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Kvf manual handling session

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Delivered to commercial vehicle repair, agricultural engineering, parts and distribution depots throughout the UK

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Kvf manual handling session

  1. 1. Manual Handling by Lee Kennedy KVF Consultants Ltd.
  2. 2. Introductions  Introduction  Health & safety  Mobile phones  Breaks  Behaviour  Comfort Breaks
  3. 3. Today’s Training Programme  Causes of Back Pain  Anatomy and Injury  Legislation and Risk Assessment  Correct Body Mechanics and Practical Techniques  Video / DVD  Summary and Test
  4. 4. What Risks? Spot the hazards!
  5. 5. Manual Handling Definition: The application of human effort directly, or indirectly, to transport or support a load
  6. 6. Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 – amended 2002  Applies to:  Lifting, lowering, pulling or pushing  Inanimate loads – box or trolley  Animate – animal or person
  7. 7. Manual Handling Hazards  Lifting a load that is too heavy or cumbersome- back injuries  Failing to use a proper lifting/moving technique- back injuries (Twisting, Stooping, Reaching)  Failing to grip the load in safe manner-feet injuries  Not wearing correct PPE-hand injuries
  8. 8. Areas of the Body Injured by Manual Handling Finger/Thumb 14% Back 49% Rest Of Torso 7% Arm 10% Hand/Wrist 9% Legs 8% Other 3% Source: HSE
  9. 9. Why Are Back Problems Increasing? Two Key Reasons: 1. Our physical condition 2. Increased Medical Management
  10. 10. Back Problems Back problems are seldom caused by a single injury The Final Straw !
  11. 11. 5 Generic Reasons for Back Pain  Poor posture  Lifting and handling incorrectly  Stress  Lifestyle  Can stem from a poor level of physical fitness
  12. 12. 20 30 32 35 40 50 57 60 BackProblems Age in Years Back Problems Peak Between the Ages of Thirty and Fifty
  13. 13. Questions?
  14. 14. How Does My Back Work? • 3 Natural curves • 33 Vertebrae forming a flexible column • Cervical = 7 • Thoracic = 12 • Lumbar = 5 • Sacrum = 5 • Coccyx = 4
  15. 15. • Ligaments – Hold the bones together and add stability of the spine. • Spinal Cord – Passes down through the middle of the spinal canal. It is therefore protected by the vertebrae. • Spinal Nerves – Branch off at each level of the vertebral column and carry nerve impulses (sensory & motor). • Intervertebral Disc – Separate the bones and act as a shock absorbers. They allow free movement.
  16. 16. Bones and Joints
  17. 17. Spinal Joints & Discs
  18. 18. Slipped/Prolapsed disc  A slipped disc/prolapsed disc occurs when the annulus gradually crack open allowing part or all the nucleus to prolapsed or seep out at the back of the disc close to the spinal nerves of the spinal cord are. This puts pressure on the nerves causing severe pain  This is caused by adopting poor posture e.g. Bending, stretching twisting and overreaching
  19. 19. Sciatica  More commonly known as a “trapped nerve”  Sciatic nerve is largest nerve in body consisting of 5 nerve roots.  Sciatic Nerve most likely to be trapped as it leaves the vertebrae as it passes to the pelvis  Could be any of the 5 vertebrae of the lumber spine
  20. 20. Sciatica • Caused by a damaged disc pressing on nerve root in lower back • Pain in rear or leg, worse when sitting • Burning/tingling down the leg •Shooting pain that makes it difficult to stand up • Constant pain on one side of the rear
  21. 21. Other Reasons for Back Pain  Osteoarthritis  Referred Injury
  22. 22. Risk Factors for Yourselves  In a rush to do a task  Awkward / critical lifting  Cold  Uncontrolled situations  Inactivity - sitting
  23. 23. and …… YOUR LIFESTYLE Stressful lifestyle Poor physical fitness Bad mattress and pillow
  24. 24. Avoid  Does the object need to be moved?  Can the process be automated?  Consider mechanisation / handling aids.  Conveyor  Pallet truck  Electric or powered hoist  Lift truck
  25. 25. Assess Does the task involve?  Holding loads away from the body  Twisting, stooping or reaching upwards  Long carrying distances  Strenuous pushing or pulling  Repetitive handling  Insufficient rest or recovery time
  26. 26. Reduce  To the lowest level “reasonably practicable”  TIME v EFFORT v MONEY in proportion to the benefits  Mechanical aids can reduce the risk  They can also improve productivity
  27. 27. Employees Duties  Safe systems of work  Proper use of equipment  Co-operation with employer  Inform employer of hazardous activities  Do not put others at risk
  28. 28. Questions?
  29. 29. Good Handling Technique for Lifting  Plan the lift  Can an aid be used?  Where’s it going  Do I need help?  Will I need to rest?
  30. 30. Good Handling Technique for Lifting The 1 minute Risk Assessment
  31. 31. Good Handling Technique for Lifting  T - TASK  I - INDIVIDUAL  L - LOAD  E - ENVIRONMENT
  32. 32. Task Twisting Bending Stooping Reaching Carrying Pushing Pulling Repetitive Lifting Lowering Prolonged Physical Effort
  33. 33. Task – reducing the injury Can you?  Use a lifting aid?  Improve workplace layout?  Reduce amount of twisting & stooping?  Avoid lifting from floor to above shoulder height  Reduce carrying distances?  Push rather than Pull
  34. 34. Individual Pregnant? Trained? Physical condition? Age? Special Strength Required? Warmed Up? Suitable Clothing? Tall or Short?
  35. 35. Individual – reducing the injury Can you:  Pay particular attention to those who have a physical weakness  Take extra care of pregnant workers  Give your colleagues more info. Eg the range of tasks they are likely to face  Provide more training  Get advice from Occupational health if needed
  36. 36. Load  Heavy?  Bulky or Unwieldy?  Difficult to Grasp?  Unstable or Contents Likely to Shift?  Sharp – Rough – Hot – Potentially Damaging?
  37. 37. Load – reducing the injury Can you make the load:  Lighter or less bulky  Easier to grasp  More stable  Less damaging to hold  If the load comes from elsewhere, have you asked the employer to help – handles or smaller packages
  38. 38. Environment Space constraints? Uneven/slippery floor? Poor lighting conditions?
  39. 39. Environment – reducing the injury Can you:  Remove obstructions to free movement  Provide better flooring  Avoid steps & steep ramps  Prevent extremes of hot & cold  Wear less restrictive PPE  Improve lighting  Ensure PPE is correct for the task
  40. 40. Engage ‘TILE’ to Avoid! The Brickies?
  41. 41. Questions?
  42. 42. Correct Lifting Procedure Challenge!! A volunteer please to show us how they lift – the rest of the group decide and we’ll discuss
  43. 43. Good Handling Technique for Lifting •Adopt a stable position •Feet apart – 10 and 2 position •Positioned either side of the load •Maintain balance
  44. 44. Good Handling Technique for Lifting At the start of the lift – •Slightly bend the back, hips and knees •Do not stoop! •Grip the load with the hands – not with just the fingers!
  45. 45. Good Handling Technique for Lifting •Keep the head up when handling •Look ahead and not down at the load •Keep the load close to the body •The heaviest side should be the side nearest the body
  46. 46. Good Handling Technique for Lifting •Avoid twisting the back or leaning sideways •Keep shoulders level facing in the same direction as the hips •Turn by moving the feet
  47. 47. Good Handling Technique for Lifting  Move smoothly  Do not jerk or snatch the load  This can be harder to control and can increase the risk of injury
  48. 48. Good Lifting Technique Put Down-Then Adjust  The exact reverse of the lift  One foot forward 10 o’clock & 2 o’clock  Sink slowly down- place the load  Position the load once on the ground
  49. 49. Remember – Good Handling Technique for Lifting  Do not lift or handle more than your limit  There is a difference between what you can lift and what can be safely lifted
  50. 50. Practical Activity
  51. 51. Questions?
  52. 52. Lifting Guidelines
  53. 53. Twisting  Reduce guideline weights if:  The handler twists beyond 45 by 10%  The handler twists beyond 90 by 20%
  54. 54. Frequent Lifting  Infrequent operators = 30 operations per hour  Once or twice per minute reduce by 30%  5 to 8 per minute reduce by 50%  More than 12 per minute reduce by 80%
  55. 55. If You Hurt Your Back  Report the incident to your line manager as soon as possible  Seek medical advice if in acute pain or symptoms last longer than 72 hours  Contact the Occupational Health Department for advice
  56. 56. Questions?
  57. 57. Test Time!!
  58. 58. Summary
  59. 59. Remember! Healthy disc Severely unhealthy disc
  60. 60. Lifting Techniques
  61. 61. Questions?

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