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Open Pedagogy: Teaching with WordPress & the CUNY Academic Commons

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Presentation at NYCDH Week, February 2019 @ The Graduate Center, CUNY

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Open Pedagogy: Teaching with WordPress & the CUNY Academic Commons

  1. 1. Open Pedagogy: Teaching with WordPress & the Laurie Hurson Teaching and Learning Center The Graduate Center ,CUNY NYCDH Week 2019 Slides were created by Laurie Hurson and Krystyna Michael and are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Public License
  2. 2. Workshop Overview Slides http://bit.ly/nycdh_open 1. Defining Open 2. Teaching with WordPress 3. Open Digital Pedagogy 4. Exploring Course Models 5. Building a Course Site 6. Open Digital Tools 7. Considerations
  3. 3. “Open” ● What do we we mean by “open”? ● Have you used any open teaching methods in the past? ● What are different ways to make a class “open”? ● Why open teaching? Benefits and challenges of openness? ● What do you most want to discuss about “open teaching”?
  4. 4. “Open”● Accessible, to read, to understand to copy (open source) ● Free ● Cultural change - different use of materials ● New ways to get information ● sharing,remixable ● Locally relevant, collaborative creation, grassroots development ● Open code, open documentation ● Disruptive, resistant, incorporates new voices
  5. 5. TEACHING PLATFORMS → What platforms do you use in your teaching?
  6. 6. Why teach with or ? → Open source web framework → Customization & Flexibility (Themes) → Free and open software add-ons (Plugins) → Shared creation/production, peer-to-peer connections → Public visibility options, audience consideration → Develop Digital Literacy → Exploration of new pedagogies
  7. 7. OPEN DIGITAL PEDAGOGY (“ODP”) “Use of cost-free, publicly available online tools and platforms by instructors and students for teaching, learning, and communicating in support of educational goals“ (Rosen & Smale, 2015; Hybrid Pedagogy) → Free/Libre: Free beer vs. free speech → Open-source web platforms → Free digital tools → OER: Open Educational Resources
  8. 8. OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES “any type of educational materials that are in the public domain or introduced with an open license… anyone can legally and freely copy, use, adapt and re-share them.”(UNESCO) OER can be: → Textbooks, literature in public domain, primary sources → Podcasts and audio recordings → Videos and images → Assignments, lesson plans, course modules, syllabi → Digital tools, platforms
  9. 9. OER EXAMPLES SmartHistory: engaging videos and essays that cover all eras of art history, ranging from the paleolithic to the present ScienceForward: videos and resources that introduce science as way of exploring the world; focuses on the critical thinking skills in use across the scientific disciplines Art History Teaching Resources: online repository of art history teaching content Equality Archive: multimodal archive with entries focused on the history of sex and gender equality in the United States The American Yawp: crowd-sourced US History Textbook → More @ teachOER.org
  10. 10. CREATIVE COMMONS Enables sharing and reuse of creativity and knowledge through the provision of free legal tools “Licenses are legal tools that creators and other rights holders can use to offer certain usage rights to the public, while reserving other rights” → Best known for CC Licenses that determine how digital work can be used, shared, edited, etc.
  11. 11. .com ● Wordpress-hosted ● Freemium model ● WP-provided themes ● No plugins ● WP Terms of service ● site.wordpress.com ● .org ● “Self”-hosted ● Free & Open ● WP & custom themes ● Plugins enhance site ● Institutional Affiliation ● site.hostname.edu
  12. 12. .com .org
  13. 13. .com .org
  14. 14. CUNY Academic Commons &
  15. 15. “Courses” Tab → Course models on the CUNY Academic Commons
  16. 16. OPEN TEACHING MODELS Technologies of Reading ● Online discussion through blogs and commenting, Commonplace books as multimodal composition, Projects utilize other open tools Music Since 1945 ● Private listening assignments, public ‘collaborative’ blog, event attendance as experiential learning Principles of New Media ● Private site with entirely open content course materials (OER), students have the option to create public-facing final projects Slides: http://bit.ly/nycdh_open
  17. 17. Go through models
  18. 18. Open Teaching Techniques ● Developing weekly deliverables in digital spaces ● Scaffolding assignments and digital skills and literacies ● Offering private + public spaces for work and reflection ● Choosing responsive + accessible technologies ● Creating multimodal, media-integrated assignments ● Using digital tools to expand learning opportunities ● Bridging course content with public events to foster experiential learning
  19. 19. Building a Site • Dashboard: “the backend” for editing • Site Visibility: Privacy settings • Posts and Pages: adding content • Creating Links • Uploading and adding pictures and media • Posts: Categories, Tags • Pages: Static homepage • Disabling Comments • Appearance • Menus: Site Architecture • Widgets: Sidebars • Themes: Site Design • Plugins: Adding Tools and Functionality
  20. 20. TO DO List: Site Content Creation 1. View the “front end” of your site 2. Navigate to the “back end” of your site AKA Dashboard 3. Edit your site visibility in Settings > Reading 4. Add a Page called “Home” for static welcome content 5. Add another Page for static content (I.e. syllabus, grading information) 6. Add a Page called “Blog” (I’ll explain later… in #10) 7. Add a few Posts for dynamic, updating content a. Add media and Hyperlinks to a post 8. Add categories for your posts in Posts>Categories 9. Go back to your list Posts and “bulk edit” to categorize them 10. In Settings > Reading Set up a static “Home” Page and re-route Posts to the “Blog”
  21. 21. TO DO List: Site Design and Customization 1. Now that you have some content, create a custom menu in Appearance>Menus. “Manage Location” to set the menu in place. 2. Try out a few themes in Appearance >Themes 3. Depending on your theme: Add a custom header or featured images by uploading openly-licensed media. Themes will often suggest the size for header images in Appearance > Customize > Header 4. Once you decide on a theme, add content and information to the sidebar areas in Appearance>Widgets 5. What other functionality is possible? Peruse Plugins to determine if you want to add any other tools to your site. Don’t go too crazy activating Plugins. Activate one or two, see if you need it and, deactivate as needed
  22. 22. Open digital tools 1. Timeline JS (knightLab) 2. StoryMaps JS 3. Hypothesis for social annotation 4. Manifold for open texts
  23. 23. Timeline JS
  24. 24. Timeline JS
  25. 25. A Conversation in the Margins!
  26. 26. English Students annotating Bartleby.com Elisa Beshero-Bondar, University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg
  27. 27. Manifold • Intuitive, Collaborative, open source web platform for scholarly publishing • Allows you to: – Publish dynamic course editions of texts in the public domain – Include supplementary notes, videos, or other resources – Annotate texts collaboratively
  28. 28. Creating an Annotation
  29. 29. Threaded Annotations Paul Hebert’s class version of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
  30. 30. Open Teaching Techniques ● Developing weekly deliverables in digital spaces ● Scaffolding assignments and digital skills and literacies ● Offering private + public spaces for work and reflection ● Choosing responsive + accessible technologies ● Creating multimodal, media-integrated assignments ● Using digital tools to expand learning opportunities ● Bridging course content with public events to foster experiential learning
  31. 31. Considerations ● Log in ○ Do students need to make an account? ● Learning curve ○ How difficult is it to get the hang of using this tool? Does it require knowledge of other platforms? ● Relationship to content ○ ● Affordances ○ Is this tool more likely to foster engagement or distract or confuse students? ● Accessibility ○ Can students access this tool on their phones? Is it accessible for students using screen readers?
  32. 32. Contact Information Laurie Hurson, GC TLC: lhurson@gc.cuny.edu Commons HELP: https://help.commons.gc.cuny.edu WordPress Codex: codex.wordpress.org

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