Kanban - An Evolutionary Approach to Agility

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Jon Terry, COO of LeanKit put together this presentation on Kanban - An Evolutionary Approach to Agile.

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Kanban - An Evolutionary Approach to Agility

  1. 1. Team Members and Stakeholders can:Kanban An Evolutionary Approach to Agility
  2. 2. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Jon Terry is Chief Operating Officer of LeanKit. Before LeanKit, Jon held a number of senior IT positions with hospital-giant HCA and its subsidiary, HealthTrust Purchasing Group. He was among those responsible for launching HCA’s adoption of Lean/Agile methods. Jon earned his Global Executive MBA from Georgetown University and ESADE Business School in Barcelona, Spain, and his Masters Certificate in Project Management from George Washington University. He is a Project Management Professional, a Certified Scrum Master and a Kanban Coaching Professional. follow @leankitjon ABOUT JON TERRY
  3. 3. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Agile Scrum XP Lean / Kanban Agile Scrum Avoid a narrow IT- focused view of modern management methods
  4. 4. Team Members and Stakeholders can: 1960s-1980s 1980s 1990s 2000s Today TOC Just-In-Time Kanban Lean Manufacturing Lean Healthcare Lean Software Development Lean Construction Toyota Production System Six Sigma TQM Agile XP Scrum Focus on rapid flow and feedback vs. planning and “efficiency.” A Broader Perspective
  5. 5. Team Members and Stakeholders can: 1. Visualize the (current) workflow 2. Implement feedback loops 3. Manage (for smooth) flow 4. Make process policies explicit 5. Limit Work-in-Progress (WIP) * 6. Improve collaboratively using Kanban to become Lean THE KANBAN METHOD Evolution The quickest path to agility is to start from where you are today. * Often implicitly at first
  6. 6. Team Members and Stakeholders can: This is Greek to me. So are many/most project deliverables to non-specialists
  7. 7. Team Members and Stakeholders can: A picture translates complexity into a simple pattern we can all digest
  8. 8. Team Members and Stakeholders can: 1. Have each team member write down a few of their current work items 2. Ask each person to pick one at a time 3. Have them describe: – What am I doing to it now? – Who had it before and what were they doing with it? – Who will I hand it to next, to do what? Visualize Workflow Map out your real, current process
  9. 9. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Cards are (usually) nouns, lanes are verbs
  10. 10. Team Members and Stakeholders can: 1. Have each team member list their current workload 2. Have them assign each item a type: UX feature, API feature, defect, task, etc 3. Collate the work types they defined into one list and assign each a card color 4. Turn the lists into cards and place them in the correct lane on the board Catalog the Work As the manager, only add your “official” list after.
  11. 11. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Be succinct and focus on results. Try to limit types of work
  12. 12. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Stop at current state, resist the urge to “improve” now
  13. 13. Team Members and Stakeholders can: 1. Allow a fixed time period – 10- 15 min 2. Ensure board is complete & accurate 3. Are there expedites or blockers? 4. Otherwise, walk the board from right to left a card at a time – What’s needed to advance this item? – Who can help? 5. Stop when time runs out Feedback Loops Daily standups focus on value & completion, not activity
  14. 14. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Hold regular retrospectives …. but stop- the-line for bottlenecks
  15. 15. Team Members and Stakeholders can: 1. Why? Why? Why? Why? Why? 2. Common root cause answers: – Hidden WIP – Stop starting, start finishing – Downstream/external blockages – Uneven sizing – Parallel processes – Rework 3. Let data be your guide Feedback Loops Retrospectives focus on critical issues, & small incremental changes
  16. 16. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Control charts allow targeted process improvement Easily see typical delivery patterns vs outliers and drill into them
  17. 17. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Look for trends in your delivery speed for different work In time, better decomposition & effective categorization can replace estimates
  18. 18. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Splitting process steps into active/waiting queues makes flow more clear
  19. 19. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Swimlanes can represent different workflows or partner teams
  20. 20. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Once work visible & process is clear, WIP limits can balance capacity
  21. 21. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Eliminate Waste Build Quality In Create Knowledge Defer Commitment Deliver Fast Respect People Optimize the Whole Lean PD System Process 1. Work-In-Process 2. Delays 3. Extra Features 4. Technical Debt 5. Handoffs 6. Task Switching 7. Defects Lean Principles nicely map to & enhance Agile IT best practices
  22. 22. Team Members and Stakeholders can: 1. Visualize the (current) workflow 2. Implement feedback loops 3. Manage (for smooth) flow 4. Make process policies explicit 5. Limit Work-in-Progress (WIP) * 6. Improve collaboratively using Kanban to become Lean THE KANBAN METHOD REITERATED Evolution The quickest path to agility is to start from where you are today. * Often implicitly at first
  23. 23. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Release 1 Iteration 1 Iteration Planning Daily Standup Demo / Retro Iteration n Iteration Planning Daily Standup Demo / Retro Iteration Backlog Fixed Time and Resource Not Done Iteration Backlog Not Done Product Owner Ideas Product Backlog Release Planning Release Backlog Scrum mandates new roles, “rituals” and cadence for a small team. THE SCRUM PROCESS Scrum master
  24. 24. Team Members and Stakeholders can: Scrum • A structure of new roles, “rituals” and cadence • No prohibition against visualization, WIP limitation or flow measurement • A mature scrum team with good technical practices often looks awfully Kanban-ish Kanban • Evolution through measurement • No opinion on roles or iterations • Software dev teams who use Kanban to become more Agile often act quite Scrum-my WHERE’S THE CONFLICT? You can do both.
  25. 25. Team Members and Stakeholders can: The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win Gene Kim, Kevin Behr, George Spafford Implementing Lean Software Development: From concept to cash Mary and Tom Poppendieck Kanban: Successful evolutionary change for your technology business David J. Anderson LeanKit.com for blog posts, case studies, and more! FURTHER LEARNING Thank You!

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