Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict

488 views

Published on

When it comes to resolving conflict within teams, much of the advice you read is about the conversations that take place in groups. However, educators set the stage for productive conflict by creating the right culture, well before any of those conversations take place. See how three experts establish a culture that encourages productive and healthy conflict.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
488
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict

  1. 1. Source: Armstrong, A. (2014, Winter). Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict. ToolsforLearningSchools.17(2). (pp. 1-3). Title Body Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict
  2. 2. This presentation is a supplement to the full article. Download more information, resources, and tools to help you implement these ideas in Tools for Learning Schools (Winter, 2014). Available at www.learningforward. org/publications/tools-for-learning- schools. Download the article and accompanying tools
  3. 3. “If you have learned how to disagree without being disagreeable, then you have discovered the secret of getting along – whether it be business, family relations, or life itself.” — Bernard Meltzer
  4. 4. Source: Armstrong, A. (2014, Winter). Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict. ToolsforLearningSchools.17(2). (pp. 1-3). “Everything we do emanates from our‘why,’our deeper purpose for existence. If there is a belief that the kids will do better if the team works together, productive conflict has a healthy place to grow and breathe and thrive. ... It compels us to engage in the productive conflict we need.” -Kenneth Williams Shared purpose
  5. 5. Source: Armstrong, A. (2014, Winter). Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict. ToolsforLearningSchools.17(2). (pp. 1-3). Norms guide the work towards a common goal and move confrontations away from the personal and toward alignment with a school or system’s larger purpose and goals. Norms
  6. 6. Source: Armstrong, A. (2014, Winter). Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict. ToolsforLearningSchools.17(2). (pp. 1-3). What happens when someone violates a norm? Use accountability protocols to • Depersonalize accountability; • Create consistency; • Establish predictability; and • Hold each other accountable in a respectful and dignified manner. Accountability protocols
  7. 7. Source: Armstrong, A. (2014, Winter). Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict. ToolsforLearningSchools.17(2). (pp. 1-3). Strong communication creates cultures that facilitate productive conflicts. Include teacher and principal voice. Clear communication
  8. 8. Source: Armstrong, A. (2014, Winter). Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict. ToolsforLearningSchools.17(2). (pp. 1-3). Leadership outlook and perspective is important — a negative attitude will trickle down. Positive conflict • Spurs innovation; • Brings disparate ideas together; and • Helps mitigate risk. Positive attitude
  9. 9. Source: Armstrong, A. (2014, Winter). Build a culture that nurtures productive conflict. ToolsforLearningSchools.17(2). (pp. 1-3). Be open to perspectives that may bring alternative ideas, even if they do not come from someone traditionally thought of as an“expert.” Valued contributions
  10. 10. Learn more with Learn more about professional learning at all levels of education with Learning Forward, an international nonprofit association of learning educators: www.learningforward.org Membership in Learning Forward gives you access to a wide range of publications, tools, and opportunities to advance professional learning for student success.

×