Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Measuring sources of brand equity By Leroy J. Ebert

542 views

Published on

Measuring Sources of Brand Equity
Content Extracted from “Strategic Brand Management” 3rd Edition
Authors: Kevin Lane Keller
M.G. Parameswaran
Issac Jacob

Presentation developed from SLIM Diploma In Brand Management Students

Presentation developed by Leroy J. Ebert (25th April 2014)

Published in: Marketing, Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Measuring sources of brand equity By Leroy J. Ebert

  1. 1. Leroy J. Ebert DipM MCIM, Chartered Marketer, MSLIM Manager Marketing and Business Development – Logiwiz Ltd. Presentation Developed as Course Material for the SLIM Diploma in Brand Management
  2. 2. • This is the most simplest and often the most powerful way to profile brand associations • What comes to mind when they think of a brand? • Can identify the range of possible brand associations • Can provide some rough indication of the relative strength, favourability and uniqueness of brand associations
  3. 3. • What do you like best about the brand? What are its positive aspects? • What do you dislike? What are its disadvantages • What do you find unique about the brand? How different from other brands? In what ways is it the same?
  4. 4. • Consumers do not open up to interviews and in focused groups • They may not want be willing or unable to reveal their true feelings • Tapping into consumers: free association and Projective Techniques Page 363 Figure 9-3 • Rorschach test
  5. 5. • The bubble test
  6. 6. • Compare a brand to people, country, animal, activities, fabric, occupation, car, magazines, vegetables, nationalities or even other brands • Remember to ask follow up questions to understand why they associated the brand to their selection • Helps with identifying the brand imagery
  7. 7. Association MR RW Car Country Brand Animal Vegetable
  8. 8. • ZMET • Example of ZMET
  9. 9. • Brand personality is the human characteristics or traits that consumers can attribute to a brand. • The simplest way to measure it is to solicit open ended responses to probe • If the brand were to come alive as a person, what would it be like? • What would it do? • Where would it live? • What would it wear?
  10. 10. • The need to improve research out come has driven researchers into more experiential • Customers do not open up in a formal setup • Agencies and brand owners are increasingly studying consumers at home, in office, how they communicate between each other, consume the product • As differential advantages are been challenged brands need to find emotional links that can build strong associations with the customers
  11. 11. • Leverage the visits you already make by coordinating them via perennial questions and logging and reviewing customer profiles • Take every opportunity to ask questions (for instance, formally set aside an hour to solicit feedback • Get engineers in front of customers, not just marketers • Conduct programmatic visits • Visit different kind of customers • Get out of the conference room
  12. 12. • Helps researchers draw numerical representations and summaries • For example quantitative measures of brand knowledge can help to better assess the depth and breath of brand awareness, the strength, favourability, uniqueness of the brand associations
  13. 13. • Ability to identify various brand elements like the brand name, logo, symbol, character etc. • Recognition – packaging, brand elements, partial lettering • Recall – aided, unaided • Correction for Guessing • Strategic Implications
  14. 14. Content Extracted from “Strategic Brand Management” 3rd Edition Authors: Kevin Lane Keller M.G. Parameswaran Issac Jacob Presentation developed from SLIM Diploma In Brand Management Students Presentation developed by Leroy J. Ebert (25th April 2014)

×