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Bridging the Digital Divide: The Role of Librarians in Global and Disaster Health

Lebanese Library Association
May. 30, 2021
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Bridging the Digital Divide: The Role of Librarians in Global and Disaster Health

  1. Bridging the digital divide: the role of librarians in global and disaster health Dr Anne Brice Head of Knowledge Management Public Health England Convenor, IFLA E4GDH Special Interest Group
  2. Bridging the digital divide: the role of librarians in global and disaster health
  3. “We live in a world where disease and disaster know no borders. An interconnected world, where every nation's health and security is dependent on that of other countries worldwide. Work to protect and improve the public’s health, and to reduce inequalities, must be global too.” Duncan Selbie, CE, Public Health England “When disaster occurs, there is often an appeal for money and money is often needed but what is always needed is knowledge”. Professor Sir Muir Gray
  4. Calls to action … “leadership will be essential for building knowledge and library service provision and knowledge management to support global health, and disaster and emergency preparedness. .. …. Without this vital expertise and associated resources we would not be able to adequately collaborate and implement the three 2015 UN Landmark Agreements on disaster risk reduction, Sustainable Development Goals and the Climate Change Agreement” Professor Virginia Murray Consultant in Global Disaster Risk Reduction, PHE Member: Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR) scientific committee Co-Chair: IRDR Disaster Data Loss Project (DATA) project Member: UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network DATA Member: WHO Collaborating Centre on Mass Gatherings and Global Health Security Visiting Professor UNU-International Institute of Global Health IFLA Special Meeting 21/08/17 Call to action
  5. The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015- 2030 In 2015 the United Nations adopted three landmark agreements: • Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 • The Sustainable Development Goals of Agenda 2030 • The Paris Agreement on Climate Change TheSendaiFrameworkwill“strengthen technical and scientific capacity to capitalize on and consolidate existing knowledge and to develop and apply methodologies and models to assess disaster risks, vulnerabilities and exposure to all hazards; (paragraph 24 j) S
  6. The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015- 2030 “strengthen the evidence base in support of … implementation” “to promote and support the availability and application of science and technology to decision-making; to use post-disaster reviews as opportunities to enhance learning and public policy; and to disseminate studies” “the scientific and technical work on disaster risk reduction and its mobilization through the coordination of existing networks and scientific research institutions at all levels and in all regions” S
  7. Natural hazards
  8. Natural hazards Technological hazards
  9. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease
  10. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards
  11. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards
  12. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards
  13. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards Geopolitical and post conflict hazards
  14. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards Geopolitical and post conflict hazards Violence and terrorism hazards
  15. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards Geopolitical and post conflict hazards Violence and terrorism hazards Externality, space weather and meteors
  16. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards Geopolitical and post conflict hazards Violence and terrorism hazards Externality, space weather and meteors Trade Dispute hazards
  17. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards Geopolitical and post conflict hazards Violence and terrorism hazards Externality, space weather and meteors Trade Dispute hazards Financial Shock hazards
  18. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards Geopolitical and post conflict hazards Violence and terrorism hazards Externality, space weather and meteors Trade Dispute hazards Financial Shock hazards Cyber hazards
  19. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards Geopolitical and post conflict hazards Violence and terrorism hazards Externality, space weather and meteors Trade Dispute hazards Financial Shock hazards Cyber hazards Transport accident hazards
  20. Natural hazards Technological hazards Disease Environmental hazards Climatic hazards Humanitarian hazards Geopolitical and post conflict hazards Violence and terrorism hazards Externality, space weather and meteors Trade Dispute hazards Financial Shock hazards Cyber hazards Transport accident hazards …. other hazards?
  21. Summary
  22. Bridging the digital divide: the role of librarians in global and disaster health
  23. Advocacy: Global action to build the potential for librarians to play an enhanced, pivotal role in the production, organisation, assessment and deployment of information for global and disaster health, including disaster preparedness and risk reduction. Training and Mentoring: Using face-to-face meetings & virtual learning interventions to help librarians gain the skills, capabilities, and confidence to respond to new and emerging roles in DRR and global health, and make sure that opportunities are targeted at areas of most need Activity mapping and resource production. Producing high-quality resources and aligning with existing initiatives to promote evidence-based practice, provide better value, and reduce duplication.
  24. Community based, but globally connected. Focus on principles and values aimed at inclusion and diversity – belief in the right to reliable healthcare information for all Evidence-based and measuring value and impact– work in every sector and sphere Ethical profession values based on IFLA Global Vision, and robust standards and processes User focused, working with key partners including library and non-library stakeholders, organisations and networks to share knowledge and expertise
  25. Evidence Briefing • Digital divide with regards to access to content, and infrastructure • Access to timely, accurate, and quality health information and data for disaster teams is essential. • New roles include Knowledge Brokers, Global Health Informationist or Disaster Information Specialists. • Libraries, in particular public libraries, can be used as a charging station, Internet connection point, warming centre, meeting point, communication channel, pre-departure training providers • Knowledge management tools are available to support global health but not often to all • Social media can be used effectively but has dangers in misinformation • Awareness of local context is vital
  26. Healthcare Information for All: discussion • Digital divide is not just during times of crisis • Terminology and language is a potential barrier • All countries need to cascade readiness plans and processes to rural, lay, media and professional stakeholders, well before epidemics strike • Huge gap between what is needed and what is available - no one player has the capacity to deliver to their full potential • We should increase our people-to people mutual exchange and understanding, even if we have completely different systems • The power of prevention • Knowledge is the enemy of disease
  27. Roles and Skills? Roles • Expert searchers • Systemic reviewers • Knowledge managers • Knowledge brokers • Research needs and gaps • Marketers and publicists • Health and digital literacy • Policy and strategy leads Skills • Information science • Scholarly publication, OS and OA • Evidence based practice • Research Methods/Ethics • Communication and writing skills • Teaching and learning • Negotiation skills All of the above!
  28. What do our users say? o Librarians provide wise advice of how to collate resources to build evidence for DRR o Librarians identify relevant information sources to answer focused DRR questions o Librarians are aware of how to manage and appraise the evidence retrieved, so that it can be applied in practice. o Make the work I do safer by ensuring that as much as possible is evidence informed o Librarians are key to ensure quality and confidence in completeness o Librarians help ensure that the searching for systematic reviews is comprehensive o Librarians ensure complete searches and facilitate the building of evidence to inform practice for DRR o Librarians suggest ways of looking for relevant material that I would not have thought of o Librarians help me understand why bibliographic databases such as PubMed do things that confuse or surprise me
  29. Bridging the digital divide: the role of librarians in global and disaster health
  30. E4GDH and the Knowledge Cycle Questions Production Organising Mobilising Translating and using Evaluation and monitoring Knowledge from research Knowledge from data Knowledge from experience IFLA Special Meeting 21/08/17 Call to action C
  31. What do we need to do? • Understand the concepts of AI and machine learning • Develop better evaluation methodologies that take account of needs • Sponsor, develop and share community-based assets • Effective evidence-base for our own work, all three types • Cross-disciplinary collaboration and co-operation • Capacity and capability, so training and skills • Promote sustainability and equity – librarians are trusted assets • Advocate
  32. “To be an information professional or a librarian is to be someone who believes they can change the world for the better through knowledge.” Professor R.D.Lankes, CILIP Conference keynote, 2015
  33. Thank you • anne.brice@phe.gov.uk • https://www.ifla.org/e4gdh
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