Page 1 of 19
PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The Master of Education with a concentration in Curriculum and Instructional
Technology prep...
Page 2 of 19
Core Courses (3):
EDUC 991 Philosophy of Education and Teaching Practice
EDUC 998 Language Development and Co...
Page 3 of 19
There are four graduation dates per year during which diplomas are issued:
December, January, May and August....
Page 4 of 19
the preparation of educators. These experiences need to address the five
Professional Standards for Teachers ...
Page 5 of 19
Portfolio requirements: The portfolio must be designed to reflect your direct
field experiences with students...
Page 6 of 19
attempt to make them “fit” their examination questions. This has not been a
successful approach. If it is a t...
Page 7 of 19
teachers in the interest of eliciting suggestions. What would you suggest
and why?
7. Your school prides itse...
Page 8 of 19
and phone line. However, the school will soon be replaced by a brand new
building. The new school will be net...
Page 9 of 19
inputting data and analyzing the results as seen on a graph, students will learn
how to develop a formula rat...
Page 10 of 19
importance of Inquiry for all students learning to solve complex problems. This
framework, like the others, ...
Page 11 of 19
FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)
Who is my advisor?
Kim Cochrane is your academic advisor. She can be reache...
Page 12 of 19
When and how do I apply for the comprehensive examination and
commencement?
You should apply for both the ex...
Page 13 of 19
For your reference
Massachusetts Department of Education
Education Laws and Regulations
603 CMR 7.00
http://...
Page 14 of 19
b. Employs a variety of content-based and content-oriented teaching
techniques from more teacher-directed st...
Page 15 of 19
3. Maintains interest in current theory, research, and developments in the academic
discipline and exercises...
Page 16 of 19
GENERAL INFORMATION about the
CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY Practicum
1. The practicum is completed ...
Page 17 of 19
FRAMINGHAM STATE UNIVERSITY
Division of Graduate and Continuing Education
APPLICATION FOR A PRACTICUM IN
CUR...
Page 18 of 19
LEVEL: _______________________________
NAME OF SCHOOL __________________________________________________
ADD...
Page 19 of 19
For Office Use Only:
Application Review for _______________________________________________
Practicum in Cur...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

M.ed in cit overview 2013 14 (1)

341 views

Published on

Progra

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
341
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

M.ed in cit overview 2013 14 (1)

  1. 1. Page 1 of 19 PROGRAM OVERVIEW The Master of Education with a concentration in Curriculum and Instructional Technology prepares you to obtain an Initial license as an Instructional Technology Teacher (all levels). For candidates who are seeking their first initial license, a 300-hour practicum experience must also be completed after the successful completion of the program. For candidates who are seeking a second initial license, a 150- hour practicum experience must also be completed after the successful completion of all degree requirements. Prior to applying for the practicum, a passing score for the Communication and Literacy Skills Test of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure™ (MTEL) must be submitted to the FSU Division of Graduate and Continuing Education. Consult http://www.mtel.nesinc.com/ for information about the test. The degree requires successful completion of ten courses, which include three core courses, five concentration courses, and two content electives. Successful completion of an online written comprehensive examination and the submission of an electronic portfolio to the program advisor one week prior to the comprehensive examination are required. The comprehensive examination is taken in the last semester of study. The program is designed to meet the requirements set forth in the Commonwealth’s Regulations for Educator Licensure (603 CMR 7.00). The requirements include subject matter knowledge http://www.doe.mass.edu/lawsregs/603cmr7.html?section=06 and the Professional Standards for Teachers http://www.doe.mass.edu/lawsregs/603cmr7.html?section=08. PROGRAM CHECKLIST The following checklist is aligned with the degree requirements for students who are accepted into the program under the FSU 2013-2014 Graduate Catalog. All courses must be approved, in writing, by your advisor prior to your registration. FRAMINGHAM STATE UNIVERSITY MASTER OF EDUCATION Concentration in CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY
  2. 2. Page 2 of 19 Core Courses (3): EDUC 991 Philosophy of Education and Teaching Practice EDUC 998 Language Development and Communication _____ EDUC 999 Research and Evaluation (recommended after completion of three Concentration or Content Courses) Concentration Courses (5): INST 941 Internet for 21st Century Teaching and Learning INST 943 Impact of Technology on Education INST 951 Mathematics Instruction with Technology INST 954 Technology Infrastructure Management _____ INST 959 Systemic Change: Curriculum, Instructional Technology and Professional Development (must be your 9th or 10th course) Electives (2): Two (2) elective graduate content courses approved by the program advisor. Choose from the following academic disciplines: art, biology, earth science, English, foreign language, geography, history, mathematics. Course # Title of Course _______ ___________________________________ _______ ___________________________________ TWO-PART CULMINATING ACTIVITY: (TO BE COMPLETED DURING THE LAST SEMESTER OF YOUR GRADUATE PROGRAM) Portfolio Written Comprehensive Examination COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS (Source: FSU Graduate Catalog, 2012-2013, pages 17-18) An oral, written or electronic comprehensive examination is required of students in several graduate programs and is indicated in this catalog. This examination must be taken no later than the semester following the last semester or term of coursework and requires prior approval in writing by the Dean of Graduate and Continuing Education and by the members of the Examination Committee. Where required, students must receive a passing grade on both their portfolio as well as comprehensive examination in order to graduate.
  3. 3. Page 3 of 19 There are four graduation dates per year during which diplomas are issued: December, January, May and August. Commencement exercises are held in February and May. In order to participate in Commencement, graduate students must have completed all degree requirements. Applications for comprehensive examinations and for Commencement are due during the semester preceding the semester in which the student intends to graduate. The dates are as follows: August 15 December graduation October 15 January graduation January 15 May graduation April 15 August graduation The comprehensive examination is conducted by a three-member panel established in accordance with the nature of the student’s program of study. Candidates pursuing the M.Ed. must have one member of the panel representing the field of education and two in the specific discipline the student has chosen. All other panels are to comprise three members of the specific discipline. The comprehensive examination must be passed with a minimum grade of B- or the equivalent at the graduate level and is scored by each member of the panel. A majority ruling determines the results. A student who fails the comprehensive examination shall be given one opportunity to take it again, after he or she has made substantial progress in whatever additional work may have been prescribed by the student’s advisor. Students who fail the first examination do not have the option of appealing the decision because they have the opportunity to take it a second time. The repeat comprehensive cannot be taken in the semester of failure without the approval of the Dean and Program Advisor. However, it must be completed by the end of the following semester. Students must file a new application form prior to the next applicable deadline. On a repeat examination, a five-member panel consisting of the Dean and three or four specialists in the specific discipline (one education representative for M.Ed. candidates) is required. Students are not allowed more than one attempt to retake the comprehensive examination. There is a fee of $125.00 for each comprehensive examination and a commencement fee of $35. CULMINATING ACTIVITY All candidates for the Master of Education in Curriculum and Instructional Technology must complete a two-part culminating activity during the last semester of their graduate program to demonstrate their competency in the field of instructional technology. Part 1 consists of the submission of a portfolio that includes examples of how the student fulfilled the requirement of completing a seventy-five hour field experience. Field-based experiences are an integral component of a program for
  4. 4. Page 4 of 19 the preparation of educators. These experiences need to address the five Professional Standards for Teachers and the subject matter knowledge requirements. Part 2 consists of a written comprehensive examination completed online. The written examination is a synthesis and application of knowledge acquired during the course of study leading to the master's degree; consequently, satisfactory performance in course work does not necessarily guarantee successful performance on the final comprehensive examination. The written comprehensive examination consists of three questions (issues) posed by the faculty. Students are required to respond to these issues based on the knowledge they have gained from their coursework. These issues will be similar to the sample questions listed below. The questions will be representative of topics covered in both core and concentration courses. The written comprehensive examination is administered on the first Saturday in April, August and December. Access to the online examination will be made available through the Blackboard CIT site at 8:30 AM. While the examination is designed to take three hours, students may submit their exam responses up to 2 PM. No exams will be accepted after 2 PM. Many students make use of study groups to prepare for the exam, however, consultation or cooperation with classmates or others during the examination is strictly forbidden. Application forms for the comprehensive examination and graduation can be downloaded from http://www.framingham.edu/continuing-education/documents/comp- comm-applic-dec2013-may20141.pdf. PART ONE FIELD EXPERIENCE and PORTFOLIO Field experience: Students matriculated in the M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instructional Technology must complete seventy-five hours of field experience distributed among the concentration courses at the discretion of the student. To document this work, the student must maintain an electronic portfolio and submit the URL to Kim Cochrane kcochrane1@framingham.edu at least one week prior to taking the written comprehensive examination. As stated at 603 CMR 7.4: Requirements for Field-Based Experience for the Initial License (http://www.doe.mass.edu/lawsregs/603cmr7.html?section=04), field-based experiences are an integral component of any program for the preparation of educators. They must begin early in the preparation program (pre- practicum) and be integrated into the courses or seminars that address Professional Standards for Teachers or Professional Standards for Administrators.
  5. 5. Page 5 of 19 Portfolio requirements: The portfolio must be designed to reflect your direct field experiences with students. It must be organized according to the following: 1. A cover letter discussing your field experiences and how it supported your coursework. 2. A table that shows how you allocated your seventy-five hours of direct field experiences. 3. A table that demonstrates how your selected documents are connected to the appropriate frameworks, Professional Standards and subject matter knowledge requirements for teachers. To help you create the grid, download the standards/requirements from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education web site, http://www.doe.mass.edu/lawsregs/603cmr7.html?section=06. For your convenience the standards/requirements are listed below. 4. A written reflection should begin each section of your portfolio in which you (1) identify the artifacts and provide contextual information, (2) describe how each artifact demonstrates your knowledge and skills in this standard/subject matter knowledge, and (3) discuss how you will change your practice in the future based on what you’ve learned. 5. Selected documents to validate your field experiences might include a copy of lesson plans that have been taught and evaluated with student work attached (if appropriate), PowerPoint presentations including an explanation of the audience and its purpose, Web home page, WebQuests including student work (if appropriate), etc. Sample electronic portfolios: http://www.sevenhillscharter.org/belanger/electronic%20portfolio.html http://collinseportfolio.pbworks.com/ http://www.sciencefreaks.com/portfolio.shtml http://www.geocities.com/suz_trottier/portfoliocontents.htm http://primaryschool.asfg.mx/ptc/Portfolio_Judith_Kimmel_Ramirez/Index.htm http://home.comcast.net/~fscportfolio/Index.htm http://kaltavesta.portfoliovillage.com/ (Education Technology Concentration) Grading: Portfolios are graded on a pass/fail basis. PART TWO WRITTEN COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION SAMPLE EXAMINATION QUESTIONS (NOTE: Questions on the actual examination may be similar but will NOT be identical to these questions. These questions are provided so that you will understand the nature of questions posed on a comprehensive examination. BE SURE to read and answer the examination questions on your comprehensive examination. Some students prepare answers to the questions below and
  6. 6. Page 6 of 19 attempt to make them “fit” their examination questions. This has not been a successful approach. If it is a two-part question, be sure to answer both parts.) 1. A watchword, or perhaps catchword, in education today is innovation - in curriculum, in teaching techniques, in technology and other tools of teaching. Yet, if we look at what actually occurs in our schools we realize there has been little or no change in the actual content of education. The core of education at all levels has been the liberal arts, the arts and science curriculum, the three R’s, or some other name. How can technology be integrated in such a manner as to remedy this situation? 2. It is sometimes said that there are two means of integrating technology into the classroom, automating and informating. The former puts technology to use by automating what we are already doing in schools. The latter puts technology to use by actually changing the manner in which we deal with information. Compare these approaches within the context of preparing students to achieve at higher levels on the MCAS. An excellent response to this question is given in the next section. Use it as a study guide. 3. There is a continuing debate pertaining to curriculum development and instructional design that centers on common core advocates and constructivist advocates. The common core advocates insist that, especially during these times of rapidly exploding information, there is a need for a stable common core of knowledge. Constructivists, on the other hand, argue that the concept of a common core is obsolete and that the role of the teacher is to help students construct a knowledge base reflecting their own experiences. How does instructional technology fit into this debate? 4. Some suggest that education worthy of the name must be democratic; that is, it must occur within the context of democracy understood as a "way of life" rather than a series of specific institutions, grade levels or courses. How can instructional technology contribute to enhancing education as a way of life? 5. Educational technologists and philosophers alike suggest that computer technologies are neutral in character and have meaning only insofar as they are put to use by educators. Hence, a computer in a classroom is neither good nor bad, but only as the teacher decides to use it for educationally sound or unsound purposes. What types of professional development programs and services should be brought to bear on this matter? 6. The School Committee, concerned over parental complaints about the availability of pornography and other objectionable materials on the Internet, is wondering whether a policy for the district that includes a central security system of blocking software should be developed. However, the School Committee is also concerned that such a policy might be overly restrictive. The issue is now in the hands of administrators and
  7. 7. Page 7 of 19 teachers in the interest of eliciting suggestions. What would you suggest and why? 7. Your school prides itself in its new technology. In addition to the computer labs, each classroom has a teacher work station linked to a large-screen monitor for group presentations. In addition to this new equipment, teachers have been taught how to use presentation software. Power Point in particular has become a very popular tool. Recently, however, students and parents have been complaining that so many teachers are making slide presentations that they are getting too commonplace, even boring at times. "After all, how many different sound effects can you throw at these kids?" Assuming that there is considerable substance to this concern, define the likely problem(s) and develop some solutions. 8. Many commercial software companies are inundating the schools with commercially prepared educational software; that is, pre-set software programs that claim to teach reading, writing, mathematics, science, foreign languages, and any number of other subjects. What are the implications associated with this recent development? 9. Your school is brand new! It is equipped with state-of-the-art technology. The principal has asked you to prepare a professional development program pertaining to the use of the Internet and the World Wide Web. What would you suggest? 10. During a recent faculty room discussion, teachers complained that some students were upset at their low grades on a recent research project. One teacher was visibly upset, saying, "Just because they find something on the Internet, they think it’s true." Another teacher added to the discussion by saying, "Some of my kids just print the Web pages and turned them in with their name at the top." What is the problem here? How should it be addressed? 11. As an instructional technology specialist, you are a member of the planning committee for the development of a new school. (The choice of level is yours - you can choose elementary, middle, or high school.) At one of the early meetings, the topic of "computer labs" arose. Some members proposed that the best approach to technology planning rests in well- equipped computer labs. Other members were opposed to this, strongly advocating for clusters of computers in individual classrooms. Finally, since the discussion was not about to come to agreement, the committee chairperson asked you to prepare a list of pros and cons for discussion at the next meeting so that all committee members could discuss things logically rather than emotionally. How would you approach this assignment? 12. You have recently been hired as an instructional technology specialist in a small school with very little technology integration. It is an old building and actually has very little technology. The building is not networked and only three of the ten classrooms have Internet access by way of a modem
  8. 8. Page 8 of 19 and phone line. However, the school will soon be replaced by a brand new building. The new school will be networked and each classroom will have four computers, a printer and a scanner. However, all is not well! It seems that the faculty simply cannot get beyond the Mac-vs. -PC debate. It looks like the principal will have to resolve this issue somehow, and he has asked you asked you for advice. What would you advise and why? Sample Response to Question #2 Note: The following response is a submission from one of our students. It is an excellent example of the quality of response expected from our graduates. The references need to be changed to the APA format, which is now required on the written comprehensive examination. APA (American Psychological Association)APA Research Style Crib Sheet provides a quick spot to check on proper APA format for citations. http://www.docstyles.com/apacrib.htm APA Style.org is the official APA site. http://www.apastyle.org/elecref.html Response: The discussions centering on the concept of automating versus informating are not new. Bertram Bruce wrote an interesting article about the evolution of the term “educational technology.” In one school of thought, educational technology seemed to include “any device, medium, or artifact that is used for instruction, thus both the familiar chalkboard and the textbook,” and in another group, educational technology “extended to include lesson plans, assessment procedures, essentially any form of codified educational practice.” (Bruce, 1999) As inventions, such as film strips, television, or a simple globe of the earth, made their appearance, the argument between the item and its use continued. Computers are no exception. When you automate, you do the same thing you always did only more efficiently. Using technology as a form of automation has improved education by facilitating the many tasks done manually. Additional free time allows educators the opportunity to develop interesting and diverse curricula. Although this is beneficial, using technology to informate would allow educators to communicate with each other, share ideas, and collaborate on projects. Informating has much broader implications. If this is true for educators, think of the possibilities it holds for students. Being a mathematics teacher, I remember when calculators first arrived on the scene. Students were overjoyed they no longer had to spend endless hours doing long division. Their lives had been automated and the benefit was that I could spend more time teaching concepts rather than waiting for everyone to finish doing the calculations. The automating increased the information base I could provide. But that was then and this is now. Informating has come into my classroom via the calculator and this September, I will be teaching mathematics entirely by calculator. I will not be using it as a computing device, but as a way for students to acquire problem-solving strategies. By
  9. 9. Page 9 of 19 inputting data and analyzing the results as seen on a graph, students will learn how to develop a formula rather than memorizing the dozen or more that are required. This is a much more productive way for students to learn. I see computer technology in the same way. In addition to increasing student interest and productivity, integrating computer technology into the curriculum challenges the thought process and expands problem-solving strategies. In a world where information abounds, integrating technology into the classroom allows children to synthesize information as well as analyze it. Instead of just increasing the information base, students are now increasing their knowledge base. And that is the major thrust of the MCAS tests. The tests were designed to measure performance based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework and for mathematics the Curriculum Framework states: “The core concept of Achieving Mathematical Power is that students develop mathematical power through problem solving, communication, reasoning and connections. The mathematics framework is more than a collection of concepts and skills. For each individual it involves methods of investigating and reasoning, means of communication, notions of context, and development of personal self-confidence. The framework provides quality and equity for all learners.” http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/archive/math96/Mathpref.html Technology is a way for students to experience math as something other than pencil and paper calculations copied from a page of exercises in a book. It is more than automating. The guiding principles underlying the direction of mathematics education include opportunities for students to explore mathematical ideas in ways that maintain their enjoyment of and curiosity about mathematics, help them develop depth of understanding, and reflect real-world applications. Students need to work together in teams and groups to enhance mathematical learning, help each other communicate effectively, and develop social and mathematical skills. Students need to see that mathematics learning is a lifelong process that begins and continues in the home and extends to school and community settings, as well as the connection with other disciplines. Although I focused on mathematics, the goals and standards for the other disciplines are similar. For example, in English Language Arts “The Core Concept, Guiding Principles, and Learning Standards of this framework emphasize the importance of increasingly challenging learning experiences that help students develop English language arts skills, learn how to reason about spoken and written discourse, and form aesthetic judgments. As part of these learning experiences, students must develop reflective intelligence.” http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/eng97/englishCC.html and in science “If students in Massachusetts are to learn about science and technology, they need to tangle with questions just as scientists and technologists do. They need to participate in projects, investigations, and design challenges that allow them to puzzle and search, raise questions, and rethink them. Like scientists and technologists, they must arrive at the essential content of science and technology through inquiry. The Massachusetts Common Core of Learning affirms the
  10. 10. Page 10 of 19 importance of Inquiry for all students learning to solve complex problems. This framework, like the others, builds on that understanding. Inquiry is at the heart of science and technology education.” http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/archive/sci96/science2.html Informating changes the way learning occurs by focusing on “what’s flowing through the wires and boxes rather than the wires and boxes.” (November 1998). Automating simply helps the information flow through the wires faster. The MCAS are based on frameworks that address a student’s deeper understanding of information, not how fast or how much he or she can supply. Informating supplies educators with a way to assist students to reach beyond memorization to the type of multifaceted understanding MCAS tests reflect. Many of the principles of the MCAS tests can be met by designing units utilizing project-based learning, which are models of informating, not automating. If the MCAS tests are evaluating students who are focusing on concepts involving critical thinking skills, problem-solving skills, and real-life applications, integrating technology in an informating way becomes the method of choice. References: These references need to be changed to the APA format Bruce, Bertram C. (1999, July 19). “Educational Technology.” [Online]. Encyclopedia of Philosophy of Education. University of Illinois. Available: http://www.educacao.pro.br/educationaltechnologychip.htm (2000, July 24). Massachusetts Department of Education (2000). “English Language Arts: Core Concept.” [Online] Available: http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/eng97/englishCC.html (2000, August 1). Massachusetts Department of Education (2000). “Developing the Mathematics Curriculum Frameworks.” [Online] Available: http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/archive/math96/Mathpref.html (2000, July 14) Massachusetts Department of Education (2000). “Science and Technology Curriculum Frameworks: Owning the Questions.” [Online] Available: http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/archive/sci96/science2.html (2000, August 1). November, Alan. (1998, February). "Creating A New Culture of Teaching and Learning." [Online}. Educational Renaissance Planners Web Site. Available: http://www.anovember.com/articles/asilomar.html (2000, February 15). The Benton Foundation Website (1996, December). “The Learning Connection.” [Online]. Available: http://www.benton.org/Library/Schools/home.html (2000, July 31)
  11. 11. Page 11 of 19 FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) Who is my advisor? Kim Cochrane is your academic advisor. She can be reached at kcochrane1@framingham.edu. Please type “your name and M. Ed. CIT Advising” in the subject line of your email. Is it necessary to have the written approval of my advisor for all of the courses in my degree program? Yes, each semester you need to contact Kim Cochrane to obtain her written approval prior to registering for ALL courses in your degree program. A copy of the approvals will be placed in your file at DGCE. What teaching license will I obtain after completing this program? This program leads to an initial license as an Instructional Technology Teacher, all levels. How many years do I have to complete this degree? All requirements for the degree (programs of 10 courses) must be completed within six (6) years from the end of the semester in which the student is first matriculated in a master’s program. (Source: FSU 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog, page 11). What if I need to take some time off? All matriculated students who do not take at least one (1) course during the academic year will become inactive. Inactive students must apply for re- admission in writing when seeking to return to active status. Students returning to a program after being away for more than two consecutive semesters (excluding summer) are subject to the new program requirements upon their return. (Source: FSU 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog, page 11) How many courses may I take during a semester? Students matriculated in a part-time graduate program can take no more than two courses during the Fall or Spring semester, and no more than three courses during the Summer sessions, without written approval from their advisor. (Source: FSU 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog, page 12) May I transfer professional development courses to my degree program? Professional development courses, even at the graduate level, will not be accepted in transfer toward a master’s degree. (Source: FSU 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog, page 10)
  12. 12. Page 12 of 19 When and how do I apply for the comprehensive examination and commencement? You should apply for both the examination and commencement during the next to the last semester of your coursework. Please follow the following schedule: deadline for the August exam is April 15; deadline for the December exam is August 15; deadline for the April exam is January 15. You can download the application from the website: http://www.framingham.edu/continuing-education/documents/comp-comm- applic-dec2013-may20141.pdf Who is required to complete a practicum? Students seeking an initial Instructional Technology Teacher License (all levels) are required to complete a practicum (INST 939 Practicum in Instructional Technology). Prior to applying for the practicum, a passing score for the Communication and Literacy Skills Test of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) must be submitted to the Framingham State University Division of Graduate and Continuing Education. The practicum is taken only after successful completion of all degree requirements in the Master of Education with a concentration in Curriculum and Instructional Technology program. Permission of the program advisor at least three (3) months prior to the practicum is required. Students secure their own practicum site, which must be approved by the University. For students seeking a first Initial License, a field-based 300-hour practicum or practicum equivalent is required. Students must complete 150 hours at each of any two of the following levels: PreK-6, 5-8, 8-12. For students seeking an additional Initial License, a 150-hour practicum or practicum equivalent in the role of the license in an appropriate classroom, determined by the program advisor, is required. The student is guided by the cooperating school system and his/her university supervisor. (The practicum application starts on page 17 of this document). How do I apply for initial licensure as an Instructional Technology teacher (all levels)? After you receive your M.Ed. in CIT AND have completed the required number of practicum hours, you may apply for your initial license in instructional technology. A website has been created to help you with the process. Go to https://sites.google.com/site/fsulicensure/, click on Master’s Degree Program, click on Curriculum and Instructional Technology and follow the prompts.
  13. 13. Page 13 of 19 For your reference Massachusetts Department of Education Education Laws and Regulations 603 CMR 7.00 http://www.doe.mass.edu/lawsregs/603cmr7.html?section=08 7.08: Professional Standards for Teachers (1) Application. The Professional Standards for Teachers define the pedagogical and other professional knowledge and skills required of all teachers. These Standards are used by teacher preparation providers in preparing their candidates, by the Department in reviewing programs seeking state approval, and by the Department as the basis of performance assessments of candidates. Candidates shall demonstrate that they meet the Professional Standards by passing a Performance Assessment for Initial License (a) in the practicum or practicum equivalent phase of preparation for the Initial License or (b) as part of the Performance Assessment Program. The Department will issue guidelines for each type of performance assessment to reflect differences in growth in professional knowledge and skills. (2) Standards for All Teachers Except Library and Speech, Language, and Hearing Disorders Teachers (a) Plans Curriculum and Instruction. 1. Draws on content standards of the relevant curriculum frameworks to plan sequential units of study, individual lessons, and learning activities that make learning cumulative and advance students' level of content knowledge. 2. Draws on results of formal and informal assessments as well as knowledge of human development to identify teaching strategies and learning activities appropriate to the specific discipline, age, and range of cognitive levels being taught. 3. Identifies appropriate reading materials, other resources, and writing activities for promoting further learning by the full range of students within the classroom. 4. Identifies prerequisite skills, concepts, and vocabulary needed for the learning activities. 5. Plans lessons with clear objectives and relevant measurable outcomes. 6. Draws on resources from colleagues, families, and the community to enhance learning. 7. Incorporates appropriate technology and media in lesson planning. 8. Uses information in Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) to plan strategies for integrating students with disabilities into general education classrooms. (b) Delivers Effective Instruction. 1. Communicates high standards and expectations when beginning the lesson: a. Makes learning objectives clear to students. b. Communicates clearly in writing and speaking. c. Uses engaging ways to begin a new unit of study or lesson. d. Builds on students' prior knowledge and experience. 2. Communicates high standards and expectations when carrying out the lesson: a. Uses a balanced approach to teaching skills and concepts of elementary reading and writing.
  14. 14. Page 14 of 19 b. Employs a variety of content-based and content-oriented teaching techniques from more teacher-directed strategies such as direct instruction, practice, and Socratic dialogue, to less teacher-directed approaches such as discussion, problem solving, cooperative learning, and research projects (among others). c. Demonstrates an adequate knowledge of and approach to the academic content of lessons. d. Employs a variety of reading and writing strategies for addressing learning objectives. e. Uses questioning to stimulate thinking and encourages all students to respond. f. Uses instructional technology appropriately. g. Employs appropriate sheltered English or subject matter strategies for English learners 3. Communicates high standards and expectations when extending and completing the lesson: a. Assigns homework or practice that furthers student learning and checks it. b. Provides regular and frequent feedback to students on their progress. c. Provides many and varied opportunities for students to achieve competence. 4. Communicates high standards and expectations when evaluating student learning: a. Accurately measures student achievement of, and progress toward, the learning objectives with a variety of formal and informal assessments, and uses results to plan further instruction. b. Translates evaluations of student work into records that accurately convey the level of student achievement to students, parents or guardians, and school personnel. (c) Manages Classroom Climate and Operation. 1. Creates an environment that is conducive to learning. 2. Creates a physical environment appropriate to a range of learning activities. 3. Maintains appropriate standards of behavior, mutual respect, and safety. 4. Manages classroom routines and procedures without loss of significant instructional time. (d) Promotes Equity. 1. Encourages all students to believe that effort is a key to achievement. 2. Works to promote achievement by all students without exception. 3. Assesses the significance of student differences in home experiences, background knowledge, learning skills, learning pace, and proficiency in the English language for learning the curriculum at hand and uses professional judgment to determine if instructional adjustments are necessary. 4. Helps all students to understand American civic culture, its underlying ideals, founding political principles and political institutions, and to see themselves as members of a local, state, national, and international civic community. (e) Meets Professional Responsibilities. 1. Understands his or her legal and moral responsibilities. 2. Conveys knowledge of and enthusiasm for his/her academic discipline to students.
  15. 15. Page 15 of 19 3. Maintains interest in current theory, research, and developments in the academic discipline and exercises judgment in accepting implications or findings as valid for application in classroom practice. 4. Collaborates with colleagues to improve instruction, assessment, and student achievement. 5. Works actively to involve parents in their child's academic activities and performance, and communicates clearly with them. 6. Reflects critically upon his or her teaching experience, identifies areas for further professional development as part of a professional development plan that is linked to grade level, school, and district goals, and is receptive to suggestions for growth. 7. Understands legal and ethical issues as they apply to responsible and acceptable use of the Internet and other resources. Massachusetts Department of Education Education Laws and Regulations 603 CMR 7.00 7.06: Subject Matter Knowledge Requirements for Teachers Instructional Technology (Levels: All) http://www.doe.mass.edu/lawsregs/603cmr7.html?section=06 (14) Instructional Technology (Levels: All) (a) The following topics will be addressed on a test of subject matter knowledge: 1. Technology tools for word processing, databases, spreadsheets, print/graphic utilities, multi- and hypermedias, presentations, videos for the purpose of formal and informal assessment, instruction, and administration for professional and instructional use. 2. Communications and research tools such as email, world wide web, web browsers, and other online applications that link to the state standards and requirements, for professional and instructional use. 3. Criteria for selection, evaluation, and use of appropriate computer/technology based materials to support a variety of instructional methods. 4. Ethical and social issues surrounding privacy, copyright, and crime relating to educational technology and resources. (b) The following topics shall be included in an approved program but will not be addressed on a test of subject matter knowledge: 1. Use of resources for adaptive/assistive devices that provide access for all students. 2. Methods to support classroom teachers and other school personnel in improving student learning through appropriate use of technology in the classroom, including consultation techniques and professional development.
  16. 16. Page 16 of 19 GENERAL INFORMATION about the CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY Practicum 1. The practicum is completed after all degree requirements have been successfully completed (10 courses, portfolio and written comprehensive examination). 2. Candidates must apply for the practicum at least three months before the desired practicum beginning date. All applications must be submitted electronically to Dr. Graham (czgraham@hotmail.com) and hardcopy (with your signature). Mail the hardcopy to the Jackie Dorr at the FSU Division of Graduate and Continuing Education. 3. Practicum Requirements as defined by 603 CMR 7.00 Regulations for Educator Licensure http://www.doe.mass.edu/lawsregs/603cmr7.html?section=04 Section 7.04 Part (4) A practicum is required for candidates seeking an Initial license as an Instructional Technology Teacher (all levels). The length of the practicum is 300 hours if this is your first initial license. 150 hours at each of any two of the following levels: PreK-6, 5-8, 8-12 If it is your second initial license, the length of the practicum is 150 hours. 75 hours at each of any two of the following levels: PreK-6, 5-8, 8-12 4. A practicum must be supervised jointly by the (university) supervisor from the preparation program in which the candidate is enrolled and the supervising practitioner (cooperating teacher). The supervising practitioner responsible for the larger portion of the practicum and the program supervisor will together evaluate the candidate on the basis of the appropriate standards. Disagreement between the supervising practitioner and the program supervisor will be resolved by the decision of a third person chosen jointly by them. 5. MTEL Requirements Prior to applying for the practicum, candidates must submit evidence of a passing score on the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills Test. 6. The candidate is responsible for securing a placement site and obtaining the approval of the Program Coordinator and the Dean. In order to formally apply for the practicum, candidates must submit a completed Application for a Practicum in Curriculum and Instructional Technology (see below). 7. DGCE will notify the candidate, in writing, once the request for the Practicum has been approved. A copy of the letter will be sent to the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. 8. Consult the Semester Bulletin for information on the dates for the Practicum and the date and location of the first seminar. Candidates will register for the practicum as you would for any other course.
  17. 17. Page 17 of 19 FRAMINGHAM STATE UNIVERSITY Division of Graduate and Continuing Education APPLICATION FOR A PRACTICUM IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY NAME: _____________________________________________________________________________ First M.I. Last ADDRESS: ___________________________________________________________________________ number/street city/town state/zip HOME PHONE______________________________BUSINESS PHONE__________________________ area code/number area code/number EMAIL ADDRESS _____________________________________________________________________ SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER____________________________SEMESTER/YEAR_______________ LICENSE SOUGHT: Initial Instructional Technology Teacher (all levels) DATE OF APPLICATION: _______________________ PROGRAM ADVISOR: Dr. Claire J. Graham ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Current Employment Information (be specific if you are currently teaching and/or employed in a school setting) _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Practicum Placement Information (Please complete the information for the two levels of your practicum: PreK-6, 5-8, 8-12) LEVEL: _______________________________ NAME OF SCHOOL______________________________________________________ ADDRESS OF SCHOOL __________________________________________________________ number/street city/town state/zip PRINCIPAL _______________________________________ TELEPHONE ______________________ Name of Cooperating Teacher ____________________________________________________________ Email address of cooperating teacher _______________________________________________________ Title____________________________________________________Tenured: Yes_________No_______ License(s) held by Cooperating Teacher __________________________________________________ Number of years of employment in role (minimum of three) _____________________________________ Do you have children who attend this school? _______________________________________________ Do you have an immediate family member employed in this school? ______________________________
  18. 18. Page 18 of 19 LEVEL: _______________________________ NAME OF SCHOOL __________________________________________________ ADDRESS OF SCHOOL___________________________________________________________ number/street city/town state/zip PRINCIPAL _______________________________________ TELEPHONE ______________________ Name of Cooperating Teacher ____________________________________________________________ Email address of cooperating teacher _______________________________________________________ Title____________________________________________________Tenured: Yes_________No_______ License(s) held by Cooperating Teacher __________________________________________________ Number of years of employment in role (minimum of three) _____________________________________ Do you have children who attend this school? _______________________________________________ Do you have an immediate family member employed in this school? ______________________________ ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… PLEASE ATTACH A DESCRIPTION OF YOUR INTENDED PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE (BOTH LEVELS). In order to meet the DESE regulations you will be expected to include these experiences in your practicum experiences. 1. Technology tools for word processing, databases, spreadsheets, print/graphic utilities, multi- and hypermedias, presentations, videos for the purpose of formal and informal assessment, instruction, and administration for professional and instructional use. 2. Communications and research tools such as email, world wide web, web browsers, and other online applications that link to the state standards and requirements, for professional and instructional use. 3. Criteria for selection, evaluation, and use of appropriate computer/technology based materials to support a variety of instructional methods. 4. Ethical and social issues surrounding privacy, copyright, and crime relating to educational technology and resources. 5. Use of resources for adaptive/assistive devices that provide access for all students. 6. Methods to support classroom teachers and other school personnel in improving student learning through appropriate use of technology in the classroom, including consultation techniques and professional development. If any aspect of my proposed practicum placement(s) changes before beginning or while in the practicum, I will notify the Program Coordinator immediately. ____________________________________________________ ________________________ Student’s Signature Date Please return the completed hardcopy application to: Ms. Jackie Dorr DGCE, Framingham State University 100 State Street Framingham, MA 01701 Please submit an electronic copy to Dr. Claire J. Graham at czgraham@hotmail.com
  19. 19. Page 19 of 19 For Office Use Only: Application Review for _______________________________________________ Practicum in Curriculum and Instructional Technology Student has successfully completed all degree requirements. Application has been submitted three months prior to the start of the practicum. Student has passed the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills test. Student’s 150 (or 75) hour practicum at Level _________________ is approved as described. Student’s 150 (or 75) hour practicum at Level _________________ is approved as described. Cooperating Teachers have the appropriate credentials. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The student is approved for the 300 (150) hour practicum as described in this application. _____________________________________ ___________________________________ Program Coordinator Date The student is approved for the 300 (150) hour practicum as described in this application. _____________________________________ ___________________________________ Dean Date --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The applicant is not approved to enroll in the practicum in CIT at this time for the following reason(s): 1/11 cjg

×