympic Winter Games.
  154. 154. 151 Charlie Jewtraw
  155. 155. 152 The very first event in the very first Olympic Winter Games (held in Chamonix, France, from January 25 to February 5, 1924) was this 500-meter speed-skating race. Charlie Jewtraw won.
  156. 156. 153 Charlie Jewtraw, right, winner of the first gold medal ever awarded at the Olympic Winter Games, shakes hands with the Canadian speed skater who took the silver.
  157. 157. 154 Godfrey Dewey, son of Lake Placid Club founder Melvil Dewey and one of the 10 Club members who pioneered winter sport at the LPC in 1904-05, accompanied the U.S. ski team to the second Winter Olympiad in 1928. The next year, Dewey sailed alone for Europe, posing here on the deck of the Ile de France before it set sail. Dewey met with the International Olympic Committee in Lausanne and successfully bid for the 1932 Olympic Winter Games.
  158. 158. 155 In 1931, the town of North Elba began excavating this site on Main Street for the 1932 Olympic Fieldhouse.
  159. 159. 156
  160. 160. 157
  161. 161. 158 The Zig Zag curve on the bobsled run, shown here under construction. Work was begun on Aug. 4, 1930; it was completed in just 148 days.
  162. 162. 159 Here is the Zig Zag curve on the 1932 bobsled run, after completion and dressing for competition.
  163. 163. 160 On the flooded tennis courts behind the Lake Placid Club, college hockey tournaments were held before the start of the Olympic Winter Games.
  164. 164. 161
  165. 165. 162 Franklin D. Roosevelt, then governor of New York, filled in at the February 4, 1932 opening ceremonies for President Herbert Hoover.
  166. 166. 163 The review stand, set up above the “Olympic Stadium” (where the speed skating oval is now located) on the slope below the Lake Placid High School. At left, in a ball cap and glasses, is Godfrey Dewey; at center, FDR; between them, Count de Baillet-Latour, president of the International Olympic Committee.
  167. 167. 164 The athletes’ parade, during the opening ceremonies.
  168. 168. 165
  169. 169. 166
  170. 170. 167
  171. 171. 168
  172. 172. 169
  173. 173. 170
  174. 174. 171
  175. 175. 172
  176. 176. 173 American dignitaries on the review stand doff their caps as Old Glory is carried past them by the U.S. team.
  177. 177. 174
  178. 178. 175 The Olympic Arena during a hiatus in the opening ceremonies.
  179. 179. 176 With 1928 bobsled champ Billy Fiske holding the American flag, U.S. Olympian Jack Shea of Lake Placid takes the Athletes’ Oath on behalf of all competitors in the 1932 games.
  180. 180. 177 Godfrey Dewey introduces Governor Roosevelt during the opening ceremonies.
  181. 181. 178 At a Lake Placid Club banquet, left to right: Godfrey Dewey, Lady Fearnley of Oslo, FDR, and Eleanor Roosevelt. (Photo Irving L. Stedman)
  182. 182. 179
  183. 183. 180 Let the games begin! A ski jumper flies off the Olympic jump at Intervales.
  184. 184. 181 Grooming the jump.
  185. 185. 182 Officials gather at the base of the jump where Japanese jumper Yoichi Takata lies, knocked unconscious and suffering a dislocated shoulder after turning over twice in midair and landing on his back during the Special Jump event.
  186. 186. 183 The parking lot for the Intervales ski jump during the 1932 Olympics.
  187. 187. 184 The U.S. ski team.
  188. 188. 185 The Japanese ski team.
  189. 189. 186 Another shot of the Japanese Olympians.
  190. 190. 187 The Norwegian Olympic Nordic ski team.
  191. 191. 188 The Rudd brothers, from Norway.
  192. 192. 189 Sven Utterstrom, Sweden, winner of the gold medal in Nordic skiing.
  193. 193. 190 Crowds gathered on the Zig Zag curve.
  194. 194. 191 Unidentified two-man bob team
  195. 195. 192 Hubert and Curtis Stevens, Placid men who won the gold medal in two-man bobsled
  196. 196. 193 Billy Fiske’s four-man U.S. bob team. Fiske, just 20 years old, had already won Olympic gold on a five-man sled four years earlier in St. Moritz
  197. 197. 194 Billy Fiske and teammates Edward Eagan, Clifford Gray, Jay O’Brien.
  198. 198. 195 Billy Fiske’s team shoots down the track at Mount Van Hoevenberg.
  199. 199. 196 Gold medalists Billy Fiske and team at the four-man bob award ceremony.
  200. 200. 197 Werner Zahn (in overcoat), captain of the 1931 world-champion German bobsled team, presenting the Martineau Challenge Cup to Billy Fiske. On the far left is Paul Stevens of the second-place U.S. bob team.
  201. 201. 198 This was an extraordinary gesture of good sportsmanship. Zahn had lost two experimental sleds in his warm-up heats on the Mount Van Hoevenberg run, forcing him out of the 1932 Olympics.
  202. 202. 199
  203. 203. 200 A final shot of Billy Fiske and team.
  204. 204. 201 U.S. Olympic bobsled team No. 2 won the silver medal. Calling themselves the Red Devils of Saranac Lake, they were Ed Horton, Paul Stevens, Percy Bryant and Henry Homberger.
  205. 205. 202 USA speed skater Jack Shea in the lead
  206. 206. 203 Jack Shea being awarded one of his two gold medals. Godfrey Dewey looks on from the far left.
  207. 207. 204 Jack Shea poses for his trading card.
  208. 208. 205 The second heat of the 10,000-meter speed skating race. Though two Norwegians are in the lead here, it was American Irving Jaffee, closely tailing them, who eventually proved to be the winner.
  209. 209. 206 Distance speed skater Irving Jaffee, of New York City, took gold in both the 5,000-meter and 10,000-meter races.
  210. 210. 207 Double-gold medalist Irving Jaffee, left, poses with three other members of the 1932 U.S. Olympic speed skating team.
  211. 211. 208 Andree and Pierre Brunet, of France, gold medalists in the pairs figure skating competition. (Photo Roger I. Moore)
  212. 212. 209 16-year-old figure skating legend Sonja Henie in the Lake Placid Olympic Fieldhouse. (Photo Roger I. Moore)
  213. 213. 210 Figure skaters Sonja Henie, Karl Schafer, Hedy Stenof
  214. 214. 211 Phil Taylor, of England, conducts a stunt- skating exhibition during the 1932 Olympics.
  215. 215. 212 Canada’s undefeated Olympic hockey team; sweater letters indicate the players are from Winnipeg.
  216. 216. 213 Dejected Polish goalie Josef Stogowski waits for yet another puck to go into his net as Canada shuts out Poland 10-to-0.
  217. 217. 214 Group photo of the New York State Police contingent assigned to the 1932 Olympic Winter Games in Lake Placid.
  218. 218. 215 A group photo of the Lake Placid Olympic Committee staff.
  219. 219. 216 Closeup: At center is Mary C. Landon (later Mary MacKenzie), who compiled the slides contained in this historic collection. In 1930, at age 16, Mary’s first job after graduating Lake Placid High School was to work as the assistant to Ernest Gamache, executive secretary of the local Olympic organizing committee.

This is the largest, most comprehensive collection in existence of images depicting the history of Lake Placid, consisting of the 333 historic slides compiled by the late public historian Mary MacKenzie, digitally restored by Lee Manchester. TO PURCHASE A BOUND, PRINT EDITION, GO TO http://stores.lulu.com/marymackenzie

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