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African-Americans in Modern Media

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  • You guys are great c:
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  • To add on to what Stephen was saying, you could make your text colored and add more pictures to make it exciting
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  • The graph on slide 6 seems a little random because it includes more races than just blacks
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  • Good info, but it's kinda dull. Could use more excitement
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  • I agree with Justin, it should be longer. You could probably add something about how whenever a black celebrity is on a magazine cover, their skin is lighter than it naturally is. Other than that, nice presentation!
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African-Americans in Modern Media

  1. 1. African-Americans in Modern Media Lauren Garren Social Media
  2. 2. The earliest of films historically cast whites in non-white roles Elizabeth Taylor in “Cleopatra” One of the earliest films, Birth of the Nation (1915) employed blackface on white actors for African-American actors. While these casting decision might have been expected during an era of racial segregation and oppression, Hollywood has continued to make casting decisions that prefer white actors over minority actors.
  3. 3. In more recent movie memory… In 2000's Pay it Forward, Spacey plays a character named Eugene Simonet, the teacher who inspires main character Trevor McKinney to change the world. In the book on which the movie is based, Simonet’s name is actually Reuben S. Claire, and he's a black man. In Oliver Stone’s World Trade Center film (2006), both of the two characters who rescued the protagonist, Sgt. Jason Thomas and Sgt. Dave Karnes, were cast as white actors. Sergeant Thomas is played by William Mapother, a white actor, however, in real life, he is an African- American man. The real Sgt. Thomas
  4. 4. And in the few roles that blacks manage to receive, most of them reinforce the stereotypical view of blacks. According to the Entman-Rojecki Index of Race and Media, 89% of Black female movie characters are shown using vulgar language, while only 17% of White woman are. Black women are shown as being violent in movies 56% of the time compared to the 11% of white women. People begin to associate being black with poverty, the “ghetto,” cruelty, crime, and jail, etc.
  5. 5. And even with “quality” movie with black portrayal, Hollywood producers seem fixated on telling the “Ghetto” story, the “sports story”, the “slavery” story, and the “racism” story in their movies. And yes, while these movies do allow for great artistic ability to shine through, what about the other stories? At what age can their skin color not become a plot device, but just a part of their character?
  6. 6. This problem isn’t only affecting African Americans Broadway Shows
  7. 7. Even with the small steps Hollywood is taking, there is still resistance. The recent casting of black actor, Michael B. Jordan as Johnny Torch created controversy.
  8. 8. Black actress, Quvenzhané Wallis, was cast into the iconic role of “Annie” Basically
  9. 9. In Conclusion Black portrayal in media could seriously use some improvement and a black Annie is awesome
  10. 10. Cred, yo • http://dancingwiththelight.com/2013/04/01/the-problem-that-must-be-solved/ • http://voices.yahoo.com/racial-stereotypes-media-38872.html • http://www.dailykos.com/story/2012/08/05/1107128/-The-battle-against-whitewashing-and-racebending • http:// www.policymic.com/articles/83309/what-if-people-reacted-to-these-10-roles-like-they-have-to-michael-b-jordan • http://the-artifice.com/hollywood-white-washing/ • http://www.pbs.org/wnet/tavissmiley/features/blacks-in-hollywood-shut-out-or-missing-in-action/

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